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The Irrational Atheist: Dissecting the Unholy Trinity of Dawkins, Harris, And Hitchens Hardcover – March 11, 2008


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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Day does us all a service by exposing as false some of the glib slogans of atheism."  —Todd Seavey, American Council on Science and Health



"Good polemical stuff."  —nationalreview.com


"Whether you embrace Day’s theology or toss it, there is no avoiding the cumulative force of the author's counter assaults or the sting of his wit when it comes to the true focus of the book—atheism’s continuing love affair with nonsense."  —First Things

About the Author

Vox Day is a writer, columnist, software designer and the author of Rebel Moon,
The World in Shadow, and The War in Heaven: Eternal Warriors Book 1. He is the CEO of a technology corporation, writes a popular weekly political column, and maintains an active blog, Vox Popoli, which has 2,500 daily readers.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 305 pages
  • Publisher: BenBella Books (March 11, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1933771364
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933771366
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (111 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #885,501 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Three-time Hugo Award nominee Vox Day writes epic fantasy as well as non-fiction about religion, philosophy, and economics. His literary focus is military realism, historical verisimilitude, and plausible characters who represent the full spectrum of human behavior. He is a professional game designer who speaks three languages and a three-time Billboard top 40 recording artist.

He maintains a pair of popular blogs, Vox Popoli and Alpha Game, which between them average over 1.5 million pageviews per month. He has been ranked as a top 100 SF author by Amazon, and is proud to bear the historic distinction of being the first and only member to have the SFWA Board vote to purge him from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. He is a Native American and his books have been translated into ten languages.

He is also, with Tom Kratman, the co-creator of the military science fiction anthology series, RIDING THE RED HORSE.

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

139 of 171 people found the following review helpful By M. D. Colebourne on May 1, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Despite approaching this from the perspective of a (weak) atheist who has admired Dawkins greatly over the years I enjoyed this book. Anyone who doesn't want to slip into the comfy zone of only ever debating and discussing with people who concur might disagree but, personally, I think that knowing your opponent is preferable. And, when your opponent manages to strike some good blows AND entertain you into the bargain it has to be a good outcome.

Vox Day has, in general, steered clear of cant and, instead, directly addressed the facts and assertions employed by Harris, Dawkins and Dennett and it is here that, for me at least, the book had the most value. Vox has done his research and lucidly sets out his facts. I think that there are clearly flaws in some of the argumentation, as has been pointed out in other reviews, with a-priori assumption of that to be proved being the most common complaint. However, it's entertaining if you like the mental exercise.

Having said that, I would love to have a book from Vox that addresses the fundamentals; my view is that the impact of a fact, for good or ill, has no bearing whatsoever on its veracity. One can argue that atheism or theism leads to better or worse outcomes but it is fundamentally irrelevant to the argument. Ultimately, there is or there is not a God - period.

Therefore it is entirely pointless for either side to argue for or against the existence of God on the basis of whether that means people behave better, do or do not persecute other races or any other consequence; benign or malign. The consequences are our problem.

In fact, I would love to have books from both sides that directly address the fundamentals rather than long treatises on who behaves better, produces better laws etc etc.
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407 of 599 people found the following review helpful By Brian E on February 4, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I only managed to read the first 3 chapters of this book. Vox Day employs so many logical fallacies and so much dishonest rhetoric that it's a difficult read.

The author employs ad-hominems against all atheists (atheists are parasites), but reserves especial vitriol against Dawkins (an old grump with asperger's), Hitchens (a drunk), and Harris (an extasy-popper who hasn't finished his Ph.D). This is a good example of going the man, not the argument. By painting all atheists, wrongly, as bad, he hopes he doesn't have to present any argumentation against the atheist position (that there are no gods).

Day also misrepsents the positions the popular atheist authors. He creates straw-men arguments that he can knock down. According to Vox, Dawkins says Vox telling his children that God loves them is worse than child abuse. This a lie. Dawkins has said no such thing as a reading of the God delusion will attest. Vox pretends that Sam Harris would think it ethical to kill him. This is also a lie. That is not Harris' position either. Vox goes on in this vein for quite a while that it's obvious that his claims to truth and fact have been long abandoned.

He attacks science for the way people have used scientific discoveries and attacks scientists for having made these discoveries. This, of course, is the genetic fallacy. The fallacy here, that by attacking the origin of argument, he can avoid making a case to support his point of view.

Vox attacks the enlightenment and science as bringers of violence and intolerance. But he misrepresents both. The Enlightenment wasn't French peasants out to get revenge on the French aristocracy nor Nazis using ancient Christian bigotry to exterminate Jews and science doesn't lead to good or bad acts.
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51 of 76 people found the following review helpful By William Alexander on August 2, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I was looking for a book that would be a kind of "counterpoint" to the favorable review I gave Christopher Hitchens' book some time back, and read this loaner on a friend's recommendation. I am very, very glad I paid no money for this, its grandiose "B Horror Movie" title to one side. I mean, "Unholy Trinity?" But I digress.

I read all of the reviews in this thread as well, hoping that someone might have made a point I missed somewhere, allowing me to be a little more charitable. I am afraid I did not find much to use. I will say that the book is written in a baroque linguistic style many find off-putting but which I rather liked. Day has a powerful vocabulary he uses well, although the prose slides too often into what could be fairly interpreted as self-referential pomposity. But, that too, I think, is not damning. Religion and belief in Western culture have been increasingly framed as private and not communual exercises, so defending this position from a personal perspective is, perhaps, something to be expected and even indulged even if it really advances no argument, pro or con. What I did not like was how the book fails to live up to its title. I found no "dissection" here. For every good point he makes, and there are many, instead of measured follow up, it seems like there is an "a priori" argument or "ad hominem" attack which do nothing but make the author sound petulant and even viciously mean-spirited. This is not even to mention that I have no way of knowing if his tossed-of personal slurs against the people he seeks to engage are even true, and even if so, whether or not they would even matter. From someone writing from a position as a "Christian libertarian," this seems contradictory, even schizophrenic.
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