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The Immortal Seeds: Life goes on for a Khmer family Paperback – April 15, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 204 pages
  • Publisher: Wheatmark (April 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1604942460
  • ISBN-13: 978-1604942460
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.9 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,686,073 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

"King Grandfather would like to wish that your memoir The Immortal Seeds will become successful."
                                                                                                       -- Norodom Sihanouk

"The Immortal Seeds is a story of war, love, and the unbreakable bonds of family. Touchingly told, Sambath pays homage to her family across the generations, and shares how they helped the Meases to survive the war and thrive in peace."

                                      -- Loung Ung, author of First They Killed My Father and Lucky Child

"The Immortal Seeds exhibits a memoir's emphasis on highly personalized, if not fully contextualized, experiences."

                                                                                                    -- The Phnom Penh Post

About the Author

Sambath Meas received her Bachelor Degree in Political Science from Loyola University Chicago in 1999. Currently, she is pursuing a Master Degree in Creative Writing from Northwestern University Chicago.

More About the Author

After having graduated from Loyola University of Chicago with a bachelor's degree in political science, and having worked in the corporate world for many years, I have decided to continue to improve myself and to contribute to the richness that is Chicago literature. I love reading history, mystery, supernatural, and science-fiction books. Reading generates ideas, and story ideas are flowing out of me like the Tonle Sap River. I am moving forward to chase that sought-after dream of being a writer. That is why I am attending Northwestern University in Chicago to hone my writing skills and to obtain my master's degree in creative nonfiction. Writing is my refuge.

While I am currently investigating the brutal murders of my uncle, his wife, and their fellow villagers in 1995, I am also working on my debut science-fiction novel. I hope to finish it this year.




Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Carey on November 18, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm still sorting out my emotions. In 1973, I was a junior in high school and very involved in praying for peace, protesting the war in Vietnam and the reinstitution of the draft. I first began protesting the war as a seventh grader. In 1969, my mother was mortified when she caught me wearing a black arm band and I continually replaced every one she took away from me. The war in Southeast Asia was the first one where ordinary soldiers had compact cameras, they took pictures and sent them home to their friends and family, making this war more real for everyone in the world. The military may have tried to control the media but the media and the common soldier had other ideas. The war, and all its collateral damage, was in living color in our living rooms.

I think of what I was doing when Ms. Meas and her family were living through the unending chaotic nightmare that was Kampuchea in the 1970s. I remember the confusing news stories about who was battling whom and, yes, the story line was always "Pol Pot + Khmer Rouge = evil" but no one really knew who the "good guys" were... possibly because they were all dead, in refugee camps or fighting for their lives and not for political idealism. I also remember the pictures on the news and in the news magazines. Ms. Meas' collection of stories brought those pictures to life. Her family stories took events that seemed so far away and brought them into focus. The stories of her family could have been stories of any one of our lives, our uncles, aunts and cousins, disrupted by war and political conflict and it also could have been any one of the refugees that died in the fields or in the refugee camps.

I hope that more members of Ms. Meas' generation will tell more of these stories that the previous generation could not tell.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's a true, sad and horrible story that some unfortunate people in some parts of this world had to go through. It's very touching to read.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a great story told based on first-hand events of a Khmer family and their fight for survival. It takes you through the 1960's and 1970's in Cambodia during a era for opportunity that quickly shifts into a time of refuge as a result of the US-Vietnam War and its aftermath. Being a biography/autobiography really captures the authenticity of the story. I highly recommend this book.
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Format: Paperback
Immortal Seeds provides an excellent, sad, but profound examination of the Khmer Diaspora from the point of view of a single family and the tangent Cambodian people in their lives. This is a difficult narrative to read, for the shaping of a family history marred by tragedy, the horrors of war, and political forces beyond the expressions of those who thought they were isolated from world events is the "collateral damage" so often neglected in history books. The large section dealing with the U.s.-North Vietnam war and the secret bombing of Cambodia in a vain effort to suppress the Viet-Cong and their sometime allies the Khmer Rouge (at that point not fully organized), and the subsequent rise of the Khmer Rouge in rational reaction to hated Imperialist bombers is a cautionary tale of the wisdom of intervention in foreign lands.
This is a well-told narrative, giving voice to the many stories of Khmer families that have sadly been buried in rage, depression, self-medication, or insanity. Immortal Seeds sheds much light and healing following a period in which it was rational to despair. Highly recommended.
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