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The International Space Station: Building for the Future (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration) Paperback – July 24, 2008

3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0387781440 ISBN-10: 0387781447 Edition: 2008th

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The International Space Station: Building for the Future (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration) + Creating the International Space Station (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration)
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Editorial Reviews

Review

From the reviews:

“This new volume picks up the story with the launch of STS-108 which delivered the Expedition 4 crew to the station in December 2001. … given readers a good, detailed account of the missions and the construction activity, and the various problems inevitably encountered, which the crews and their support teams on Earth overcame. There are a good number of photos from the missions … . Several appendices give a comprehensive list of acronyms used … . All in all, a useful book … .” (David Maclennan, Liftoff, Issue 260, November-December, 2010)

About the Author

John Catchpole is a freelance writer specialising in human spaceflight history. In addition to co-authoring Creating the International Space Station, he is also the author of Project Mercury - NASA's First Manned Space Programme and has published over 150 magazine articles on the subject of human spaceflight and spaceflight history, including many in Spaceflight, a monthly magazine published by the British Interplanetary Society.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 389 pages
  • Publisher: Praxis; 2008 edition (July 24, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0387781447
  • ISBN-13: 978-0387781440
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 0.9 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,306,896 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By astrofan on February 10, 2013
Format: Paperback
As a basic overview of the history of building the International Space Station, it's not bad. But it gets some dates and acronyms wrong (or at least different from what I see on the NASA website) and it misspells a few of the names of the astronauts involved. To Mr. Catchpole (if you read these), maybe do a revised edition that catches some of these errors and makes updates and I might boost it another star or two.
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By Per Ekman on February 27, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book briefly describes all the ISS Expeditions and their supporting Shuttle, Soyuz and Progress launches from Expedition 4 to 16. It is continuation of Creating the International Space Station.

I would consider this a reference book, for space buffs only, as it seems to be mostly a condensation of the flight logs. It is quite dry (so much so that the occasional expressed opinion is a bit jarring) but gives a good picture of the construction process. For me, this was exactly what I expected and looked for so I was satisfied with my purchase.

This is not a journalistic description of the construction of ISS in the style of the excellent Dragonfly: NASA And The Crisis Aboard Mir by Bryan Burrough or Leaving Earth by Robert Zimmerman. That sadly remains to be written.

If you have read "Creating the International Space Station" then you know exactly what to expect. If you haven't, then I suggest that you start with that.
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5 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Dennis E. Henley on April 23, 2009
Format: Paperback
I was about to buy this book when I decided to take a look at the pages available through the Look Inside feature.

On the first page I read this sentence: "It was not always so, the American-led effort to build a space station with its political allies in Europe and Japan began as an attempt to construct a station that would be better than the Soviet-launched Mir space station."

Not only is this a run-on sentence ("It was not always so" should be a separate sentence), the next subject ("effort") is in disagreement with "its political allies".This could have been corrected to read: "America's effort to build a space station with her political allies..."

Okay, I thought. I'm being picky.

Within a couple of pages I encounter: "When the first female American astronauts began training in Russia they were disrespected by their hosts, many Russians joked that Shannon Lucid was flying to Mir, because it was dirty and required cleaning."

Again this is a run-on sentence. The first sentence should end after hosts. There is no need for any comma in the second sentence that starts with Many Russians.

Finally, a page or so on I read: "The clash of cultures was perhaps felt most by the American astronauts, many of whom, on being removed from their families and relocated to Russia felt isolated."

This is missing the comma after Russia.

Nit picky? Well, if the writing is flawed, how can I trust the information? Doesn't a company like Springer have editors?

I did not buy this book.
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The International Space Station: Building for the Future (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration)
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