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The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You've Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson Hardcover – April 10, 2012


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The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You've Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson + Separation of Church & State: What the Founders Meant + The Second Amendment
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson; Book Club (BCE/BOMC) edition (April 10, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595554599
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595554598
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (475 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #126,892 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David Barton is the founder and president of WallBuilders, a national pro-family organization that presents America s forgotten history and heroes, with an emphasis on our moral, religious, and constitutional heritage. He is the author of many best-selling books, including Original Intent, The Bulletproof George Washington, American History in Black and White, and The Question of Freemasonry and the Founding Fathers. He addresses more than 400 groups each year. Barton was named by Time magazine as one of America s 25 most influential evangelicals, and he has received numerous national and international awards, including Who s Who in Education and Daughters of the American Revolution s highest award, the Medal of Honor. David and his wife, Cheryl, have three grown children.

More About the Author

David Barton is the founder of WallBuilders, an organization dedicated to presenting America's forgotten history and heroes, with an emphasis on our moral, religious, and constitutional heritage. David is author of numerous best-selling works and a national award-winning historian who brings a fresh perspective to history.

Customer Reviews

"The Jefferson Lies," is a well written, thoroughly researched, fast paced, enjoyable book to read.
Seaotter
One would think that if Jefferson was, in fact, Christian, he would make mention of it somewhere in his writings, but that is most certainly not the case.
Bryan J. Kautzman
In 2012 conservative evangelical publisher Thomas Nelson withdrew from publishing Barton's book The Jefferson Lies because of numerous factual errors.
David Porter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

918 of 1,444 people found the following review helpful By James Ferguson VINE VOICE on April 3, 2012
Format: Hardcover
To look at David Barton, you would think he is a reasonable fellow, but then he opens his mouth and you wonder where on earth his ideas come from. His notion that the Jefferson Bible was some attempt to simplify the Bible for the Indians is a joke. One can draw on Jefferson's own letters to see he had a hard time coming to terms with the Bible, preferring to cull from it what he considered relevant to a discussion on ethics.

"The whole history of these books [the Gospels] is so defective and doubtful that it seems vain to attempt minute enquiry into it: and such tricks have been played with their text, and with the texts of other books relating to them, that we have a right, from that cause, to entertain much doubt what parts of them are genuine. In the New Testament there is internal evidence that parts of it have proceeded from an extraordinary man; and that other parts are of the fabric of very inferior minds. It is as easy to separate those parts, as to pick out diamonds from dunghills." -- Thomas Jefferson, letter to John Adams, January 24, 1814

Jefferson was a classicist, with a huge library at Monticello devoted to his studies. He had little interest in converting the "natives." He was more concerned with elevating the intellectual life of America, which is why he established the University of Virginia. Mr. Barton would like us to believe in "Lie #2" that Jefferson did not intend this to be a secular school, but rather faith-based, which better suits Barton's own religious temperament. He discards all the classical references which abound in any conventional telling of the founding of the university, choosing instead to focus exclusively on religious aspects. You would think you were reading about Jerry Falwell's Liberty University.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By James Bright on July 28, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I love the footnotes to original documents, that makes it easy to explore. In college, I was often frustrated when the footnote trail ended with a quote from a professor and never led to an original document. I'll take first hand info over group-think any day. There is even a history book used in some colleges that simply ignores footnotes altogether. At our fine institutions, it seems the cost goes up while the quality goes down. This book was well worth the price......my college history class, not so much.
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219 of 349 people found the following review helpful By Jim on August 16, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Just a word to the wise, the editor removed 20,000 words from the final book. Many of them the supporting facts. As for having to dig through the footnotes, good. Look up what he is claiming for yourself. The attacks are basing their information on second hand information. One in particular about the Jefferson Bible sites a author who wrote a book on it in the 1960's who claimed in his own footnotes that he didn't include all of the passages Jefferson cut out because he did not think Jefferson actually thought that way.

Go look at the original source, and you will see that your history teacher lied to you.

Oh and guess I will get to read it, seems Mercury Ink will be publishing the ENTIRE book.
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412 of 659 people found the following review helpful By Etaoin Shrdlu on March 29, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Anyone familiar with Mr. Barton's works knows he has as much business calling himself a historian as Alan Alda has calling himself a doctor. As a necessary counterpoint to his writings, allow me to quote Jefferson's actual words on the subject of religion in general, and Christianity in particular. Then decide for yourself who to believe: Barton or Jefferson.

"Where did we get the ten commandments? The book indeed gives them to us verbatim. But where did it get them? . . . . the whole history of these books is so defective and doubtful that it seems vain to attempt minute enquiry into it: and such tricks have been plaid with their text, . . . that we have a right, from that cause, to entertain much doubt what parts of them are genuine. In the New testament there is internal evidence that parts of it have proceeded from an extraordinary man, and that other parts are of the fabric of very inferior minds."

Letter to John Adams (1/24/1814) - page 421 of The Adams-Jefferson Letters (The University of North Carolina Press, 1959).

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"The truth is that the greatest enemies to the doctrines of Jesus are those calling themselves the expositors of them, who have perverted them for the structure of a system of fancy absolutely incomprehensible, and without any foundation in his genuine words. And the day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the supreme being as his father in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter."

Letter to John Adams (4/11/1823) - The Adams-Jefferson Letters page 594.
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328 of 527 people found the following review helpful By Labarum VINE VOICE on May 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The idea of a book countering claims about Thomas Jefferson promoted by some recent secularists is not itself an absurd idea. There has often been far too quick an equivalence made by some secularists today between their own views and those held by Enlightenment era thinkers. When examining the views of the Founding Fathers, we must realize there was quite a range one might occupy that falls between the tenor of the French Englightenment and its Anglo-American counterpart. On the one hand, we have someone like Thomas Paine who was openly hostile to Christianity but others, while also deists like Paine, thought the Church had an important role in promoting a shared moral code of the "golden rule" variety. They believed in God, respected Jesus as a moral example, and might even attend church services while not believing a word of the Gospel message apart from the shared morality. While opposing any imposition of doctrinal positions upon the state, they were not averse to religion having its place in the public square.

Any hopes such a clarification would be forthcoming in David Barton's "The Jefferson Lies" was quickly dispelled by a quick glance at the table of contents (and confirmed by reading the relevant chapter). For example, there is a chapter titled "Lie #7: Thomas Jefferson was an Atheist and Not a Christian." This is the logical fallacy known as the false dichotomy: you produce a pair of alternatives and procede as though they were the only two choices available. There were lots of other things Thomas Jefferson might have been besides Christian and atheist - he could have been a Muslim, a Hindu, a Jew, or a deist.
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