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The Interpretation of Dreams: The Complete and Definitive Text Paperback – February 23, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 688 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; First Trade Paper Edition edition (February 23, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465019773
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465019779
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,132 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"What a delight, then, to have a new translation of 'The Interpretation of Dreams,' on ethat strips off the scientistic veneer and gives us a Freud who is fresh and alive.... Lovely translation." --The New York Times Book Review


--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Language Notes

Text: Greek, English --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) is one of the twentieth century's greatest minds and the founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology. His many works include The Ego and the Id; An Outline of Psycho-Analysis; Inhibitions; Symptoms and Anxiety; New Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis; Civilization and Its Discontent, and others.

Customer Reviews

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It's a must for anyone interested in psychology as I am.
Mauro A. Rinaldi
This is a very interesting book although I do find the diction and sentence structure somewhat hard to read even at college level.
Tylertravels
"Transport me", is what I require of each and every author, needing to see it in my mind's eye.
BookBuff

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Steve Proctor on November 15, 2012
Format: Paperback
As a psychotherapist I recognize that dreams are not the doorway to the unconscious but rather the window to the unconscious mind, its desires, impulses, and motivations. People like to give their egos and conscious minds too much credit for the decisions and actions in their daily lives. One must take into consideration that the average person has about 80,000 thoughts per day and according to most psychologists about 95% of those are repetitive thoughts that also occurred in their conscious mind yesterday or the day before. This helps to illustrate that we are, for the most part, driving on auto pilot in our daily lives. This begs the question of who is in charge, or as biologist Bruce Lipton has phrased it, "who is the wizard behind the curtain" in our choices and actions in our lives? The answer to this is question is that our unconscious minds are the real driver and pilot navigating our lives and not our conscious mind that is thinking redundant thoughts, like a broken record, throughout most of our day.

In order to gain a better understanding of the `wizard behind the curtain"--the pilot of our lives-- we must be willing to take an honest and uncensored examination and assessment of our dreams. It is in our dreams, when our conscious mind is unable to censor our true desires and motivations, that the "wizard" is revealed to us. Strachey's translation of Freud's "The Interpretation of Dreams: The Complete and Definitive Text" provides an excellent and comprehensive foundation to the topic of understanding, deciphering, and interpreting and understanding how our unconscious reveals itself to us via our dreams.

While some reviewers have stated that Strachey's translation is hard to read and has too many "archaic words" and lengthy sentences, I would have to disagree.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mauro A. Rinaldi on February 4, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In my opinion, one of Freud's best pieces of work. It's a must for anyone interested in psychology as I am.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By IAN BURMAN on July 10, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Master's 1899/1900 original thesis remains as a testimony of his brilliant observations.
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By Sharon on July 15, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wasn't what I was expecting. I was hoping for something a little more refined
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By cornell wesley on July 10, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
thanks
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18 of 29 people found the following review helpful By IK JONG LEE on July 10, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book was wonderfully organized for those who would like to read ancient Greek texts. We can read Plato's Apology without looking up the Greek dictionary. In the appendices, some Sentence Diagrams,table of the tense of the verbs of the Principal Parts, Word Frequency List, and the Vocabulary List were provided.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Israel Drazin TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 28, 2010
Format: Paperback
The philosopher Plato, born in 427 BCE narrates the trial and death of his seventy year old teacher Socrates in 399 BCE in Athens, Greece in four of his dialogues. Socrates was accused of impiety and of corrupting the youth. The general consensus among today's historians and scholars is that Socrates was innocent of the charges against him. However, the citizens of Athens felt differently during his time. Socrates was found guilty, was imprisoned, was able to meet with and talk with his friends before his death, and died by drinking hemlock given to him by his executioner.

Plato presents Socrates' defense of himself, which is quite persuasive. We will focus on one item: Socrates' reactions to his impending death. It is one of several early discussions about death.

The Apology reports Socrates thought about life after death and Phaedo quotes his last words. Both show his courage and fine character.

In The Apology, Socrates' friends are surprised that he is taking his impending death so calmly. One friend asks him what he thinks happens to people after their death. Socrates admits that he does not know, but sees two possibilities: either there is no afterworld or there is one. If there is no afterworld, there is nothing to worry about. Death will be like a dreamless sleep. Even the riches people on earth, who have all kinds of possessions and enjoy all kinds of activities and pleasures, delight in an undisturbed sleep. If, on the other hand, there is an afterlife, there is again no concern. The dead will enjoy meeting acquaintances and heroes of old; it will be a truly enjoyable and learning experience. Understanding this, he explained, he had no need to fear death; on the contrary, either way, there will be nothing bad after death.
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12 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Steven H. Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on August 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
Freud stated in the Foreword to the Third English Edition of this book (his first major "solo" effort, after his co-authoship with Josef Breuer of Studies On Hysteria (Basic Books Classics)), "This book, with the new contribution to psychology which surprised the world when it was published (1900), remains essentially unaltered. It contains, even according to my present-day judgment, the most valuable of all the discoveries it has been my good fortune to make. Insight such as this falls to one's lot but once in a lifetime."

Here are some representative quotations from the book:

"I have already subjected perhaps more than a thousand dreams to interpretation, but I do not wish to use this material now as an introduction to the technique of dream-interpretation. For ... I should lay myself open to the objection that these are the dreams of neuropaths, so that the conclusions drawn from them would not apply to the dreams of healthy persons..."
"We should then assume that in every human being there exist, as the primary cause of dream-formation, two psychic forces (tendencies or systems), one of which forms the wish expressed by the dream, while the other exercises a censorship over this dream-wish, thereby enforcing on it a distortion. The question is, what is the nature of this second agency by virtue of which it is able to exercise its censorship?"
"In the psychic life there exist, as we have seen, repressed wishes, which belong to the first system, and to whose fulfillment the second system is opposed.
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