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The Jacket (The Star Rover) Paperback – March 7, 2013


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Editorial Reviews

Review

'Jack London revolutionised American fiction' The Independent --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone. He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf. London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (March 7, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1482718197
  • ISBN-13: 978-1482718195
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.4 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,444,197 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A. Corcoran on January 18, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book, it was a lot of different genres of short stories all mixed together really eloquently. This is an older book, so the language is a little different. I was glad i had a kindle because i had to use the built in dictionary a few times, which doesn't happen often. While everyone may not enjoy this, I'm sure many will. I don't personally believe in reincarnation, but it was still a really interesting book. And it's free. Here is a short summary of the plot.

The book is about a professor that is in prison for murder in the early 1900s. He ends up in solitary confinement and after making some friends is taught to relive past lives. He uses this to escape the torture he is put through by the warden and in this book is supposedly writing his memoirs. He does get tortured quite a bit, if you don't want to read about torture, this book may not be for you.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By card girl on April 8, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition
I read this book a few years ago, so I'm writing this review based on my memory of the book. The story kept you involved with the characters. I must tell you the story was disturbing to me, but I had to finish it because I was so drawn into the story. The Star Rover is about a man in prison whom the guards place in solitary confinement, and a strait jacket. It was disturbing to me because of the pain the guards inflicted upon the inmates. His fellow inmates inform him of the process of roving to stay alive while in the jacket.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Karl Janssen on May 17, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Darrell Standing is an inmate in San Quentin Prison. A former professor of agronomics at the University of California, he was convicted of a murder he admittedly did commit. Once incarcerated, he is wrongly accused of a conspiracy to escape, and unjustly sentenced to solitary confinement. He spends five long years in solitary, during which he endures frequent beatings and long periods bound in a straitjacket. The near suffocating constriction of the jacket has an unexpected side effect. Over time, Standing develops the ability to separate his consciousness from his imprisoned body, enabling him to travel through time and space to experience past lives. Among the many personalities he inhabits while in the jacket are Count Guillaume de Saint-Maure, a swordsman of medieval France; Jesse Fancher, a nine-year-old member of a wagon train crossing Utah in 1857; a nameless 4th-century hermit in Egypt; Adam Strang, a 16th century Englishman, supposedly the first white man to set foot in Korea; Ragnar Lodbrog, a Norse-born Roman centurion in the service of Pontius Pilate; Daniel Foss, a seal hunter shipwrecked on an Antarctic isle in the early 19th century; and a series of prehistoric tribesmen representative of various ages of mankind's distant past. In his death row cell, Standing compiles a manuscript detailing the biographies of these past lives, as well as the harsh conditions he endures at San Quentin.

The Star Rover, also known as The Jacket, was published in 1915. Though considered a novel, the book really reads more like a collection of short stories loosely tied together by the prison narrative.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Bojan Tunguz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 30, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Prison life has never been easy, and prisoners have always had to endure physical and mental hardship that goes well beyond the suffering of the loss of freedom. Prisoners have oftentimes had to suffer physical abuse and corporal punishment at the hands of prison authorities. "The Jacket" is Jack London's novel that explores one particularly cruel form of physical punishment - straitjacketing of prisoners into a full-body "jacket" that severely restricts the flow of blood to most parts of their bodies, and in extreme cases induces angina.

The main protagonist of "The Jacket" is Darrell Standing, a former university professor who is serving a life imprisonment for a murder. Due to some low-level intrigue amongst prisoners, he is suspected of hiding dynamite and sent to solitary confinement. There he is put into the jacket, and at first he experiences excruciating pain. However, one other prisoner introduces him to a "trick" that would make his condition in the jacket tolerable. He is introduced to a technique of entering a trance-like state where your conscience is freed from the constraints of your body and is free to roam the universe. Once Standing accomplishes this state of mind, he starts to recall episodes from what he believes are his previous lives. These various episodes form the bulk of the narrative in the book, and each one of them can be read as a separate short story. The stories are very interesting in their own right. This is a very good thing, because otherwise the constant repeated recollection of previous lives could make the plot development tedious.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Bojan Tunguz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 30, 2011
Format: Paperback
Prison life has never been easy, and prisoners have always had to endure physical and mental hardship that goes well beyond the suffering of the loss of freedom. Prisoners have oftentimes had to suffer physical abuse and corporal punishment at the hands of prison authorities. "The Jacket" is Jack London's novel that explores one particularly cruel form of physical punishment - straitjacketing of prisoners into a full-body "jacket" that severely restricts the flow of blood to most parts of their bodies, and in extreme cases induces angina.

The main protagonist of "The Jacket" is Darrell Standing, a former university professor who is serving a life imprisonment for a murder. Due to some low-level intrigue amongst prisoners, he is suspected of hiding dynamite and sent to solitary confinement. There he is put into the jacket, and at first he experiences excruciating pain. However, one other prisoner introduces him to a "trick" that would make his condition in the jacket tolerable. He is introduced to a technique of entering a trance-like state where your conscience is freed from the constraints of your body and is free to roam the universe. Once Standing accomplishes this state of mind, he starts to recall episodes from what he believes are his previous lives. These various episodes form the bulk of the narrative in the book, and each one of them can be read as a separate short story. The stories are very interesting in their own right. This is a very good thing, because otherwise the constant repeated recollection of previous lives could make the plot development tedious.
Read more ›
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