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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
on November 27, 2009
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Whatever this book is or will be recognized to be, it is one of a kind. Literally every sentence in the book is a question. What amazed and delighted me is that it's actually a good read! Not just because it is witty, captivating, touching and beautifully written... there are more examples of all that. I was reminded more than once of Holden Caulfield. I could well believe that this is him badgering you with all these questions. (and in view of Salinger's easy access to lawyers I hasten to add that this is purely my own private impression, and in no way is the author responsible.)

I believe here is a new way of storytelling, and a very interesting and rewarding one. When I got over my initial surprise (and yes, impatience) I found that instead of sort of trying to answer the questions, my brain started to go with the flow... much as I would go along with a strong, intelligent and convincing voice, not unlike those of Nabokov's Charley Kinbote or Martin Amis' John Self. But even among these giants Powell more than holds his own. The Interrogative Mood literally forces your brain to make up its own 'story', and in that sense offers a truly different and new reading experience. Much more than previous lame experiments in 'interactive' storytelling, this book needs a good reader to make it happen, to make it complete. Be that reader and you will never forget it.
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47 of 55 people found the following review helpful
on February 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover
What's the point? Is it the reader's task to somehow make sense out of a series of random questions? Is novelty enough, or should a new form justify its existence by actually accomplishing something?

How did the writer know when to start a new paragraph? Isn't a paragraph supposed to have a topic sentence? Is it up to the reader to interpret the significance of the paragraph structure, too? If a paragraph on page 20 changed places with one on page 100, would you be able to tell? Can you think of any other book where you could do that and get away with it?

Amy Hempel, were you really referring to this book when you wrote that this is a "precise and beautiful novel"? In what way is this a "novel"? Do novels require characters and plot? What,exactly, did you find precise and beautiful?

Are you still interested in reading this book? Does your library have a copy? Would you really consider buying it?
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on April 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I was put off by the idea that someone could get away with writing a 'book' of just questions. As I started reading it I thought "What, no plot? No character development? How did this get published?" I can now answer this question ... because it's pretty darned funny!
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on November 20, 2009
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I had a smile on my face the whole time I was reading this book. Witty, ridiculous, droll, disarming, laugh-out-loud, original. A peek inside the author's mind: Ye gods, fella! I really loved it.
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on October 31, 2009
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
It would be tempting to think that just by experimenting with literary style, and using only questions to write an entire book, would be gimmicky and the effect of the gimmick would wear off. It doesn't. Powell has packed so many thoughts into his interrogatories that each question stimulates you to high quality thought.

I recommend it.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on August 6, 2010
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
First, I am an avid reader. Second, I am not against experimentation in writing, however this particular experiment seems to have failed. Yes, this is a book made up entirely of questions, which I think could work. You really could attempt to lead, or mislead, your reader with purpose. You could challenge assumptions and beliefs. That isn't the case here. The questions do seem random, trivial, and redundant. Also, I thought that the author was making an egotistical and unnecessary display of vocabulary. I didn't feel that the subject matter (old roller skates and stuffed animals) should have required the use of a dictionary. I really hoped for the best when I picked this book up. I could not have been more disappointed. Although, I can not say this about any other book I've ever picked up, even the two I couldn't finish (you know who you are), this book was a complete waste of my time. In fairness, I do have to say that I have not read anything else by this author. He seems a competent writer, his other works may be good.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on February 16, 2010
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Do you like spending time reflecting about your childhood? Are your childhood memories good or bad? Even if you don't remember your childhood as being happy,do you still feel you learned or gained something from it? Do you read a wide variety of books on different subjects? Have you had rich and varied life experiences? Do you like thinking about things? Does internal dialog mean anything to you?
Then jump on in-this is the book you have been waiting for: they are few and far between.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on December 29, 2009
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
A wondrously fun & rewarding reading immersion. I think you'll know by the end of the first paragraph. It actually makes some people nervous (because they immediately feel responses are required? Is it some kind of test?) I gave it to one such friend with instructions to relax & go with it - I'm curious to see whether that happens or he keeps his reading-performance anxiety throughout. Another friend tore it out of his hands and shrieked with joy...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on February 23, 2014
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I don't think there's really any reason to read this unless you're on some type of hallucinogenic drug. There's no real point whatsoever, it's just random questions. I couldn't recommend this to anyone in good conscience.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on January 9, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
What if I told you I loved this book for no particular reason?
Why should you care what I think? Will you lmk if my review pisses you off or pleases you? Are you a bird counter or a worm farmer?
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