The Irreducible Needs Of Children and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: This book has already been well loved by someone else and that love shows. It MIGHT have highlighting, underlining, be missing a dust jacket, or SLIGHT water damage, but over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Irreducible Needs of Children: What Every Child Must Have to Grow, Learn, and Flourish Hardcover – September 1, 2000


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$2.13 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$96.50

Frequently Bought Together

The Irreducible Needs of Children: What Every Child Must Have to Grow, Learn, and Flourish + Big Black Penis: Misadventures in Race and Masculinity + Child, Family, School, Community: Socialization and Support
Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Perseus Publishing; 1st edition (September 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0738203254
  • ISBN-13: 978-0738203256
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 5.8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,335,148 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Parents can sometimes feel like ships being tossed in the storm--trying to keep their households afloat amidst escalating child-care and health-care costs, declining funding for public schools, and workplaces that do not favor working families. The Irreducible Needs of Children reads like a social compass, or better yet, a family's true north. T. Berry Brazelton, one of the world's most respected pediatricians, joins with one of the most respected child psychiatrists, Stanley Greenspan, to offer parents, as well as caregivers, teachers, policymakers, and even custody-hearing judges clear-cut guidelines for rearing healthy, well-nurtured children.

Each chapter speaks to the fundamental priorities, such as "The Need for Ongoing, Nurturing Relationships" or "The Need for Limit Setting, Structure, and Expectations." In every chapter the two doctors offer a lively dialog as they boldly assert their child-rearing opinions based on solid research and their collective years of wisdom. They then lead into a list of joint recommendations. No topic is too controversial or specific for these hard-core child advocates, including how many hours a baby or toddler should be in child care per week (ideally less than 30), the importance of one-on-one time, setting up child-oriented custody arrangements, and how much homework or television a child should have each day. Although you may not agree with every recommendation, this makes an excellent navigational tool for parents and anyone else who controls the course of children's destinies. --Gail Hudson

From Publishers Weekly

Pediatrician Brazelton (Touchpoints) and child psychiatrist Greenspan (Building Healthy Minds) join together to present a hard-hitting treatise on what children really need from their parents and from society. While the text is densely written, it is engaging. The two childcare experts share the mutually strong conviction that society is not currently meeting the basic needs of children. Each chapter is devoted to the discussion of an "irreducible" need, such as the Need for Ongoing Nurturing Relationships, the Need for Physical Protection, Safety and Regulation, the Need for Stable Supportive Communities and Cultural Continuity, and the Need to Protect the Future. After each discussion, the authors recommend ways to meet these needs. For instance, Brazelton and Greenspan examine how day care shortchanges children in America and make detailed recommendations on what is needed to improve the situation, such as better training, higher wages and continuity of care. Also powerful are their comments on educational issues and the need for an expanded role by schools and healthcare systems. Policy makers, health-care professionals, educators and parents will find this a thought-provoking but demanding read that poses incisive questions about the way we raise, educate and care for our children. Brazelton and Greenspan offer viable, intelligent solutions to a full deck of problems faced by our country as well as by the global community. (Oct.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

61 of 63 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 8, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I read this book expecting to obtain help and information on disciplining and understanding my 2 year old. Instead, the book outlined cleary and forcefully policy points for addressing the various problems facing todays world youth.
While this book (i) makes for interesting "cocktail party" conversation for the casual observer and (ii) provides valid and interesting action plans for those in the legislative, judicial or social work arenas addressing various problems facing children(e.g., custody dispute resolution norms), this book is not a how-to book for parents (like some of Brazelton's other books).
This book should not be bought by those seeking a how-to parenting book. Other more informative books on this subject should be consulted instead. On the other hand, this book should be bought by those engaged in any aspect of work with children.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
43 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Laurie P. Badley on October 22, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Gail Hudson's review above words things a little oddly. True, you could argue that this book says children ideally should be in day care less than 30 hours a week, but what it actually says it that ideally, an infant should be at home with a full=time parent! Less than ideal is excellent day care, and it should not happen more than 30 hours a week.
These and other specifics are in this book - how many floor sessions to have with a toddler, how much holding time an infant needs, how many hours of one on one an elementary schooler needs.
This book is marvelous. All parents will find they've fallen short of the ideal, but here's some directions to follow in geting back on track.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Debra K. New on December 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a Ph.D. candidate, I read many child development books and this is one that I can get very excited about. Granted, many parents will find the advice hard to swallow, but this is a research based book. In the perfect world, this is how we would raise our children. I think this book is geared more for activists and professionals, but I also believe all parents should be an activist for their child. I wish every senator and congressman were required to read this book. Frankly, I'm grateful to Drs. Brazelton and Greenspan for giving us this opportunity for a glimse into their brillent minds. I would rate this as a must read for anyone concerned about our nation's children and social policies.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Nature Mom w/ 2 children + EE & Management degrees on April 3, 2001
Format: Hardcover
It's hard to believe Dr. Brazelton, who has written so many other brilliant parenting books, was an author of this book! It's not that the content was bad or controversially new - but as I read it I kept thinking "Been there, heard that. Where is the infamous Brazelton wisdom and humor usually found in his books?" This book reads like a thesis and is nothing like his other parenting books. This book was such a disappointment for a Dr. Brazelton fan.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
42 of 52 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I am a fan of Brazleton, and I eagerly awaited this book. (I even pre-ordered it before publication.) I was disappointed, however, when I read it, even though I agree with most, if not all, of what Brazleton says.
Much of it is obvious and basic information, at least to most parents I know. (I would think that most people interested enough in child care to order the book don't actually need it. Those who do need it are not likely to read it or agree with its philosophies.)
Some of the book is tedious and boring, getting into developmental studies and theories that set out graphs and charts that are meaningless to parents.
Very little of the book was informative and interesting. (The only thing interesting that I even remember is a section about two visits to daycare centers and how the average daycare worker spends time with infants and children, compared to the ideal parent or childcare provider. It is horrifying.)
I also found the writing style to be offputing, especially where the two authors repeatedly say "One of us (T.B.)found that ..."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 26, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Chapter 1 The Need for Ongoing Nurturing Relationships
Chapter 2 The Need for Physical Protection, Safety, and Regulation,
Chapter 3 The Need for Experiences Tailored to Individual Differences
Chapter 4 The Need for Developmentally Appropriate Experiences
Chapter 5 The Need for Limit Setting, Structure, and Expectations
Chapter 6 The Need for Stable, Supportive Communities and Cultural Continunity
Chapter 7 Protecting the Future
This book was somewhat infomative and worthwhile to read because it gave suggestions and ideas on how we can make this world a better place for children. However, in the last chapter, I felt it was poorly written because the authors just stated the problems of our global enviornment and gave little advice or ideas on how we can protect out children's future. I also felt that the authors discussed too much on some of the issues mentioned in the book. While I found this book useful for a research paper, I didn't feel the authors did a excellent job of explaning the needs of children and how we can make it a better place for them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 2, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Yes, of course, dual income families are a necessity (for most people) given today's economic reality. Still, what kind of relationships can parents have with their kids when they're both working 60 hour weeks? Let's be honest. Something has to give. Greenspan and Brazelton have a plan to evolve our societal model so we can live more humane and rewarding family lives. They call for a balance of child care and work demands, but not based on the '50s model where the wife stayed home. READ THIS BOOK. This book gives people clear and specific guidelines for what it takes to build essential relationships with children that will instill in them with the confidence, sense of security, and love they so desperately need. Now we all need to READ THIS BOOK. If only this book accompanied the free bag of baby formula new parents get when they leave the hospital!!! It is a must read for legislators, educators, parents and grandparents. And it is the perfect baby shower gift or companion to a baby medical guide. Please READ THIS BOOK.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?