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The Indonesian Kitchen Paperback – March 1, 1984


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Inc; 1st Atheneum Paperback Ed edition (March 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0689706677
  • ISBN-13: 978-0689706677
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.7 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #833,043 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 26, 1998
Format: Paperback
As a "meat-n-potatoes" American woman married to an Indonesian man, I have been looking for a good Indonesian cookbook for 15 years. THIS IS IT. Most other Indonesian cookbooks are written in Dutch or suffer from metric measurements. Recipes from other multi-Asian cookbooks have resulted in bland semi-chinese food. But this book results in authentic Indonesian cooking. All dishes have both English and Indonesian names so I can cook my husband recipes from his childhood. Everything I have tried has turned out delicious. Also the menu planning tips for "rice tables" or banquets help with meal planning. Spices and common ingredients are listed in Indonesian, Latin botanical, English, and Chinese or Indian if applicable.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By MTBearded1@aol.com on May 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
I was first introduced to Indonesian food at a wonderful Rijstaffel (rice table) restaurant in Utrecht, The Netherlands, in 1994. Once I returned to the States, I lost touch with this cuisine. Fortunately, I recently found The Indonesian Kitchen. The recipes are clearly written and easy to follow. The ingredients needed are relatively easy to find if you have any Asian groceries in your area (and since we have a few here in western Montana, you should be able to find them just about anywhere). My family loves the dishes I've prepared from this book, and it will get used often! Spice up your life and try the recipes in this book. You won't be sorry.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book is a guide to cooking Indonesian food in the American kitchen. It begins with a brief introduction to culinary traditions in Indonesia and general cooking techniques, followed by some discussions of spices and coconut. The remainder of the book consists of recipes, organized by type of food. The chapters include: rice, satay (barbecue), soups and noodles, chicken, beef, fish, vegetables, fritters, garnishes and chips, eggs, sauces and dips, and sweets. At the end of the book are some menu suggestions for a rijsttafel (buffet), traditional herbal remedies, a glossary of ingredients, and an index. There are no photographs and very few illustrations.

While the recipes include a sampling from all the major islands (Java, Sumatra, Bali, Borneo, Sulawesi, and Madura), the focus is on Java, Sumatra, and Bali. Many of the recipes include a brief introduction explaining the cultural significance or context of the recipe. Marks has included recipes for many well-known dishes, such as nasi goreng (fried rice), satay (barbecue), rendang (coconut stewed beef), soto ayam (chicken soup), gado-gado (salad with many ingredients), and rujak (green mango salad). On the whole, the directions are clear and many of the recipes can be prepared without a lot of fuss. Marks frequently includes useful notes about which recipes can be made in advance and which freeze well. He also describes which spices are essential to a recipe, and which can be substituted without a great loss in flavor. The chapter on vegetables is titled "Vegetables for the Vegetarian," but this is a bit of a stretch, since recipes in this chapter frequently call for shrimp paste, shrimp, and one even uses ground beef.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Frieslander on February 9, 2010
Format: Paperback
I can't think of another book I've used more than this. The recipes are well explained and easy to follow. I've made whole "rijsttafels" from this book and it has never failed me. My only request would be an updated version with some photos.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Gado-Gado Gal on February 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
I have quite a few Indonesian cookbooks to supplement what I've learned from my mom. This book covers all the basics that you might not find in other Indonesian cookbooks. By this I mean the staples that you might be able to order in a restaurant to supplement fancier dishes or would likely make yourself at home if you were living in Indonesia (e.g. lontong, rempeyek kacang, sambal bajak). While Marks and Soeharjo cover regional variations, they include them side-by-side in the book rather than grouped by region--very helpful for anyone just getting started in Indonesian cooking. I also love the short section on "Spices as Medicinal Remedies"--something almost always considered in Indonesia when deciding what dishes to prepare. You'll be able to make good use of this book if you love to cook Indonesian food.
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