Engineering & Transportation
Qty:1
  • List Price: $32.99
  • Save: $9.86 (30%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Book Robot
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Light shelf and edge wear to cover. Pages are clean and crisp, no marks.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Invention That Changed the World: How a Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technical Revolution Paperback – March 23, 1998


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$23.13
$14.78 $0.04
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

The Invention That Changed the World: How a Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technical Revolution + A Radar History of World War II: Technical and Military Imperatives
Price for both: $101.66

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Touchstone; Reprint edition (March 23, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684835290
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684835297
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.4 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #177,584 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Without the invention of radar, Europe--and possibly even the world--might today be under Fascist rule. This well-written, technically accurate, and even exciting account captures the urgency of the race to win World War II, the people behind the magnetrons, screens and antennae, and the use of radar in the cold war. Another extraordinary volume from the Sloan Foundation Technology Series, and Highly Recommended. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

As the former technology editor for Business Week, Buderi understands his complex subject well enough to render it clear without oversimplifying it. The first half of his book makes a strong case that the atomic bomb only ended WWII?it was radar that won it. Radar tipped the balance in the Battle of Britain, at Midway and in the Solomons. Radar haunted the U-boats and helped control the V-1 attacks of 1944-45. Meanwhile, radar countermeasures and navigation systems set the stage for the D-Day landings. Buderi tells this story well, with an unusual ability to describe technical subjects in language a nonspecialist can comprehend. In the second half of the book, he devotes half a dozen chapters to biographical sketches of key, albeit little-known, participants in the wartime radar program. Finally, the author brings to center stage radar technology's contributions to the Cold War and to space astronomy. While this concluding discussion is informative, it scants other areas influenced by radar. Subjects such as air-traffic control and weather reporting deserve better than relegation to an epilogue. Overall, this is a vigorous history, but an unfocused one. Photos, not seen by PW.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

FIVE STARS for Robert Buderi's book.
Tom Brody
This part takes up the first 245 pages of the book, is extremely well organized and plays out the complete development and deployment of radar during World War II.
Fred
It is a splendid book, with a great story and very good technical details.
Eng Francisco Fernandes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Fred on December 4, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is really two books in one, the first being an outline of the development of radar immediately prior to and during World War II. This part takes up the first 245 pages of the book, is extremely well organized and plays out the complete development and deployment of radar during World War II. This early part takes you through the people and organizations that were behind radar's development, as well as a very top level view of the technology used to create the device. The author walks you through a very good description of radar's development on a global scale, outlining how the US and UK led the development, why Germany was only slightly further behind, and why Japan was so lagging. Mr. Buderi takes several major battles, including the Battle of Britain, the Battle of the Bulge and the Battle of Midway, and outlines the significance of radar in those battles and how it truly was the winning weapon of the war. This part of the book clearly rates 5 stars, and makes the whole text worth purchasing.
The second part of the book, which takes up the final 233 pages, is less organized and much less linear in its thought development. While this lack of organization does reflect the decentralization of radar development following WWII, it does not make this section any easier to read. While the development or radar as an astronomical tool, its deployment and adoption at civilian airports and the use of its underlying technologies in the development of integrated circuit are all significant, their depiction as essential parts of the story is lacking. The second part ranks 2 stars, and is good reference material, but should be read on a chapter by chapter basis, as that appears to be how they were written.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By wboyd@netdex.com on October 16, 1998
Format: Paperback
After all these years (1942-1998) I see at last an account of the work we did at Sydney University Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Radiophysics Lab! I was a Navy 2nd Class Radarman assigned to develop electronic countermeasures items (electronic warfare). This book tells it like it was! It rang so true to me that I was carried back once again to my three years on that assignment under Gen Douglas MacArthur, as a member of the ECM group. If you want to know what we did, and many others around the world in this super-secret assignment, Buderi has captured it beautifully. No one person or group "won" the war, but the part played by those involved in radar most certainly changed its course toward the eventual outcome so little appreciated today. --wboyd@netdex.com
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By DickStanley. on March 2, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is one of the most accessible books to explore this war-winning and world-changing technology and some of the principal people behind it. Which could be because much of it still is a military secret. The aluminum "chaff," for instance, first used to confuse enemy radar still is in use and has hardly changed in sixty-five years.

Buderi's almost entire focus on the Rad Lab at MIT is regrettable, however, not because it wasn't important, but because there were many more contributions. The Navy had good working surface radars in action well before MIT got around to improving them, a detail that has surfaced time and again in the war memoirs of the past fifty years, particularly those of Edward P. Stafford. Buderi also never really gets around to explaining why the Japanese and the Germans were so far behind. Particularly when the Germans had one of the longest leads of all, starting in 1904 with Duesseldorf engineer Christian Huelsmeyer.

Buderi dismisses Huelsmeyer's "Telemobiloscope" as merely preliminary. But the invention to prevent ships from colliding in bad weather had all the ingredients except the cathode ray tube, which hadn't been developed yet. Nevertheless, Buderi's book is a good read and worth your time and money. It's a murky subject well worth exploring and his effort is illuminating, if incomplete.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 19, 1997
Format: Hardcover
Before I read this book, I (like most technically minded people) knew of Los Alamos and the development of the atomic bomb, and had a vague impression that MIT was working on radar during this same time. What I *didn't* know was that radar development was an equally urgent crash program, with a similarly brilliant scientific staff (11 future Nobel prizes), and lots more practical applications. Furthermore, compared to Los Alamos, they faced and overcame many additional challenges - among them starting mass production of brand new technology, and convincing the military to change their doctrines based on new technical capabilities.

Like Rhodes's "The Making of the Atomic Bomb", the story is told in chronological order, mixing the human and technical aspects and conveying the urgency and suspense of a desperate wartime situation. Unlike Rhodes's book, it follows the people and technology further, showing how the (then young) scientists went on to fame and fortune, and how the technology has changed our daily life. The book is engrossing even for non-specialists - my wife (a chiropractor) picked it up to see what I found so fascinating, and I couldn't get it back!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews