Buy New
$10.77
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.95
  • Save: $5.18 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 18 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Integral Vision: A Very Short Introduction to the Revolutionary Integral Approach to Life, God, the Universe, and Everything Paperback – August 14, 2007


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.77
$7.79 $4.48


Frequently Bought Together

The Integral Vision: A Very Short Introduction to the Revolutionary Integral Approach to Life, God, the Universe, and Everything + A Brief History of Everything + Integral Life Practice: A 21st-Century Blueprint for Physical Health, Emotional Balance, Mental Clarity, and Spiritual Awakening
Price for all three: $40.98

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Shambhala (August 14, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590304756
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590304754
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 5.8 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #42,876 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Philosopher, psychologist and mystic Wilber (A Brief History of Everything) delivers on the subtitle's far-reaching promise. In a scant 200+ pages chock-full of handsome illustrations and spare, Zen-like diagrams and tables, he forges ahead on his established path, posing, What if we attempted to find the critically essential keys to human growth, based on the sum total of human knowledge now open to us? His answer is a kind of meta-structure of human experience and, more importantly, human potential. His Integral Map, or Integral Operating System (IOS), of quadrants, levels, lines, states, and types is drawn from developmental psychology, worldviews, multiple intelligences, gender studies, the nature of consciousness, etc. If this sounds heady and extremely ambitious, it is. Wilber asserts that the IOS approach to life permits all fields of endeavor at last to speak with one another in a common language. Clearly, however, spirituality dominates much of his thought. Not for the faint of brain, Wilber's work is still accessible and at times surprisingly practical. Some language spirals up majestically, recalling great Eastern texts. Reminiscent in spirit and watershed import of Ram Dass's Be Here Now, Wilber's work may well become a popular classic for explorers on the frontiers of humanity. (Aug. 14)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Named one of Publishers Weekly's Best Books of the Year 2007.

"Philosopher, psychologist, and mystic Wilber delivers on the subtitle's far-reaching promise. . . . Chock full of handsome illustrations and spare, Zen-like diagrams and tables, Wilber's work here is still accessible and at times surprisingly practical. Some language spirals up majestically, recalling great Eastern texts. Reminiscent in spirit and watershed import of Ram Dass's Be Here Now, Wilber may well have created a popular classic for explorers on the frontiers of humanity."—Publishers Weekly

"[Wilber's] heady multidimensional approach is deciphered in this spiffy full-color paperback filled with pop culture graphics, tables, and charts. If you are interested in consciousness, complexity, maps, multiple intelligences, and more, here is a comprehensive philosophy that puts it all together."—Spirituality and Health

More About the Author

Ken Wilber is one of the most widely read and influential American philosophers of our time. His recent books include "A Brief History of Everything", "The Marriage of Sense and Soul" and "Grace and Grit".

Customer Reviews

It's very easy to read and the format is bright and captivating (almost like a comic book.)
MKReinem
This is perhaps the most visually-appealing introduction to Integral Thinking to-date by American philosopher and spiritual teacher Ken Wilber.
Oscar Del Santo
The book claims to provide one with the experience of integral phenomenon and I found it sorely lacking in that promise.
Renee S. Oglesbee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

91 of 94 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Richard G. Petty on August 30, 2007
Format: Paperback
I have been studying and enjoying Ken Wilber's writings for almost thirty years, so I am not a total newbie.

I have also liked the way in which, over the years, Ken has not been afraid to revise his position as new information and new insights have appeared. He has also reached a place familiar to anyone who is trying to push the envelope in any field:
At what point do you simplify to clarify?
When do you take the key components of a model or system and break it down into digestible chunks without dumbing it down or selling out?
And finally, how do you present it in a way that makes sense to people outside your narrow field?

Many philosophers and theorists simply do not bother: they write long treatises that will only be understood by a few of their peers, and as for explaining to the world at large? Forget it!

This short and visually stunning book lays out the bare bones of the most recent incarnation of Ken Wilber's model of life, the universe and everything. Here you will learn the basics about "quadrants," "levels," "lines," states" and "types." Not only what they are, but also why an understanding of them can pay enormous dividends in your own life and in providing insights into your personal psychological and spiritual development, as well as that of your children, family and society.

Nobody, least of all Ken himself, believes that this is the only model, or that the map is the same as the territory. But the model can be immensely valuable. Time alone will tell how well it can incorporate new data and insights without becoming a meta-theory that sounds good but has no predictive value. For that is where this whole project will live or die: its ability to predict and to be falsifiable.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
63 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Ted Saad on August 19, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having been an avid reader of Wilber's books for years, I have been deeply moved by his philosophy as it has helped me orientate and weave multiple perspectives in coherent and compelling way. Although this is far from my favorite book of his, I applaud it for what it is meant to be: a primer on integral theory for someone that is new to it and isn't ready to dive in too deeply. This is something I have been looking for a while, as I have often recommended Wilber's work to friends. When asked what was the first book they should read, I would often suggest "Brief History of Everything" (the abridged version to "Sex, Ecology, and Spirituality"). Still, for many of my friends not accustomed to reading philosophy, they felt that "Brief History" was a bit much.

"The Integral Vision" hits the right note for just about everyone, as it goes down easier than most of Ken's work, but still gets its point across thoroughly. This is still not light-weight material, however, most readers will find the attractive illustrations helpful and crisp non-academic prose refreshing. "The Integral Vision" also demonstrates that integral theory passes the "mother-in-law test": the idea that if you can't explain it simply and succinctly to her, it's probably too complicated and nonsensical to use. Any decent theory needs to be elegant for intellectuals and simplistic enough for everyone else. "The Integral Vision" successfully lays out quadrants, levels, lines, states, and types in both a manner of elegance and ease.

With integral theory, Wilber has brought something of a gift, albeit "true, but partial" (as he would put it), that has built on many philosophical foundations and resealed some cracks in the process. "The Integral Vision" is worth a look for newbies and Wilber fans who are looking for a gift read for friends.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
42 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Nathaniel T. Parsons on October 6, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ken Wilber is a genius at synthesizing vast amounts of knowledge and human experience and thought and pulling them together into a single, coherent system. Everyone should know his work. The problem is, he sucks at trying to talk about it to normal people. Every time I read one of these attempts, I have to cringe as I imagine "wilber virgins" reading it. His most successful attempt so far I would have to say is "The Marriage of Sense and Soul", which doesn't go as far as this book (it's a much older work) but is MUCH easier to digest.

In this book Wilber tries so hard to be accessible he seems to be forcing a mickey mouse face on top of a buckminster fuller dome. I would steer people who want an "introduction" to Wilber away from this book and toward "A Theory Of Everything". Or do some pushups and take on Sex Ecology Spirituality if you've got the guts (I haven't yet). The thing is... given what Wilber has managed to do -- which is enormous and ground breaking in its scale and depth -- one can hardly expect him to re-learn how to talk to normal everyday idiots. But in my opinion, this book is damaged by its author's voice, which veers unevenly between being cute (ie. accessible) cursory (giving a shallow version of his ideas) and confusing (leaping into the deep end). The 'stoned kid with photoshop' graphics are mostly gratuitous and are there to break up text rather than add a layer of meaning or illustrate anything. The net effect is to preach to converts and not reach a new public, which was obviously his intent. I also think the structure of this book is flawed, getting too "spiritual/new age" too early.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews