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The Iron Heel Paperback – October 25, 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1619492288 ISBN-10: 1619492288 Edition: 0th

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: London Press (October 25, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1619492288
  • ISBN-13: 978-1619492288
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #91,179 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

<DIV>

Jack London (1876–1916) published an enormous number of stories and novels, including The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and Martin Eden.


Jonathan Auerbach is a professor of English at the University of Maryland at College Park.

</div>

Customer Reviews

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I would recommend this book to anyone interested in Economics.
parjda
Throughout the book, London's Nietzschian perspective on socialism was a constant theme.
Peter S. Bradley
I believe that the increasing Socialist vote will prevent - hope for it anyhow.
MR D MCMILLAN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Peter S. Bradley TOP 1000 REVIEWER on December 28, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a terrifically fun novel for (a) science fiction fans or (b) history buffs or (c) Jack London afficianados. The story is a novel written by London in 1908 that describes the failed putsch by socialists during the period running from approximately the 1910s through 1930s as a memoir recovered by a future Socialist utopia hundreds of years in the future. This last conceit allows London to describe the repressive government - the "Iron Heel" or "Oligarchy" - that inevitably follows the Marxist laws of history until the really succesful Socialist revolution occurs in the year 2180, aka Year One of the "Brotherhood of Man." The novel follows Ernest Everhard, and his wife Avery, who is the putative author of the memoir, so this novel also has what may be a unique perspective of London writing in the first person as a woman character, as they try to establish a socialist revolution in a world that is in the death grip of Capitalism.

From a historical perspective, this book is fascinating in that it seems to offer a glimpse into the worldview of the Left prior to World War One. The novel has more than its fair share of polemical moments when London preaches the Socialist gospel through the mouth of Everhard. We learn, for example, that capitalism is doomed to failure as it invests its surplus wealth into the development of foreign markets, which in turn become competitors, leading to a crisis where no further investment is possible. The rich get richer, the poor get poorer. The rich, who control the governments, pass legislation eliminating the independent middle class and reducing the poor to a state of serfdom. The rich create a special janissary-class of poor, who serve as the police and the army, to oppress their fellow class members.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By william mathews on October 23, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Iron Heel is a fictional history, a document of the future about the American socialist revolution against the Oligarchy and its counter-revolutionary forces, the Iron Heel. It seems to have been inspired by H.G. Wells and pieced together with American socialism of the West and its violent episodes, rather than the more urban East Coast tradition. I was raised partly in the Napa-Sonoma area as a teenager, so there was for me a sense of familiarity with the early setting of this tale in northern California.

But this tale of London's was in the end larger than fiction. In print by 1908, it was read by the young Bolshevik, Nicholai Bukharin, and woven into his analysis of imperialism and the expected transition to socialism during and after World War I and the Russian Revolution of October 1917. The Bolsheviks hardly needed inspiration from American socialism and they had their own experiences with Tsarist repression and civil war, but the concept of the Iron Heel stuck. And one thinks London's depiction of the proletariat as 'proles' may also have influenced George Orwell.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jason Barnhart on February 7, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having read other Jack London pieces I thought I might add this to my literacy list. Pleasantly surprised to find it more interesting and entertaining than expected as well as still relevant in many ways and offering worthwhile perspectives and insights into the politics of our own age. It isn't a terribly challenging book and worth reading on at least a few points. If you like Jack London in general you might give it a go. The book being set in a geographic area I know well also shed light on what must be some of the foundations of current political and social thought in the San Francisco Bay area.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Miguel Delgadillo on February 9, 2014
Format: Paperback
This book started off okay then ended in a cloud of adolescent bluster.
The description of mass executions, hundreds or thousands of people being killed or scores of people being executed is written in an impassive manner. The narrator is a woman who sometimes is cool in bearing witness to executions and at the end a helpless female running from danger in high heels ( in the manner of those 1950's monster movies where the men have to save her).
The need for violence is explained away in an offhanded manner that ignores adult sensitivity. On one hand we are told to sympathize with the working poor who slave away in the mills but then we are told that "hundreds were killed, executed after a fair trial." This reeks of adolescent bluster and betrays any serious discussion.

This book hammers away at the class struggle in a almost insane blissful manner. Somehow we are to accept the idea that small capitalists will not seek to expand their businesses until they too are giants who crowd out competitors, and that craftsmen won't do this either.
The premise that the Oligarchy can maintain their privileged status and keep out others from rising upward is false; indeed newcomers do join them just as lazy children of the the elites fall downward in the social castes. Isn't that the greatest plague of modern America? Too many middle class youth fail and fall.

Jack London omits the elephant in the room that we modern Americans (and Western Europeans too) must face; immigration legal or illegal. Where do immigrants stand in this historical struggle between capitalism and labor? I'll tell you, immigration lowers the costs of production both in skilled and unskilled trades. Labor needs must be nimble and illegal labor is ready to fill needs.
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