Trade in your item
Get a $8.87
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Inescapable Love of God Paperback – October 1, 1999


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$242.32 $97.54

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 236 pages
  • Publisher: Universal Publishers; 1st edition (October 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1581128312
  • ISBN-13: 978-1581128314
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #754,337 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

From the Preface: "This set of reflections is neither a textbook nor a piece of scholarly research. It neither summarizes a specific field of study for students nor advances scholarship in some area of research. It is instead (what I would call) a real book, by which I mean that in it I have tried to reach the most demanding audience of all: that of educated non-specialists. The book is in part an intellectual autobiography, in part the elaboration of an argument, and in part an attempt at persuasive writing. In these pages, I have sought to share with others, particularly those who call themselves "Christians," some of my own deepest convictions about the nature of God and the world. I have sought to work out, with some degree of consistency, the idea that the universe really is an expression of love, as some of the mystics from many traditions have always insisted."

Part I chronicles some of Talbott's early theological struggles and how he came to embrace a doctrine of universal reconciliation: the wondrous idea that God's love will inevitably triumph in the end and finally transform every created person. Part II sets forth the positive case for his contention that universalism is a plain and obvious teaching of the New Testament. And finally, Part III explores some of the logical inconsistencies in competing theological systems.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
33
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 39 customer reviews
Well written, easy to read and thorough.
Alex
Talbott puts forth the most logical, biblically grounded case for universal reconciliation one might find anywhere.
Alvin C. Grissom
This book is having a profound affect on my peace of mind, and my love for God.
Wild Bill

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

66 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Molly S. Waggoner on February 15, 2005
Format: Paperback
After acquiring a degree in Biblical & Theological Studies at a college that is steeped in the Calvinist/Arminian debate, I found myself unable to accept either theological position. While I appreciated the importance of God's sovereignty espoused by Calvinists, I could not accept the way they developed it, which seemed to create a God more interested in his own "glory" than in the wellbeing of his children. I could not worship a God who created people simply to send them to hell. On the other hand, the libertarian free will upon which Arminians insist seems necessary, but results in a rather ineffective or unloving God. Did he not foresee that so many humans would end up in hell? If not, how wise could he be? If so, why did he create in the first place? [Example: I would not have a child if I knew s/he would suffer for a lifetime, and if I "though [I am] evil" would sacrifice my desire for a child for the good of that same, as-yet-unconceived child, "how much more [would our] Father in heaven" forego creating people if he knew they would suffer eternally (idea based on Mt. 7:11/Lk. 11:13)?] If the "traditional" understanding of hell is true, I see no way of getting around these issues, and Mr. Talbott seems to appreciate this dilemma. I found myself thinking, "YES!" as he objected to assumptions that go all but unquestioned by the majority of Christians. In other words, he really thinks critically about Christian doctrine, rather than simply swallowing certain aspects of it without considering potential problems and contradictions within then.

Fortunately, there is a way to maintain both God's ultimate sovereignty and human freedom... and simultaneously affirm that all will be saved! Mr.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
68 of 70 people found the following review helpful By Dean Britton on March 10, 2004
Format: Paperback
After witnessing 9/11 firsthand, I reflected on my faith with many others in NYC, while criticizing Islam for believing that non-Muslims were "infidels" worthy of death. My non-Christian friends responded "Youu Christians say the same thing - believe in Jesus, or burn in hell forever". Well, yeah, but we try not to think or talk about it too much. (Not an acceptable answer) This led to hours of biblical study and reflection, which culminated in finding this book.
I believe in the inerrancy of Scripture, the reality of hell, and the ultimate and universal Triumph of Christ over Hell, Death and Sin. Talbott lays out this belief in a way that is strongly biblically supported and rigorously (!) logical. He also lays out the historical reasons for the theological ascendency Augustinian/Calvinist doctrine, with it's Biblically dubious doctrine of "limited atonement" (wherein Christ asks that you love your neighbor, but He Himself may not if they are not "elect".)
This is not a "tree-hugger" book. This is a book for serious Christians and seekers of all types who have difficulty reconciling their personal experience of God's Character with the implications of mainline Protestant theology.
Is God both All-Loving and All-Powerful? A robust and well-argued "Yes!"
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
68 of 70 people found the following review helpful By M. McClung on November 7, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read Talbott's book ("studied" and "absorbed" might be better words than just "read") after studying "If Grace is True" by Pastors Phillip Gulley & James Mulholland. Both of these books are arguments for a Universalist view of the Gospel -- that is, God will through His love and grace ultimately reconcile all persons to Himself; some people may end up in a place of punishment such as Hell for a time, but that will not be permanent and everlasting. If I found Gulley & Mulholland's book to be compelling (and I certainly did for the most part), Talbott's is twice as good. "The Inescapable Love of God" is more systematically researched, more Biblically-based, more scholarly in every way than "If Grace Is True." Talbott is a professor of philosophy and religion at a university in Oregon, and eagerly embraces his belief in Jesus and a love for Christianity. His background in philosophy allows him to apply the best logic I've ever heard or read to the study of Christianity. Plus, Talbott doesn't have that wacky, radical view of the role of Jesus that Gulley & Mulholland offer in chapter five of "If Grace Is True."
Talbott, Gulley, and Mulholland offer a refreshing and logical view of Christianity that I certainly welcome having spent thirty years in the Baptist church where much of the time the only incentive and motivation taught for becoming a Christian was/is fear.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
33 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
I find this book a superb overview of the Christian case for belief in the ultimate victory of the love of God -- over every trace of sin, pain, death and hell. Talbott is a philosophy professor in a secular university, but he is also a Christian who knows the Bible and church history extremely well. He shares his own journey from traditional belief in eternal loss to his belief that in the end (which is in a sense the beginning) God's love will prevail and no one will be lost. Rigorous thinking, careful research, excellent writing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search