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The Indictment (Dan Sheridan, Book 3) Mass Market Paperback – September 15, 1995


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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Reed (The Verdict; The Choice) has written a well-plotted but curiously flat novel about a possible grand jury indictment against a prominent doctor suspected of murdering a young woman. When Boston attorney Dan Sheridan agrees to defend Dr. Christopher Dillard, he pits himself against a DA with an eye on a U.S. Senate seat and a shady Irish kingmaker who wants the entire case buried. Sheridan also becomes an unwitting target of an FBI sting operation against local lawyers suspected of criminal ties, even as he becomes romantically involved with the agent who is working undercover as one of his secretaries. Matters come to a head during the grand jury hearing: because such a hearing prohibits defense witnesses, Sheridan and his client are forced to watch while a detailed case is built against them. Reed explains the quirky rules governing grand juries in an awkward prologue; elsewhere, the narrative proceeds at a brisk but metronomically even pace that fails to generate suspense and excitement. Nevertheless, Reed, himself a Boston attorney, knows his courtrooms and the city, which he engagingly presents here as a stateside suburb of Dublin in which everybody who is anybody is Irish.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Clean-living defense attorney Dan Sheridan won't accept bribes, but he has one vice: sneaking off to the Boston suburbs to play minor league baseball one night per week. Sheila O'Brien, an FBI agent masquerading as a secretary at his office, follows him to the playing field and falls in love. Meanwhile, the feds expect her to monitor her boss's errands, phone calls, and mail for terrorist connections. In the novel's first chapters, law information is sandwiched awkwardly between sections of dialog, but the breathless plot and the likable protagonists help the reader along. Reed, a Boston attorney and author of the best-selling novels The Verdict (1980) and The Choice (LJ 7/91), has written another absorbing thriller. Recommended for most public libraries.
Joyce Smothers, Monmouth Cty. Lib., Manalapan, N.J.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 436 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Paperbacks; First Edition edition (September 15, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312954166
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312954161
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.9 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,888,222 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 4, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A beautiful woman murdered, of course. A Yale-educated DA running for office, of course. It seems that Barry Reed is more concerned with looks and education rather than plot and dialogue. In this novel where everyone seemed to have "fresh, Nordic features," Reed focused more on the characters than the story. The only bright spot was attorney Dan Sheridan, who is a down-to-earth, broken-nose kind of player. With each description (which could have been stolen from a soap-opera script) was the educational background of each character. Character description is important, mind you, but not the solitary component of the work. I don't believe that a woman who has been lying face down dead in a marshy area for hours is the most beautiful woman the medical examiner had ever seen. It just doesn't happen. And neither did this book. Barry Reed should read Robert K. Tanenbaum, whose characters are believable and enhance the plot, not replace it
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By cityhawk on April 12, 2001
Format: Audio Cassette
I disagree with the Booklist reviewer who thought that the romance angle didn't work in the story. It enhanced it for me... it added a complication that otherwise wouldn't have been there....but then again, I tend to be into that sort of thing.
Anyway, the things that irritated me about the book would go largely unnoticed to anyone who doesn't live in Boston. I didn't mind the geographical liberties that were taken, since it is fiction after all.... but Boston is presented as a kind of Irish theme park.... and while nobody would deny the impact that Irish immigration has had on Boston and its culture over the past 150 years, Boston is a large and very ethnically diverse city.... the Brahmin-vs.-Irish thing is about 120 years out of date. Most people that read this probably won't care about that though.
The rest of the book, while sometimes far-fetched, was a gripping, entertaining read. The pacing was quick and the way that Sheridan's team stayed on top of their adversaries kept the storyline from insulting my intelligence. Lovers of legal chess game-type thrillers should find this hard to put down.
I had some issue with the resolution of the mystery at the very end (if that person was actually guilty of killing the woman,he/she would not have done some of the things he/she did, in my opinion). However, it made for a nice plot twist.
Better character development than Grisham... good legal drama. Like the story "Silent Witness", by Richard North Patterson, in this story, you didn't know if the defendant was guilty or not through the whole story, but you rooted for him anyway, since his lawyer was the "good guy." Makes for an interesting ambivalent feeling when reading.
As a footnote, I listened to this as a "BooksOnTape" auciocassette (unabridged), read by George Guidall from a local library. Too bad that version doesn't seem to be available anymore, as I just love Guidall's delivery.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Shamus on August 20, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am a reality buff, and that usually means accepting fiction that is well written with characters that leave me depressed. Barry Reed in "The Indictment" gave me high crime and legal realism and a hero I could both believe and admire. Our protagonist lawyer, Dan Sheridan, is a modern and urban Atticus Finch, except that Reed allows us into Sheridan's world of doubts, fears, and sex life. Sheridan combines hero and humanity.

I learned a great deal of incidental stuff about lie detector tests, drugs, the IRA, autopsies, and the abuse of grand juries. All this was woven into a complex and absorbing plot. I was tempted to stop reading some pages early but fortunately didn't. The apparent climax was followed by a twist into a second conclusion where natrual justice prevailed over the legal system.

One great read by Reed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By mgstax@aol.com on June 23, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This was a well told story with a complex plot. I found myself rooting for Sheridan and then for his relationship. When that happens, the author has done his job well. I have been entertained and taken out of my daily life - if only for a few brief moments. I enjoyed this book on tape. Full - unabridged version. Recommended.
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