The Invisibles Vol. 4: Bloody Hell In America and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$13.19
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $1.80 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Tuesday, April 22? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The Invisibles Vol. 4: Bloody Hell in America Paperback


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.19
$7.67 $6.39

Frequently Bought Together

The Invisibles Vol. 4: Bloody Hell in America + The Invisibles Vol. 3: Entropy in the UK + The Invisibles Vol. 5: Counting to None
Price for all three: $42.27

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 104 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo; Cmc edition (February 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563894440
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563894442
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 6.7 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #336,974 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Grant Morrison is one of comics' greatest innovators. His long list of credits includes Batman: Arkham Asylum, JLA, Seven Soldiers, Animal Man, Doom Patrol, The Invisibles and The Filth. He is currently writing Batman and All-Star Superman.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 15 customer reviews
This is a very interesting graphic novel.
David Ross
His art is detailed, clean, precise, and beautifully rendered; everything you could ask for, really.
Joe Kenney
IF you dont want violence or object to a little bad language or drug use, DONT READ THIS BOOK.
rob Stites

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Joe Kenney on March 15, 2005
Format: Paperback
After the release of issue #25 of the Invisibles (collected in Book 3: "Entropy in the UK"), DC/Vertigo halted publication of the series for a few months. During this hiatus, creator/writer Grant Morrison revised his approach to the series. Deciding that the previous volume had been "British" and that the new one would be "American," Morrison abandoned the methodical pace of Volume 1 and filled Volume 2 with nonstop action, sex, and ultraviolence. Some say this new approach was a "watered down" version of the Invisibles, but I say that's hogwash. The stories collected in this book are the cream of the crop, and fulfill all of the promise of the very first issues of the series.

Book 4 collects the first four issues of Volume 2, and the change is immediately noticeable. First and foremost is the return of artist supreme Phil Jimenez. Last seen in Book 3's "Entropy in the UK" arc, Jimenez is probably my favorite artist who ever worked on the series. His art is detailed, clean, precise, and beautifully rendered; everything you could ask for, really. Morrison scored a huge coup when he brought Jimenez on board as the regular artist, something the series never had before. Therefore, there are no drops in artwork quality in this collection, as there were in the previous three trade paperbacks.

Picking up a year after the events at the end of Book 3, Book 4 opens with the Invisibles (King Mob, Dane, Ragged Robin, Lord Fanny, Boy) recouping in upstate New York, residing in the colossal mansion of millionaire Invisible Mason Lang. Lang is an interesting character, a neurotic Bruce Wayne-type who obsesses over the "hidden meanings" of mainstream films.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Atreides on April 11, 2005
Format: Paperback
Morrison is arguably the best comics scribe around today, and thus far Invisibles is probably (still) his masterpiece.
Bloody Hell In America continues in the same vein as the previous story arcs, though this chapter is far more violent and "action packed" than anything we've seen before (as the title implies). These stories were of course written squarely in the Tarantino Era. In the midst of some blood-soaked & carnage-filled pages, even King Mob tells Jolly Roger that he is "beginning to question the already dubious morality of [his] actions". To call the violence "gratuitous" is missing the point.
And I wouldn't call this a good jumping-on point. If you're going to read Invisibles, start at the beginning.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kevin RE Watts on March 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
The Invisibles' fourth volume begins their second major storyline in America, doing American things with American people.
Grant Morrison had just begun to write the JLA during this volume, and it affected the Invisibles to a major extent. The story becomes simpler; there are a ton of gun fights and the whole tone of the series changes. Morrison claims he did this on purpose, but it's unclear as to why he did it.
Regardless, Phil Jimenez really compliments the story's general feel, very Perez influenced and detailed, very American.
A necessary volume if you're reading the Invisibles and a very good starting point if you haven't started.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gillian on February 10, 2002
Format: Paperback
This short but sweet trade paperback colects the OTT beginings of the 2nd Volume of this wonderfull series.
This is a good introduction to the Invisibles, as this story reads like a highly entertaining, psychadelic blockbuster, making it more acessible than most of the other stories in this series, which can (at times) redifine the word "odd"...
Read it and, if you like it, check out the other trades... the series is really varied and is, literally, about EVERYTHING!
Sex, love, gnosticism, rebellion, music, art, death, friendship, drugs, science, magic, literature, meta-physics, ... its all in there somewhere...
Stories about sexy Anarchists dont get any better than this...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
This collection is meant as a jumping-on point for new readers, and considering how esoteric, deep, and complex 'The Invisibles' usually is, this book is a nice change of pace. The amazing thing is that Morrison slows down the merry-go-round without derailing it. He *wants* you to get on, but he also wants people who've been on it for a while to stay -- no mean feat. He pulls is off very well, somehow. Check this out, then dive in to the rest of this amazing, brilliant series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 18, 1999
Format: Paperback
Somewhere along the line in "Bloody Hell in America," you realize you're in over your head, that whatever well-worn turns you may have been used to in comic book storytelling have been turned completely around, and this ride is jumping the tracks.
How writer Grant Morrison manages to spin the end of time, the crash at Roswell, the Hindu god Ganesh, Aztec magic, and Quentin Tarantino movies into one story is a secret he'll probably take to his grave. But it all works, and the threads crackle and hum so intensely with pop-zeitgeist electricity you'll love getting sucked into the web.
Translation: It's really, REALLY cool. And one hell of a mind ride.
And honestly, if you can't get past the "swearing and blood," you should stick to the JLA. Or Bil Keane's Family Circus.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xb494e624)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?