Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Man Who Invented Flor... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book shows minor use. Cover and Binding have minimal wear and the pages have only minimal creases. A tradition of southern quality and service. All books guaranteed at the Atlanta Book Company. Our mailers are 100% recyclable.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Man Who Invented Florida (Doc Ford Novels) Mass Market Paperback – March 15, 1997


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.99
$3.24 $0.01

14th Deadly Sin
Third in the Women's Murder Club series: As violence sweeps through San Francisco, Detective Lindsay Boxer and her friends must risk their lives in the name of justice—before it's too late. Read more about authors James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
$7.99 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Man Who Invented Florida (Doc Ford Novels) + The Heat Islands: A Doc Ford Novel (Doc Ford Novels) + Captiva (Doc Ford)
Price for all three: $23.96

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In the third Doc Ford adventure, White again seamlessly splices an offbeat west coast of Florida locale with even more offbeat inhabitants. Principal among them is Doc Ford, who operates a small biological-supply business from a lab in his stilt-supported house. Lately, Doc has tried to control his telescope viewing of a tanned, red-haired woman who skinny-dips off an offshore sailboat and to limit his beer intake to four a day. While trying to be patient with his hippie pal Thomlinson, who drops by to expound on many topics, Doc reluctantly gets involved with his Uncle Tucker, who lives up the coast in Mango. Tuck has discovered a well of healing water on his land that he claims is responsible for his old gelded horse's newly grown testicles. Smuggled into a local rest home, the water has dramatically revived the moribund sex life of his Native American buddy Joseph Egret. Tuck's trouble is his somewhat uncertain ownership of the land. While he importunes Doc for help, the local news focuses on the disappearance into the mangrove swamps of two government investigators and a much loathed TV fisherman. Like fellow Floridian Carl Hiaasen, White ( The Heat Islands ) is adept at weaving ecological concerns into an oddball narrative with no loss of steam. The fate of the three missing men, even by bizarre Florida crime fiction standards, is inspired.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Series veterans Marion "Doc" Ford and hippie friend Tomlinson ( Sanibel Flats , St. Martin's, 1990) become tangentially involved in the case of three men who go missing near Dinkin's Bay. The "victims" seem to have nothing in common except bad luck; their portion of a broader story melds with a mostly amusing plot dealing with the proposed government expansion of the Everglades National Park. White offers an eclectic vision of Florida with his laid-back prose but pays close attention to various "characters," especially Marion's braggart uncle. Upbeat, literate, fascinating, and clever: manna for deeper readers.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Doc Ford Novels (Book 3)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 294 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Paperbacks (March 15, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312953984
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312953980
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.8 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #54,708 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Randy Wayne White is the author of sixteen previous Doc Ford novels and four collections of nonfiction. He lives in an old house built on an Indian mound in Pineland, Florida.

Customer Reviews

The characters are really memorable and a real hoot.
Marjorie A. Cooper
As a historian who loves a good Florida story, this Randy Wayne White novel really tickled my funny bone.
E. Neily
I enjoyed reading this book and had a hard time putting it down once I started.
Texas reader

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By RevChrisEsq on February 14, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
One reviewer posted that "even an average Doc Ford story is better than most". While that's certainly true, I'm not sure this is an "average" Doc Ford story--it's just different.
Because it's barely about Doc Ford. Oh sure he appears here and there and sort of rescues the situation at the end. But the story is really about Doc's uncle and his Indian friend/co hort.
Which by the way, does make this the funniest in the Doc Ford series.
Having read every one of the 10 Doc Ford books as of end of 2003, here's my list of how they all rate, (drum roll, please):
(5 stars)
Captiva
Twelve Mile Limit
Shark River
The Heat Islands
Ten Thousand Islands
Sanibal Flats (the first in the series)
The following are the 4 stars in the series--great stories, but I wouldn't recommend them as a first read of the author:
Everglades
The Man Who Invented Florida
North of Havana
The Mangrove Coast
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jack Dempsey on November 28, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As has been said countless times here, this is a different type of Doc Ford book. Perhaps I did somewhat of a disservice to myself---I started my love of (fictional) Randy Wayne White with "The Ten Thousand Islands." I then worked my way backwards to "The Mangrove Coast," "Captiva," and "North of Havana." I have yet to pick up "Sanibel Flats," but I plan to very soon.
Each of those aforementioned books (with the exception of "Sanibel Flats" and the present review) is Doc Ford tales in the first person. This book is told from the third person. It is a somewhat difficult transition to make. The same is true for "Sanibel Flats"---I've discovered that from a cursory glance at it.
Doc Ford works so brilliantly in the first person, it's hard to accept anything else. Perhaps it sounds a bit odd, but it causes a little alienation to arise between the reader and the character that is Doc Ford. In other words, the reader does not feel as "inside" the character. Presumably this is intentional, but it is difficult coming from the more recent Ford tales to the earlier ones.
That aside, this isn't a typical Doc Ford novel either. It places a bigger spotlight on Tucker Gatrell (Ford's uncle) and his "friend" Joseph Egret. But it is a Ford adventure nonetheless, and it is a (...) good one at that. Randy Wayne White is an absolute master of this genre, and, as many reviewers state, is the definite heir apparent to the throne of John D. MacDonald/Travis McGee.
Definitely pick this one up at some point. Start from the beginning and work your way forward rather than vice-versa. And, definitely pick up his non-fictional works as well. They are absolutely amazing. I can't wait until his new non-fiction work is released in January.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By E. Neily on October 3, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As a historian who loves a good Florida story, this Randy Wayne White novel really tickled my funny bone. I was not at all put off that it was not a "typical" White novel, but enjoyed every minute of its bizarre twists and turns, its leg-pullin' blended with understandings of Florida's environmental systems. I found it captivating from start to finish. Having waded into the heart of the Fakahatchee Strand, slogged through mangrove swamps in Tampa Bay, and searched Florida archives, I can relate to much of White's tale. This is probably not a book for city-slickers, but by reading it Florida's northern transplants might learn a few lessons as to why Florida is so incredible.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 20, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Having just finished reading "The Heat islands", I was looking forward to tagging along with Doc Ford on another detective adventure.
Well, even though the Doc starts out strong, he quickly fades to a secondary character.
The book is funny, and is evocative of the "Florida lost" ala John D. MacDonald and Carl Hiaasen. I'm probably a little too critical because I was expecting a variation on a theme and didn't get it
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By James L. Woolridge VINE VOICE on December 6, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Doc Ford books are some of my favorite beach reads. I like Randy Wayne White's characters and his ecology lessons. That said this is the third in the Ford series and no doubt the book that has less Doc and Tomlinson, his pal, and we get Ford's Uncle Tucker Gatrell and his friend Joseph Egret. The story about a fountain of youth is really laugh out loud funny. Great characters, and humor, alas, less Doc. I still recommend it and if you are reading the set of Doc's books, three is a must. By the by, read the books in order.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By col2910 on June 14, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Synopsis/blurb.......

When solitary marine biologist Doc Ford focused his telescope on the woman in the white boat, he didn't know his life was about to be capsized: that his conniving uncle Tucker Gatrell would discover the Fountain of Youth, that The National Enquirer would write about it, and that the law would beat down his door in search of three missing men.

But Doc Ford is about to find these things out -- the hard way. Because in the shadowy world of Southwest Florida, where gators yawn, cattle craze, and Indian bones are buried, mysteries great and small have found the man to solve them.

My 3rd read in the author's Doc Ford series, and also the slowest, the weakest and the least enjoyable. I was probably 120 pages into this one before scratching my head and asking myself what is the mystery or crime or raison d'être for this 300-odd page long book? When will something happen, other than the mundane, the boring or the everyday?

At the end of the book, I wasn't particularly enlightened or bothered. Doc Ford, likeable and interesting takes a back-seat role to his uncle. His uncle wasn't anyone that stirred any strong emotions in me, either positive or negative and so the book was a bit of a damp squib or squid, keeping the marine theme going.

Amusing in places, but it was dull as dishwasher in many more, unfortunately.

Best line in the book........"When politicians looked at old people, all they saw was saggy skin wrapped around a voting finger."

Not worth all my time invested for that little gem, back next month with Captiva - book number 4. Boy I can hardly wait! There was a 3 year gap in between books 3 and 4 - 1993-96 so hopefully Mr White had plenty of time to sharpen his pencil and re-focus on what made the first two more enjoyable.

2 stars from 5 for this one.

I bought it second-hand on Amazon a month or two
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Man Who Invented Florida (Doc Ford Novels)
This item: The Man Who Invented Florida (Doc Ford Novels)
Price: $7.99
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: two guys one horse