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The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You've Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson Hardcover – April 10, 2012


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The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You've Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson + Separation of Church & State: What the Founders Meant + The Second Amendment
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson; Book Club (BCE/BOMC) edition (April 10, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595554599
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595554598
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.2 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (507 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #28,410 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David Barton is the founder and president of WallBuilders, a national pro-family organization that presents America s forgotten history and heroes, with an emphasis on our moral, religious, and constitutional heritage. He is the author of many best-selling books, including Original Intent, The Bulletproof George Washington, American History in Black and White, and The Question of Freemasonry and the Founding Fathers. He addresses more than 400 groups each year. Barton was named by Time magazine as one of America s 25 most influential evangelicals, and he has received numerous national and international awards, including Who s Who in Education and Daughters of the American Revolution s highest award, the Medal of Honor. David and his wife, Cheryl, have three grown children.

More About the Author

David Barton is the founder of WallBuilders, an organization dedicated to presenting America's forgotten history and heroes, with an emphasis on our moral, religious, and constitutional heritage. David is author of numerous best-selling works and a national award-winning historian who brings a fresh perspective to history.

Customer Reviews

Barton has gone to the original source (Jefferson himself) for this book.
S. Leonardson
Nonetheless, her book wasn't pulled for errors as university publishers will do faster than mainstream publishers like Thomas Nelson.
Texas Historian
Even worse is the notion of him believing his own lies, but I just don't think he's that stupid.
Stephen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

60 of 88 people found the following review helpful By Ryan on August 25, 2014
Format: Hardcover
"David Barton has perfected the tricky art of being a renowned, best-selling historical author while having absolutely no credentials in history whatsoever. Through his organization WallBuilders, Barton established a goal of "historical reclamation," insisting that his research into American history has built a strikingly different timeline from the one we were all taught in schools (which, incidentally, is the correct one).

Actual historians will tell you that Barton distorts quotes, cherry-picks information, cites fraudulent sources, and straight-up fictionalizes history to serve his political goals. This was never more evident than when he managed to publish his book The Jefferson Lies, which portrayed Thomas Jefferson as a Christian fighting for the rights of slaves, and which was immediately voted "the least credible history book in print" by historians, professors, and Christian scholars (the publisher quickly yanked it off the shelves in response).

So not only does Barton have the support of precisely zero historians, but the [falsehood] of some of his claims is obvious to anyone with a lick of common sense and possibly a calculator. He claims that the American Revolutionary War was fought to end slavery, despite the easily verifiable facts that the majority of the Founding Fathers owned slaves, Britain abolished slavery decades before the United States did, and the United States took another century to add the abolishment of slavery to the Constitution. Barton also claims that the Founding Fathers settled the creationism debate long ago, despite the crippling handicap of not being scientists and having all died before Darwin published his theory of evolution.
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950 of 1,492 people found the following review helpful By James Ferguson VINE VOICE on April 3, 2012
Format: Hardcover
To look at David Barton, you would think he is a reasonable fellow, but then he opens his mouth and you wonder where on earth his ideas come from. His notion that the Jefferson Bible was some attempt to simplify the Bible for the Indians is a joke. One can draw on Jefferson's own letters to see he had a hard time coming to terms with the Bible, preferring to cull from it what he considered relevant to a discussion on ethics.

"The whole history of these books [the Gospels] is so defective and doubtful that it seems vain to attempt minute enquiry into it: and such tricks have been played with their text, and with the texts of other books relating to them, that we have a right, from that cause, to entertain much doubt what parts of them are genuine. In the New Testament there is internal evidence that parts of it have proceeded from an extraordinary man; and that other parts are of the fabric of very inferior minds. It is as easy to separate those parts, as to pick out diamonds from dunghills." -- Thomas Jefferson, letter to John Adams, January 24, 1814

Jefferson was a classicist, with a huge library at Monticello devoted to his studies. He had little interest in converting the "natives." He was more concerned with elevating the intellectual life of America, which is why he established the University of Virginia. Mr. Barton would like us to believe in "Lie #2" that Jefferson did not intend this to be a secular school, but rather faith-based, which better suits Barton's own religious temperament. He discards all the classical references which abound in any conventional telling of the founding of the university, choosing instead to focus exclusively on religious aspects. You would think you were reading about Jerry Falwell's Liberty University.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Bastian on December 2, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Confirmation bias has taken many victims over the years. And it's a sure bet that anyone you know who parrots David Barton has also been duped. Best known for providing inaccurate portrayals of the religious views of the founders of this nation, Barton's fact-deprived views have found vast refuge in the religious right of America. Glenn Beck has even called him "one of the most important men alive today." If only.

The Texan native claims to be rescuing history, despite holding absolutely zero credentials in the subject. (He has a bachelor's degree in religious education from Oral Roberts University.) In his books and at speaking engagements he regularly advances ideas at odds with field consensus and well-established facts, such as the claim that America was founded not as a constitutionally secular democracy but as an explicitly Christian nation. According to Barton, Jefferson and his co-founders wanted more religion, not less, in the public sphere, information that's somehow been suppressed by a liberal, anti-Christian educational agenda. Such claims are of course historically untenable, but it's music to many evangelical ears.

Barton's reputation as a serial disinformer came to a head when his 2012 book, ironically titled The Jefferson Lies, was recalled for historical malpractice four months after publication. The book's release was met with a blitz of controversy when it was found that he literally fabricated several of the quotes that appear in the book. As many as a dozen quotations had no primary source to support them. The History News Network later called it "the least credible history book in print.
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