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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on May 17, 1999
A cheap book and an easy read. Author makes good points about importance of charisma and clarity in personal presentation, but outside of providing generalities doesn't help:Knowing that confidence will help "unlock my potential" won't necessarily give me that confidence. Also, anecdotal evidence (the only type offered) suffers from questionable research: e.g. the charismatic leader of Virgin Airlines, *William* Branson is a model of "business likability" so remarkable that the author forgot the guy's name is actually Richard. Similarly iffy examples litter the text. On the bright side, it's food for thought, and it's easily read on a plane.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on December 21, 1998
Toogood sets forth advice on how to maximize our potential, telling us that ultimately a person's own words will determine how far he or she can go. This is a book stressing effective communications, and we learn that CVA, Communications Value Added, is the author's designation for what we say and how we say it; it can determine the success of a person's business. So important is CVA that the author contends that the ability to inspire confidence makes us the best spokespersons for ourselves, whether we run a business, own one, or work in one. The author presents seven principles of CVA, which include never bore (the first eight seconds wins or loses the audience), give something extra in the speech (take a position, teach something), and be the master of your presentation (start and end with just you talking, no slides or logos). This book offers an important reminder of the power of words and, intelligence and competence aside, it is our words that define us. Mary Whaley
Copyright© 1997, American Library Association. All rights reserved Synopsis
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