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The Irish Pub Cookbook Paperback – December 15, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books (December 15, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811844854
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811844857
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 0.8 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #150,624 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Imagine walking into a 400-year-old Irish watering hole with a thatched roof and open fire, the floor strewn with timber shavings and the walls packed with bric-a-brac, sliding into a snug for a pint and a hotchpotch, and instead being served Caramelized Duck Breast with Pineapple Chutney followed by White Chocolate Terrine. As in The Irish Heritage Cookbook, Johnson continues on her mission to inform Americans that contemporary Irish cooking means not just a rustic, stick-to-your-ribs Irish Stew with Brown Soda Bread, but also Green Tomato Tarte Tatin, as original and sophisticated as one found anywhere in Europe. The book reads like a tourist itinerary for hungry pub crawlers (if only it were arranged by county and in a portable format) and shares history on favorite pubs and their famous and infamous patrons and proprietors. Leigh Beish's full-page photos deliver elegant interpretations of humble pub grub like Bacon and Cabbage, and Ploughman's Lunch. It's inevitable that the recipes cover some well-trod territory, since it's difficult to imagine an Irish cookbook omitting Shepherd's Pie, but "Blackboard Specials" like Bacon, Blue Cheese, and Courgette Soup tend toward the global gourmet, and some were even developed by Bord Bia, the Irish Food Board, to promote traditional Irish products to modern chefs and consumers. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Margaret M. Johnson writes frequently about food and travel in her ancestral home. The author of the New Irish Table (0-8118-3387-9); Irish Puddings, Tarts, Crumbles, and Fools (0-8118-4163-4); and the Irish Heritage Cookbook (0-8118-1992-2), she is an Ir

Leigh Beisch is a San Francisco based photographer. Her work has appeared in many fashion, lifestyle, and health magazines, as well as in Viva Margarita (0-8118-4022-0) and Olives, Anchovies, and Capers (0-8118-2494-2).

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Customer Reviews

The recipes are also pretty simple.
K. Hill
Not only are the recipes great, but the stories that tell of history/origins/traditions/culture/food are enjoyable to read.
Valerie Cowen
Every recipe I've tried so far has tasted very authentic to what we experienced during our visit.
Carmen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 78 people found the following review helpful By B. Marold HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on February 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
`The Irish Pub Cookbook' is the fourth Irish themed cookbook I have reviewed from Irish-American Margaret M. Johnson of New York. All four, including `The New Irish Table', `Irish Puddings, Tarts, Crumbles, and Fools', and `The Irish Heritage Cookbook' are of similar trade paperback format from Chronicle Books. They are also similar in that all seem to be collections of recipes from various culinary professionals in Ireland. They all also seem to repeat a lot of sidebar material, although I have yet to see any repeated recipes.

To state a perfectly obvious fact, you probably only want to buy this book if you happen to want to cook recipes prepared at Irish pubs. That is, if you already own a fairly sizable collection of cookbooks, many of the recipes in this book will simply be variations on recipes you already have in either a standard book on Irish cooking or in books on Brasserie or Trattoria cooking. This premise, however, is no little recommendation. My personal experience of pub food in England, to which most of these recipes bear a strong resemblance, is that English speaking pubs offer a quality of food at least as good as their much more widely advertised French Brasserie and Italian Trattoria cousins. Like the famous Italian and French `bar food' recipes, these also have the virtue of being very fast to prepare. Either they cook very quickly or they can be cooked up ahead and reheated very quickly. The best model for Americans of pub / brasserie / trattoria food would be the kind of thing you will find at Chili's, Bennigan's, or Appleby's, except that my experience with the three European versions is that they tend to deal in less greasy and less cliched dishes.
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By RincuBuS on July 7, 2008
Format: Paperback
I really enjoy this book. I am by no means a cook and as a single male living on my own I don't really cook "real food" a lot. However, I find the recipes in this book not only easy to follow but really good. The soups are awesome, even if they sound bad at first, the stews are great and the book also gives a little bit of information on pubs in Ireland. There are a ton of recipes from fish to poultry and from salads to soups. I was even able to make the soda bread for my parents. Plus there are a bunch of recipes for various soda breads. This book is a great buy and totally worth your time.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Theresa M. Daggett on January 8, 2009
Format: Paperback
My husband and I traveled to Ireland in 2002 and fell in love with the country. We ate at local pubs for almost every meal and decided that we needed to learn to replicate many of these meals. He bought me this book for Christmas several years ago and I have used many of the recipes over and over again.

We have a St. Patrick's party every year and have used this cookbook almost exclusively. We consistantly make the Blue-Cheese Stuffed Mushrooms, but have made a few changes with it. The Seafood Chowder is a crowd pleaser. I also love the Bacon, Blue-Cheese and Courgette (Zucchini) soup. The star of our cookbook, though, is the Black and White Guinness Mousse. I make this dessert 4 or 5 times a year. It is my most requested dessert and it is a wonderful presentation. My cookbook literally opens up to that page on its own.

Coming from a woman who has hundreds of cookbooks, this is one of my favorite. I am lucky enough to have Kerrigold butter sold in our local supermarket and I can also source true bangers, which makes a nice treat for our family. I would highly recommend this if you are looking for truly authentic Irish recipes. Slainte!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on July 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
Photos by the author blend with food photos by Leigh Beish in a lovely book which arrived too late for St. Patrick's Day feature, but which deserves ongoing mention as an excellent focus on Irish pub cooking. If you've been to Ireland in the last twenty years, you'll know there's been many changes in the nature of pub grub: just look at the tomato tarts, ham and chicken pie, spinach salad with pears and other dishes you wouldn't have identified with Irish pub foods of the past. Recipes - and photos - come from some of the most celebrated pubs in Ireland and represent a fine cross-section of modern fare home cooks will find quite easy to follow.

Diane C. Donovan

California Bookwatch
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By J.B. on January 16, 2013
Format: Paperback
My wife's mother was born and raised in Dublin so anything Irish is well received in our home. We love to cook everything from around the globe, and it was a treat to get this beautiful book as a gift for Christmas. Jamie Oliver has an amazing recipe for Steak & Guinness pie that we make frequently. It's a lovely dark stew that's then baked in a puff pastry crust. Delicious. We were excited to try one of the Irish stews from this book in hope that it would compare.

Tonight I cooked the Hargadon's Irish pub stew recipe from the book. I was a little concerned as it basically had no seasoning... just salt and pepper to taste. It was lamb, carrots, parsnips, potatoes, celery, onions and barley. That's it unless you count water as an ingredient. And the ingredient list only lists 3 onions, 5 potatoes, etc. Large, small, who knows? And two cups of barley. Dry, wet, other? No other direction.

The recipe started off calling for two pounds of lamb with enough water to cover, bringing to a boil and then adding two cups of barley and cooking for 30 minutes. Two cups of barley is enough to absorb 5 times that amount of water. So after 30 minutes I was instructed to add 5 potatoes, 3 onions, 2 parsnips, 4 large carrots and 4 stalks of celery. I had an unseasoned lamb and barley porridge with about 3 quarts of vegetables to mix in and cook for two hours. I had to add so much water to get it thin enough to even stir in the vegetables I ended up almost filling my 6 quart pot to the top. No amount of seasoning could save this dish. Bland and more bland with gelatinous bits of barley dominating every bite. If you ever try this recipe, skip the barley.

The funny thing is the picture on cover of the book is this recipe. No barley in sight.
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