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The Invisible Landscape: Mind, Hallucinogens, and the I Ching Paperback – April 22, 1994


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The Invisible Landscape: Mind, Hallucinogens, and the I Ching + Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge A Radical History of Plants, Drugs, and Human Evolution
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: HarperOne; Reprint edition (April 22, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062506358
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062506351
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #135,123 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Terrence McKenna has spent twenty-five years exploring "the ethnopharmacology of spiritual transformation" and is a specialist in the ethnomedicine of the Amazon basin. He is coauthor, with his brother Dennis, of The Invisible Landscape: Mind, Hallucinogens, and the I Ching, and the author of Food of the Gods.


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

89 of 94 people found the following review helpful By Ross James Browne on June 2, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
_The Invisible Landscape_ by Terence and Dennis Mckenna is a highly modernized, up-to-date version of Jungian psychotherapy with an emphasis on brain-chemistry at the molecular level. Mckenna has fascinating theories on the nuances and inner workings of the subatomic particles within the DNA molecules in the human brain. According to Mckenna, the behavior of the atoms within our DNA actually determines the very nature of our conscious existence. Specifically, the patterns in which the electrons orbit the atomic nuclei in our DNA atoms form an Analog representation of what we are seeing; the electrons themselves move in such a manner as to create a type of morse-code which translates our sense perceptions into conscious being. This "analog theory of the brain" represents the crowning achievement of this book. The vibrations of the subtomic particles in our brain create reality in the same way in which digital and analog code create images on a computer screen.
But all of this has yet to be proved. Nevertheless, _The Invisible Landscape_ is a modern masterpiece of speculative philosophy/psychology. It represents the outermost reaches of far-seeing speculative theory. It is, therefore, a welcome departure from more conservative forms of thinking. Terence Mckenna also tries his hand at claivoyant soothsaying, providing the reader with his own unique doomsday prophecy loosely based on the hexagrams of the I-Ching. This so-called "timewave zero" graph maps the cycles of cultural and social "novelty" mankind has experienced over history. Suffice it to say that this theory is still open to debate.
Overall, the analog theory of mind, along with the "holographic theory of mind", make this book worth reading.
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53 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Brian Wallace (Co-author of It's Not Your Hair) on October 21, 2002
Format: Paperback
a razzle dazzle trip through math, mysticism and madness that will surely make the poet rejoice while the "rational" scientist churns. Among McKenna's work, I find this one to require the greatest stretch or leap of the imagination - which makes it one of my favorites!
To fully enjoy and understand the brilliance of McKenna, one must open up their intuition and greatest capacity for open-mindedness. We are dealing with visionaries musing at the extremes and blissing out with philosophic rapture or torture at almost every turn. These are experiences way beyond the "realities" most will ever know.
Another remarkable capacity of Terence was his ability to spin the words in a way that adventurously captures the essence of the experience while entertaining his readers literally BEYOND BELIEF!
As for the entheogen-cynics that knocked McKenna: He had more insight and made more contribution than all the cynics put together.
Long live his indomitable spirit!
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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Phillip Schuman on April 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
Terence McKenna and his brother relate their experience with a South American psychoactive plant, and the mind-blowing (mind-blown?) insights that they gained from it. The I Ching's 'King Wen sequence' of the 64 hexagrams is interpreted as a digital code, and in fractal geometry-like fashion, concatenated onto itself to create a wave function for the entirety of the universe, with its peaks and minima related to rises and falls in the rate of 'novelty' in reality as different dimensional realities interpenetrate in the McKennas' version of 'the end of the world as we know it.'
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By S. LiPera on April 5, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The authors have a great hypothesis regarding the relationship between consciousness, neurochemistry, quantum mechanics, and the I Ching, but they get bogged down in a writing style that seems aimed at a very narrow segment. There is no need to write in such a way as to confuse readers. If they had decided to write a book more accessible to the average reader in its style, I believe that their ideas would be more widely known and believed today. As it is, I doubt that more than several hundred people have any idea of the connections that they have made.
Overall, just a shame to lose such a great idea.
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19 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Michael on January 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed this book tremendously. When combined with other reading materials, I think this book gaines value. The authors give a general overview into what the popular world would refer to as "mystic". This is a good book to read for a general reconfirmation of quasi-cosmology. The math is a bit strewn together, and there are many leaps of faith, but all in all the book presents a glimpse of the magic which can be harnessed by everyone one of us, but the journey is taken on by only a few. According to the authors, however, everyone will soon be aware that the journey was always taking place.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mick Bysshe on July 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
I felt when reading this book 14 years ago that it was three books in one: the first comparing shamanism with schizophrenia, the second a chemistry text, and the third a somewhat awkward positioning of a template onto the King Wen sequence of the I Ching. The chemistry stuff was over my head, but I appreciated the fine line drawn between shamanism and schizophrenia. I learned nothing about electronic spin resonance unfortunately despite getting at least a B in high school chemistry.
Having had some struggles with both shamanistic practices and mental illness is part of the daily grind some of us go through and it is the psychiatrist who tries to come up with the magic pills to assist the processes of both.
I have done I Ching divinations in the past using 49 pennies and I am not too sure that we need to look for patterns there. Take it with a grain of salt. Same with any changes in brain chemistry due to what you ingest.
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