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The Industrial Revolution, 1760-1830 (OPUS) Paperback – January 8, 1998

ISBN-13: 978-0192892898 ISBN-10: 0192892894 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Series: OPUS
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 2 edition (January 8, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192892894
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192892898
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 0.6 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #405,412 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

?It is certainly rare . . . to find, as in Professor Ashton's work, a combination of neatly summarized research, lively humanity, stimulating generalization, bread-and-butter fact, and an unfailing sense of perspective, all embodied in prose of unmistakable, though entirely unpretentious, quality. It is a pleasure to be able to recommend a book, whether to the student or to the general reader, so entirely without reservation. . . . Few accounts of the great inventions leave the unmechanical reader with any genuine understanding of the problems and solutions involved. This one does.?-The Economist --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

T. S. Ashton was Professor of Economic History at the University of London from 1944 to 1954, and Emeritus Professor until his death in 1968. Pat Hudson is Professor Economic and Social History at the University of Liverpool.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Bob Newman VINE VOICE on October 12, 1999
Format: Paperback
First published in 1948, this book has gone through many editions, the latest, as we can see here, put out in 1998. I recently read the 1964 edition, picked up long ago at a booksale in Melbourne, Australia. Ashton's work is probably timeless. It is a down-to-earth, very well reasoned history of the various historical tendencies and phenomena that together are called "the industrial revolution". I cannot vouch for this volume being absolutely correct. The author does not have much time for those who dwell on the evils of industrialization, or who want to include class struggle in their analysis. Though I was not fully convinced of this, still I was willing to listen. Not being an expert in the field, I was looking for a decent explanation or summary of the whole process. I definitely got my money's worth in Ashton's book. It is well-written, without jargon and without presumption of vast historical knowledge on the part of the reader. It gives you an overview of such various fields as population growth, early forms of industry in England, the technical innovations, capital, banking, labor unions, conditions of workers, industrialists' clubs, and relation of agriculture to industry. Though I found the part about banks and interest rather rough going, it was entirely due to my own poor understanding of the field. My edition could have used a map. The shires, the rivers, and the many towns of England are not all imprinted firmly in the brains of North Americans. Other than that, I would heartily recommend this book to anyone who wants to improve their understanding of the Industrial Revolution.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 3, 1998
Format: Paperback
I can't believe I'm the first to write about this. I bought this a few years back while a graduate student in modern European history. My focus was primarily industrialization. This book is a joy. Ashton provides a thorough picture of the Revolution from several perspectives. He describes how events and developments built upon each other and how the innovators fed each others efforts. Most importantly, Ashton is a terrific writer. Other books on this and like topics can be as dry as the Sahara. Ashton is engaging and witty. This is not a book that requires a terrifically large committment. Even if you are not a student but simply interested in the topic, please read this.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Grover VINE VOICE on June 10, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you are looking for a well written and concise history of the Industrial Revolution then this book is for you. It provides a decent overview but little detail or analysis.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven H Propp TOP 50 REVIEWER on February 16, 2012
Format: Paperback
Thomas Southcliffe Ashton (1899-1968) was professor of economic history at the London School of Economics from 1944 until 1954, and also wrote the books An economic history of England: the 18th century, and Economic Fluctuations in England 1700-1800.

He notes that "It has often been observed that the growth of industry was connected historically with the rise of groups which dissented from the Church by law established in England." (Pg. 14)

He states that as with industries making us of "casual" labor today, "more people entered these trades than could be assured of regular work. Underemployment, rather than periodic unemployment, was the bane of the domestic worker." (Pg. 39)

Ashton points out that throughout the 18th century, it was customary for manufacturers to be paid for their goods as long as two years later; but with the speeding up of transport and communciations, "there was a tendency to shorten the accommodation." He adds, "A new sense of time was one of the outstanding psychological features of the industrial revolution." (Pg. 69)

When dealing with the question of child labor, Ashton cautions us, "The conduct of factory masters must be judged in the light of their own age and of that which preceded it," since we now have a standard of life "immeasurably higher" than theirs, and we place "a different value on child life." (Pg.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By B. Surkan on July 30, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a collection of essays on economic history pertaining to the Industrial Revolution. It is not a politically correct book, often turning traditional accepted beliefs about the industrial revolution on their heads. For example, one of the reasons why many poor families had dingy, windowless dwellings was the window tax charged by the government based on the number of windows in your house. Ventilation and health suffered as a result. Another example is the reason for the shoddy tenements built in the cities experiencing rapid industrial growth. Government rent and building regulations made it awkward to invest capital in housing. As a result, the cities that witnessed the greatest economic growth were often some of the least developed and regulated prior to the Industrial Revolution. In short, this is a well-researched economic history that suggests free markets and property rights as being central to the Industrial Revolution while demonstrating that the government regulations often made things worse for the working poor. If you like this, you'll enjoy books by Burton Folsom, like the Myth of the Robber Barons or Empire Builders.
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