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The Jade Rubies Paperback – February 9, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 251 pages
  • Publisher: Inkling Press; 1st edition (February 9, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1604023007
  • ISBN-13: 978-1604023008
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 4.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,717,331 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

It s all too common for a reader to find themselves snuggled cozily in their home, under blankets within the safety of their predictable world. It is in such cases that the juxtaposition of a novel such as Valerie Lee's The Jade Rubies truly shakes the reader. As I watched a tale of two innocent Chinese girls unfold, I became self-aware; knowing that I would never have to endure the trauma that these girls lived for 251 pages was both a relieving and guilt laden experience. This isn't the first time that I've experienced this particular set of emotions, as I'm often drawn to stories concerning the multicultural plight of women.
Valerie Lee shows us by way of sights and the imagery of scents that a deep mystery is set to unfold by the end of the book. I found myself deeply invested in the kindly characters and equally critical of the villains. I think she found her voice as a writer and used it well. --Jennifer Harbourn

About the Author

Valerie was born in Vancouver. She has worked for several newspapers writing cultural awareness pieces for the Chinese community.

More About the Author

Valerie Lee was born and educated in Vancouver, B.C. After her marriage, she moved to the United States where she has lived most of her life. Her great-grandfather, Reverend Chan Yu Tan, was ordained as a Minister of the Methodist Church in Canada in 1923. She remembers with fondness learning how to recite her prayers in Cantonese when he officiated at the Chinese United Church in the 1940s.

Valerie has worked as a reporter for several newspapers, covering various topics, with a strong emphasis on writing cultural awareness pieces for the Chinese community. Her articles have appeared in the Vancouver Sun (Voices), Vancouver Chinatown News, Asian Week, Asian Pages, Face magazine, and True Story magazine. The subject of much of her writing is life in Vancouver Chinatown.

She is currently working on a book about gambling.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Eléna Martina on May 9, 2013
Format: Paperback
The book's plot was intriguing. The sale of two little Asian sisters by their parents to a wealthy merchant and his wife who emotionally, physically, and sexually abuses them for many years until they both escape.
It takes place in Vancouver, Canada where the Chinese began to migrate due to fear of what was then happening in China. The story took me inside the clash between the poor and rich Chinese, their ship voyage to a strange place in the early 1900's, and how they viewed White people.

There were a lot of Chinese words included in the text, and many Chinese characters named in the story (it was a bit hard to follow 'who' was 'who' at times). Overall, the story is good, and I would recommend it to readers who are interested in Chinese immigration to the Western world as exposed by its author, Valerie Lee, of Chinese descent.
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Format: Paperback
I recently read The Jade Rubies about two young sisters sold into slavery in China. While the story is set in 1915, human trafficking is still a multi-billion dollar problem today with millions of victims worldwide. Through the Jade Rubies, Valerie Lee accurately captures the isolation and terror associated with human trafficking and catapults us into that scary world. If you get a chance, I suggest you read it.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Valerie Lee's historical novel The Jade Rubies touches my heart for sisterhood, womanhood. Self-worth more precious than mountain of gold when Chinese sisters endure human bondage in Western world and plot escape. Lee writes about child abuse and human trafficking with fearless compassion.
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Format: Paperback
In The Jade Rubies, two young Chinese sisters are sold to a child broker and sent to Canada, where they fall into a routine of abuse--modern day slaves. This book shows their courage and how they survive in a new land where they don't know the language and have no money. The reader gets an inside look at Chinese culture as it was in 1915. The author grew up in a Chinese community in Vancouver, BC, Canada.
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Format: Paperback
This book gives the reader a peek into the world of human trafficking in the late 1800s, early 1900s. Two little girls, taken from their homes in China, treasure the only thing they have from home, the jade rubies that their mother gave them before they were sold. It's a sad story but historically accurate. The author tells the story, which has a ring of truth, based on what she learned growing up in a Chinese community in Vancouver, B.C. Canada.
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