The Iron Woman (FF Childrens Classics) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Iron Woman Hardcover – Bargain Price, August 31, 1995


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Bargain Price, August 31, 1995
$25.33 $17.50
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 109 pages
  • Publisher: Dial Books, (August 31, 1995)
  • ISBN-10: 0803717962
  • ASIN: B0001PBYYK
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 5.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,264,349 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Employing thunderously expressive language and searing imagery, the poet laureate of England concocts a nightmarish morality tale about ecology. Unfortunately, the sonorous prose and Moser's haunting engravings fail to camouflage a simplistic plot and shaky premise. A vast Iron Woman arises out of a marsh and vows, to a schoolgirl named Lucy, to destroy those who have poisoned the waters. Afraid for her father and the others who work at the toxin-dumping Waste Factory, Lucy contacts Hogarth, the boyish handler of the Iron Man (a figure introduced more than 20 years ago in Hughes's The Iron Giant). The children's warnings do not stop the polluters, and so the Iron Woman, after being energized by Iron Man's Space-Bat-Angel-Dragon from outer space, turns every adult male in the country into some type of water creature. They resume human form only after a monstrous Cloud-Spider gets sucked off into space, which also causes the country's refuse to transform, miraculously, into a nonpolluting fuel/fertilizer/pesticide ("'Our problems,' said the prime minister, 'seem to be strangely solved'"). Hardly a timely or instructive parable for readers who, despite their youth, know that there are no magical solutions to a pressing global concern. Ages 10-up.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-7?A strange cry and quaking earth alert Lucy (age 10?) to a Presence in the marsh. Next day at dawn, snowdrops and foxgloves at her bedroom window signal the arrival of a huge woman of iron. Benevolent toward Lucy, she rages implacably against the factory where Lucy's father works: it is polluting the waters and their wildlife, as Lucy learns in an apocalyptic vision, accompanied by the terrifying screams of the tortured creatures (including a human baby). Lucy enlists Hogarth, who enlists the Iron Man (both from The Iron Giant [HarperCollins, 1988]). Lucy and Hogarth confront the factory manager, but in the end it is the magic of the Space-Bat-Angel-Dragon that saves the Iron Woman from having to "DESTROY THE POISONERS." All-too-obviously politically correct on the surface, this novel is riddled with problems. The centrality of the female figures is a mere nod to feminism: Hogarth has all the ideas, and the Iron Man has all the power. The wicked factory is, confusingly, in the business of recycling. The predictable triumph of right is achieved by a blatant deus ex machina, and pollution is banished by entirely magical means (with some mumbling about "change within" the human agents). Even the critique of greed is undercut when Hughes assures readers that the post-miracle factory makes greater profits than before. The language has occasional brilliance, but for the most part it is as feeble as the plot. The integrity of Tales of the Early World (Farrar, 1991) is nowhere to be found. Hughes's name, and Moser's powerful illustrations, are likely to attract browsers; but keeping readers is another story.?Patricia (Dooley) Lothrop Green, St. George's School, Newport,
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michael Haig on April 25, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Iron Woman tells the story of a female iron giant, a companion of the male iron giant of the earlier The Iron Man. The Iron Woman represents the spirit of nature fighting the human forces of industrialization which are destroying the environment. Hughes, in his letters, noted the ubiquitousness of children's concerns for the environment, and here he is clearly concerned to entertain and instruct accordingly. While The Iron Woman is enjoyable and instructive, even for adults, it lacks the cogency of The Iron Man, and it is possible that Hughes had difficulty imagining a female monster rather than a male monster (monsters in literature being conventionally male, like Frankenstein's monster).

The Iron Woman appears to a small girl Lucy, who, like Hogarth in The Iron Man (Hogarth is also a character in this story), becomes sympathetically involved in the action relating to the Iron Woman. Lucy is reminiscent of Alice of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass: however Hughes's story does not contain the gratuitous bad-temperedness which seems to be the whole of Alice's fabulous experience.

Hughes's writing in The Iron Woman contains many metaphors, to excite children's imaginations. It also contains much good humour and many strokes of genius. He writes cleanly of mod cons - for example, binoculars - with little sense of any Eliotic 'malaise' in the face of technological advance.

Hughes's writing does contain some irony. This is particularly evident in his description of the Space-Bat-Angel-Dragon. It is symptomatic of Hughes's dislike of or indifference to religion. Parents should be aware of this aspect of Hughes's work before passing it on to children.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Paul Camp on February 4, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Ted Hughes (1930- 1978) was poet laureate of England. Barry Moser is an American artist who grew up in Chattanooga and who has illustrated every book from the Bible to the Alice books to _The Wizard of Oz_ (where the Wicked Witch of the West was modeled on Nancy Reagan) to poetry books by Donald Hall. The main problem that I have with Moser's engravings is that there are never quite enough of them.

On page 57 of _The Iron Woman_ (1993), we see Moser's portrait of the smug, self-satisfied factory manager, J. Wells. On page 87, we see a portrait of what has become of him. We are told:

Mr. Wells the giant catfish was now in the swimming pool in his new home. His two little sons spent their time digging worms and dropping them in to see him sucking them off the blue tiles with his great blunt mouth. (86)

There are some other characters who receive some wickedly funny just desserts as well. And yet, we come to realize, that "the whole thing had gotten out of hand" (88). And who is responsible for things getting out of hand? We can see her on Moser's cover to the book-- a female robot who rises out of an English marsh and disrupts the balance of nature:

The black shape was the size of two or three elephants. It looked like a hippopotamus-headed, gigantic dinosaur, dragging itself on all fours up out of a prehistoric tar pit. But now, still like a dinosaur, it sat upright. And all at once it looked human-- immense, but human. Great hands clawed at the head, flinging away swatches of muddy reeds. Then amid gurglings and suckings and with a groaning wail, the thing stood erect. A truly colossal man-shaped statue of black mud, raking itself and groaning, towered over the lonely marsh.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joshua Jaramillo on February 8, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
i haven't read it yet but the package was nice and the book was shiny new what i wanted thanks a million.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 5, 1999
Format: Library Binding
I REALLY LIKE YOUR BOOK AND I WOULD LIKE TO HAVE A REPLY TO SAY THANKYOU OR SOME INFORMATOIN
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?