Qty:1
  • List Price: $6.95
  • Save: $0.69 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for *FREE* Super Saver Shipping! Excellent customer service, qualifies for Amazon A to Z satisfaction. All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the library of" labels.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Island on Bird Street Paperback – January 20, 1992


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$6.26
$2.00 $0.01

100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


Frequently Bought Together

The Island on Bird Street + Island of the Blue Dolphins
Price for both: $10.20

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Top 20 Books for Kids
See the books our editors' chose as the Best Children's Books of 2014 So Far or see the lists by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12 | Nonfiction

Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 4 - 6
  • Lexile Measure: 690L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers; Reissue edition (January 20, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395616239
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395616239
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #332,038 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"More than just a valuable addition to Holocaust literature . . . it should garner a wide audience, which is exactly what its spirited portrait of hope and dauntless courage deserves." Booklist, ALA

Language Notes

Text: English, Hebrew (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Uri Orlev was born in Warsaw in 1931. In 1996, Uri Orlev received the the highest international recognition given to an author of children's books. He now lives in Jerusalem.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
23
4 star
13
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 38 customer reviews
It was fun to read and easy to enjoy.
Horis
At times it could be a bit dull, but over all this book was wonderful.
Lauren B.
I saw the movie and then wanted to tread the book.
Paul Kamann

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By pegalou on July 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
I saw the movie "The Island on Bird Street" with my son and husband recently. It was such a touching film that we saw it again. I cried and will never forget the film. It should get an Academy award. After we saw the film, I ordered the book from Amazon because I wanted to know more about what happened to Alex. The first part of the book moves a little slow, but it needs to to describe all the characters and what is happening. The last half of the book is so moving I couldn't put the book down. I think it would be a great book for all kids to read in school when they are studying about WWII. But even without the historical backdrop, it is a powerful book showing how a young boy can overcome such awful odds and still survive. Alex struggles to survive by finding food in the ghetto with his pet mouse, Snow, and by making a hidden home in the ghetto. His lonliness is overcome by reading and meeting a few friends a long the way. He waits for months for his father to return not knowing if his father is alive or not. His faith that his father will come back for him sustains him. I think the book gives hope that we can overcome great adversity with faith and resourcefulness. I would definitely recommend the book and movie.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lauren B. on April 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is an interesting book that really brings you into the mind of a Jewish child living during the Holocaust. It tells the story of an 11 year old boy named Alex who lives with his father in the Warsaw Ghetto.
One horrible day, Alex's father leaves and Alex is forced to live in a bombed out house on 78 Bird Street. There he must learn how to survive in the always threatening conditions. Until his father returns, Alex must always be on alert. The main character's bravery and courage is inspiring to all who read this book. At times it could be a bit dull, but over all this book was wonderful. Anyone who loves to sit down with a good book should read The Island on Bird Street.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
I happened upon this book in our school library. It is an easy and incredible read. Growing up we have heard of the horrors but this book puts a real human spin on it all. The young boy learns independance and resourcefullness in an amazing short amount of time. Though there is tragedy it has a happy ending. Its kind of a sad, feel good story for just about 10years old and up.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By K. Corn TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
Highly recommended and little-known book of the war and Holocaust years told from a child's perspective. Left alone in the ghetto, a young boy struggles to survive, showing enormous courage, resilience and willpower. I also recommend the video if and when you can get a copy (some video stores have previewed copies on sale or Amazon's zhops and auctions occasionally have some) as it is an incredibly well-acted and moving story. The book and video do have some differences but would make a nice adition to any collection of Jewish literature and/or movies. I'd recommend the book for a teenage reader or for a Jewish reading group. Best for more mature readers able to handle difficult, complex topics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on December 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
I think the Island on Bird Street was a good book. It tied in with the Holocaust, and World War Two. The book was about a boy named Alex whose mother and father were both taken by the Germans, Alex's father told him to hide out and wait for him in a bombed out house even if it took years Alex was to wait for him. Alex was to originally wait in a bunker under the house, but one night he heard a noise, so he moved to the top floor using a rope ladder that he cleverly made himself. The next day a truck pulled up in front of the house and police officers went into his bunker to look around. They made a hole in the ground and there was a real bunker under his. The police hauled out all of the people. Alex thought he was lucky for moving out. I think the book was very interesting. I couldn't guess what was going to come next in the book. It was a thriller. You felt like you were there with Alex. When someone was close to finding him, your heart would start pounding. I suggest the book to anyone who likes to read about adventures.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 4, 2002
Format: Paperback
Alex awoke to find his dad sitting on the floor facing the front door with a gun in his hands. Alex knew his dad was going threw some tough times because Alex's mom went to a different ghetto to visit some friends and hasn't came back for a whole week. Alex went over to his dad to tell his dad to go to sleep but once he saw the pistol he asked his dad if he is going to shoot the Germans and his dad replied "if I must I will."
I really liked this book. It was very interesting because it explained how Jewish people were treated during the Holocaust and how they had to hide and risk the things they loved. It had parts that were sad and other parts that made you feel glad. It also showed what the Germans did to the Jewish people, like making them sleep in bunks together with three or more people, and treated them with disrespect by breaking into people's houses and taking them away.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on September 29, 2004
Format: Paperback
It is the dearest wish of my heart that maybe, someday, I will be lucky enough to someday become a real honest-to-goodness children's book reviewer. To succeed in this goal, however, I feel that I must give myself a thorough background in children's books. As a result, I've found myself reviewing many books that, while considered "classics" are stories I would not be reading today if it weren't for their cultural cache. I'm saying all of this because I want you to understand fully why I did not want to read "The Island On Bird Street" at the outset. I'm the gal who as a child refused to read books that even traipsed lightly upon any and all serious subjects. No realistic situations for me, thank you very much. So it shouldn't surprise you the amount of resistance I felt towards reading Uri Orlev's classic Holocaust drama. But I'm 26 years old and if a 26 year old can't read a serious children's book, they probably have something seriously wrong with them. With that cheery thought in mind, I bit the bullet and plunged in. I was expecting a depressing treatise on the horrors of war and the depravity of Nazi Germany. And that's part of the book, no question. But what I didn't expect, and found (much to my delight) was a story that also read like a WWII Robinson Crusoe. It comes as a great relief.

As our Jewish hero, Alex and his family begin this tale as members of a Polish ghetto in an unnamed town during WWII. Actually, it's just Alex and his father at this point. His mother disappeared not long ago and is suspected to have been taken away by the occupying German forces. When it becomes clear to Alex's father that his son will probably need to survive on his own someday (a day that comes sooner than either of them think) he teaches the boy how to keep and shoot a gun.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?