Customer Reviews


37 Reviews
5 star:
 (20)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


54 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Spiritual Swiss-Army Knife!
One of the earlier contemporary bibles to incorporate the results of scholarly study of the Dead Sea Scrolls (cf.Qumrun) was the Jerusalem Bible, originally published in French. Many gifted scholars and writers participated in an English rendering of the Jerusalem Bible ( J. R. R. Tolkien, for example, did the Book of Job) yet there was criticism of the work because it...
Published on November 4, 2000

versus
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars njb
This product is very small in size....may be my own fault for not reading the fine print, but the picture makes it look normal size and it isn't. I had purchased it as a gift for an elderly person and ended up returning it. The print was small, but also didn't think their hands would be able to work it very well either.
Published on May 31, 2012 by jewl


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

54 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Spiritual Swiss-Army Knife!, November 4, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The New Jerusalem Bible, Pocket Edition (Hardcover)
One of the earlier contemporary bibles to incorporate the results of scholarly study of the Dead Sea Scrolls (cf.Qumrun) was the Jerusalem Bible, originally published in French. Many gifted scholars and writers participated in an English rendering of the Jerusalem Bible ( J. R. R. Tolkien, for example, did the Book of Job) yet there was criticism of the work because it was a re-translation from the French. The New Jerusalem Bible again worked from the most recent accepted and examined sources available, and was a direct rendering into contemporary English. This pocket edition is pocket size (though a bit thick for the stylish as opposed to the practical pocket) and does fit easily into brief-case or carry-on luggage. For those who have struggled with the omnipresent King James Version often found in hotel rooms, the New Jersulaem Bible is in thoroughly readable contemporary English. Lacking are the extended foot-notes and introductory essays of the full-size version, which can add much to the reader's appreciation of the organization of the text and the background of its writing. Nonetheless, this is a complete Bible, including the generally found Aprocryphal or deutero-canonical books. It might be added that this translation itself is regarded as an authoritative translation of all of its textual portions by the major denominations, despite the lack of agreement on the status of some of the Apocryphal books. For anyone seeking a highly portable and eminently readable complete Bible, this compact volume is the best choice available.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


39 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Near Perfect Translation of the Old Testament and the New Testament, February 17, 2006
By 
OverTheMoon (overthemoonreview@hotmail.com) - See all my reviews
*This edition of the NJB can fit in your pocket. It is tiny zipper bible designed for carrying around. The print is tiny.

To understand the NJB you need to learn about the JB first. No other bible can be compared to the quality and accuracy of The Jerusalem Bible (1966). It is approved for liturgical use in Europe by the Vatican. That makes it an official Catholic bible. With relaxations of the official church position on bible translations, Alexander Jones of Christ's College, Liverpool took the opportunity as an editor to guide a team of translators in an English language translation of the Holy Bible using a method already accomplished by the Dominican Biblical School in Jerusalem with their production of La Bible de Jérusalem (1956) in French, by means of Hebrew and Greek sources while bypassing the Latin Vulgate (the key reason why the Catholic Church thought long and hard about approving this process). Thus the English version of the JB is not French to English translation as some have erroneously suggested. Along with creating the JB the editors also historically researched each book of the bible, and prepared an introduction for most books along with creating sets of footnotes that would cross-reference the entire bible. The Old Testament sources are the Masoretic texts, with a critical inspection comparison using the Greek Septuagint (the LXX). Since the Dead Sea Scrolls mostly matched the LXX, the JB happens to be the most accurate rendition of the OT. It is even better than the Jewish Tanakh and the Masoretic texts themselves that are not always in line with the Dead Sea Scrolls. The critical combination of the LXX and the Masoretic texts produce a version of the Old Testament of the quality used by Jews and certainly the apostles, at the time of Christ. The inclusion of all the books of the OT, including the `controversial' books erroneously labelled the `apocrypha' by Martin Luther during the reformation, is made on the bases that they are in the LXX (200 BC), the Vulgate (400 AD) and that the removal of them from the OT is a post-crucifixion event by Jews at Jamnia (Council of Jamnia) in 90 AD, again by Martin Luther in the Luther's bible of 1534 before finally being removed altogether by Protestant book publishers between 1825-27 after the Edinburgh Committee of the British and Foreign Bible Society decided simply not to print them anymore. Only the Catholic Church has regarded them as Old Testament with the Dead Sea Scrolls confirming this position (and it is not as if anyone had the right to canonize any other version of the bible after the Catholic Church did it at the Third Council of Carthage in 397 AD). Here they are again, and yes they do include the Books of Maccabees with `prayers for the dead' in tact. The English writer J.R.R. Tolkien has his hand in the style of writing and we even have the insertion of the name "Yahweh" (I AM WHO I AM) for God in reading the Old Testament. The JB (1966) was written before the advent of inclusive language (something that the church believes alters the word of God) so we also have the added bonus of having this fantastic translation without the use of inclusive language. Since it is modern (note, not modernism) you can read it without having to study Shakespeare (as readers of the King James Bible would have to do, resulting in many doctrinal errors also) and come away with a fresh and accurate understanding of the Sacred Scriptures by only reading it once (slowly though I might add), still there is nothing like it in terms of quality, ease of use and correctness. Alexander Jones, who obviously had a firm understanding of what went wrong with other bible translations, has done what all others have failed to do. There are some very minor quibbles about its use of short text in some passages of the NT and so the JB was revised in 1985 by Henry Wansbrough and the new version was called The New Jerusalem Bible (NJB) but was rejected by the Holy See for its use of inclusive language (still the NJB is an amazing bible, but not for liturgical use). Even though the publication of the NJB was not approved, the NJB was widely circulated and had an impact on the JB to the point of putting it out of print. However recent demand for the originally approved JB has brought it back into circulation again, only not without what might be considered a shortcoming. Unlike the perfect print and typeset of the NJB all versions of the JB are photocopies of the 1966 version and have not been typeset again. Don't be disappointed to find the odd photocopied hair appearing across the page of a JB. However this is only cribbing, the text still looks as good as most bibles, just not as perfect as the NJB, and the fact that the JB has never been typeset means that you can not get a digital version of the JB, unlike the NJB that has been reproduced for bible study software packages. You can only own the JB on the printed page. The fact that the JB is not in digital has its disadvantages for serious bible scholars who like to run word searches, so in this case a digital NJB is highly recommended, but at the same time this means that the JB can only be read in the way it was presented, on the printed page, in a bound hardcover book, and this is precisely how the JB should be read, and precisely how sacred scripture should be presented. You can read the NJB in the same way by choosing the hardback version. The numbering system seems to disappear at times within the text, but this is in fact a method used by the JB to keep the original flow of sacred scripture. Sometimes the chapter number system actually broke the text in places where it should not have been, a bad tradition continued today because of this numbering system. Thus you will be reading chapters only to discover a small 5 instead of a big 5 like the 4 before it and the 6 after it. This method keeps the original chapter breaks of the books of bible that have long been lost to the numbering system. You have never read a bible like this one before. Quite simply I would deeply consider shelving all other bibles that you have and also getting a JB as your core official bible and using this NJB for any quick double-checks that need to be made. Citing from the JB shows that you have (1) Understood the acumen involved in its translation, (2) a desire to ensure that everyone who doesn't speak Shakespeare can comprehend you and the Word of God and (3) want to keep the Canon of books that Christ and the Apostles used that was canonized at the Third Council of Carthage, (4) want to use an officially approved bible (something that the NJB is not, but it is still very high quality all the same.) Reading the JB or the NJB is a miracle in itself. Never has our Justification through Faith in Jesus Christ because his forgiveness for our Sins by way of the Cross and Resurrection of the Body been made so absolute in print.

*Note: Personally I own a full size JB hardback and this mini zipper bible version of the NJB. This means I can take the NJB with me to church or places in my pocket. The JB is kept as a full size bible and is certainly the more authoritative of the two because of its liturgical usage. I know this does have an impact on those who came here to buy a NJB, but the JB is the one officially approved by the Holy See, not the NJB. However that does not mean that the NJB is not a good bible, it is, extremely so.)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Easy Read in Contemporary English!, March 30, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The New Jerusalem Bible, Pocket Edition (Hardcover)
This was my first reading of the Bible. I began with the New Testament and once done, read the Old Testament. It was like watching Star Wars and then watching the prequel where the foundational history is detailed. Somewhere in the middle, I knew I was well on the way on the road to the straight and narrow.
I found the contempory English easy to follow and highly recommend it to those who have never read the Bible as well as to those looking for a compact travelling companion.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Too Bad You Have to Buy from the UK, November 1, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
For those of you who love the New Jerusalem Bible, but would like a compact edition, this is it. There's only one problem. It's not supposed to be sold to the US which I discovered after receiving it, but I ordered it and it was shipped without a problem. We have the NAB compact edition and the RSV-CE compact zippered, but I really and truly prefer the NJB, and this is exactly what I was looking for. There is not an American publisher promoting this compact version.

Update 2/2/2014 -
There are a lot of 1 and 2 star reviews from people who were upset over the size, so I'll update. I think such reviews are unfair because it suggests a deficiency in a product that arrives exactly as advertised. The dimensions are listed in the product description. 6"x4.5"x1.7" (it's right there in the description) That it's a zippered bible means the paper is even smaller since more than 1/2" lengthwise and width-wise is devoted to accommodation of the zipper. That the text is tiny in such a small Bible should go without saying, but the text is tiny. This Bible can squeeze into some pockets, although it's pushing the boundary of a pocket Bible. I suppose they could have photographed it next to a dime or held in the hand for size purposes, because that's the only way that I can think of to photograph small.

Edit: And it's currently listed for over $200 by some sellers. That's absurd.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The New Jerusalem Bible, Pocket Leather Edition with Zipper, March 8, 2007
I just received this and I am very happy with the purchase. I needed a Bible for an overseas study abroad trip that includes the apocryphal/deuterocanonical books. The NJB is a very good translation that often captures intricate nuances of the text especially in the Hebrew Bible that other english translations do not communicate as effectively. The Bible is very compact, which is what I wanted. My only complaint is that it lacks scholarly notes such as those that are available in the larger NJB, in the JPS Jewish Study Bible, or in the NOAB version of the NRSV, but I wanted a small Bible and it can't be expected to have those kinds of notes if it is compact, so it works out perfect. The zipper is a bit awkward, but not to the point of being overly bothersome. Overall a very good product. I wish they carried them in the U.S.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, take-anywhere Bible!, September 27, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The New Jerusalem Bible, Pocket Edition (Hardcover)
This edition is so much easier to keep with me than the large (6.5"x9.5"x2") New Jerusalem Bible I also own. In addition, since it is so much lighter, it is much easier for me to hold while reading in bed. Very sturdy and well-made too. If you can find a good copy, don't hesitate to snatch it up!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Handy and Durable..., June 14, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Edition I received was a sturdy, very stiff, rough textured, bonded leather in a black cardboard slipcase, not the genuine leather with zipper closure. Well made and built to last. Small, vintage looking typeset. Notes and book introductions are different and much less extensive than the standard NJB. They are a nice mix between the traditional and more contemporary scholarship approaches. The trade off between portability and readability may make this edition unsuitable for some.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SUPERB publication of The BIBLE, June 15, 2012
By 
Jim Girzone (Troy, N ew York,, USA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
What more can I say about such a publication other than that it is immensely more easily readable that scores of others bearing the same Title. It is so much more readable and understandable that I am easily led to it for deeper understanding of an otherwise difficult subject matter. One wouldn't be disappointed if acquiring it and I would be immensely surprised to find that anyone who currently has it, would disagree.

Jim G
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars njb, May 31, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This product is very small in size....may be my own fault for not reading the fine print, but the picture makes it look normal size and it isn't. I had purchased it as a gift for an elderly person and ended up returning it. The print was small, but also didn't think their hands would be able to work it very well either.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful travelling bible, January 24, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The New Jerusalem Bible, Pocket Edition (Hardcover)
It is not literally "pocket size", but still small and light enough to fit comfortably in your briefcase or hand luggage. Perfectly readable without straining your eyes. It does not carry the excellent notes of the regular size New Jerusalem Bible but still is a wonderful travelling bible, which is exactly what I was looking for.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The New Jerusalem Bible, Pocket Edition
The New Jerusalem Bible, Pocket Edition by Henry Wansbrough (Hardcover - July 1, 1993)
Used & New from: $4.25
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.