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Comment: Condition: Very good condition., Very good dust jacket. Binding: Hardcover / Publisher: University of South Carolina Press / Pub. Date: 2000-10 Attributes: 517pp / Illustrations: B&W Illustrations Stock#: 2057477 (FBA) * * *This item qualifies for FREE SHIPPING and Amazon Prime programs! * * *
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The Jewish Confederates (NS) Hardcover – October 15, 2000


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 536 pages
  • Publisher: University of South Carolina Press (October 15, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1570033633
  • ISBN-13: 978-1570033636
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 7.2 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #110,216 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

While prominent, largely forgotten Jewish leaders such as Confederate Secretary of State Judah Benjamin and Q.M. Gen. Abraham C. Myers are re-examined in Rosen's account of the Jewish confederacy, the real contribution of this book to Civil War scholarship is its thorough look at the contradictions and ironies implied by the title, and the capsule biographical sketches of quite a few of the 2,000 Jewish men who served in the Confederate army and navy. Looking at the total Southern Jewish population of less than 25,000Abased mainly in the cities of Memphis, Nashville, Mobile and ShreveportARosen concludes that, contrary to the commonly held idea of "old" Jewish families being the mainstay of the contingent, the typical Jewish soldier was a recent immigrant who "enlisted to prove he was a man and a worthy citizen"Aalbeit a citizen sometimes subject to prejudices just as virulent as anti-black racism. In addition to tracking the exploits of many soldiers, Rosen also chronicles the trials and tribulations of Jewish civilians behind the lines and the growth of anti-Semitism as the war progressed. This groundbreaking study is liberally illustrated with photographs and maps, and is written clearly and energetically as a trade book, despite its academic stamp and thoroughness. (Oct.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

A native of Charleston, SC, Rosen (Confederate Charleston: An Illustrated History of the Place and the People During the Civil War) uses his own background and experience to recount the lives of Southern Jews from the 1700s until well after the Civil War. Loyal Southerners, the Jews accepted living in a slaveholding society, and their young men flocked to enlist when war came. The author delves into the lives of a number of prominent individuals and families, among them two U.S. senators, Judah Philip Benjamin of Louisiana and David Levy Yulee of Florida. The experiences of many other enlisted men, officers, nurses, politicians, rabbis, doctors, and businessmen are also chronicled. Rosen also explains why so many Jews chose the South as their home and why they remained loyal to it, arguing that Southern society and the Confederate army and navy may have been more tolerant of Jews than the North. The glossary provides definitions of Judaic terms. Larger public and academic libraries should consider this readable book, as should all libraries with strong Judaic or military collections.DDavid Alperstein, Queens Borough P.L., Jamaica, NY
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

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Read it and pass it on to all Civil War buffs.
Jackie Lynn
Robert Rosen has put together a masterfully written book about a generally unknown element of Jewish and Southern history.
ManFromToronto
In the American South, many Jews found that was worth fighting for against an invasion from afar.
Dr. Victor S. Alpher

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Michael Charton on December 20, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I grew up, a Jew in the Northeast. I lived in a small Southern town for four years, working as a librarian. I became fascinated by what I read about Jews serving the Confederate cause. I read whatever I could get on Confederate Sec. of State Judah Benjamin. I wish Mr. Rosen had written this book 15 years ago. It is never too late, though. This book should be in every Civil War collection, Southern Genealogy and University collections, and educated American. Another look at a tragic war that nearly tore this nation apart.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Walter Woodman on February 19, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This outstanding work is highly recommended. It shatters previous myths and misunderstandings about Jewish life in the old South and during the War for Southern Independence commonly called the "Civil War" by northern historians. Rosen has exhaustively covered the source material and brought to light information and facts that have been buried with the passage of time. This book will be the foundation starting point for any legitimate historical inquiry into this area for decades to come. The book is well printed, well illustrated, and a pleasure to behold and would make an outstanding addition to any library.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan M. Fox on January 29, 2001
Format: Hardcover
In Mongtomery Alabama, the spot were Jefferson Davis took the oath of Office as President of the Conferatate States of America is marked by a star of david. This is said to reflect the mark that J.P. Benjamian made on the Confederary. Although small in numbers the Jewish poplulation of the Confederacy seems to have fully invoved in the war effor. I guess when your flighting a war of national survival you do not have any time to be anti semantic. This book is just the type of new scholarship that is needed if we are to rescue Conferate history from the P.C. types that see the Union Amry as some sort of very well armed civil right protest movment, and the nuts that march with Nazi and Confederate Battle Flags
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By ManFromToronto on December 12, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Robert Rosen has put together a masterfully written book about a generally unknown element of Jewish and Southern history. He provides and indepth account of the contributions of Jewish soldiers and citizens to the Conferedate war effort, as well as a look into the life of Judah P. Benjamin, a Jewish senetor from Lousianna who went on to become Jefferson Davis' right hand man. Rosen also provides a description of Jewish settlement and life in the Old South, as well as a look into the relationship between Jewish and Christian Southerners. A must read for those who are interested in Jewish or Southern history.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Cowboy Professor on December 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Wonderful! I'm a Southern Jewish man who's very proud of his heritage, and I used this book when I was doing research for a paper I presented in October. First, the word needs to be spread that there was a Jewish Confederacy. (When I presented, my audience seemed amazed about this. And I might add that the paper was well-received.) Second, overall, Southern Jews were not that much different from other Rebels. No, they weren't all rich boys who could buy their way out of fighting. Third, it's too bad that certain Southern Jews have been omitted in U.S. history classes. I can't remember reading about or hearing about Judah Benjamin in high school or in college. This is a fascinating work for both Jews and non-Jews, and it's a beautiful book as well.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Victor S. Alpher on February 15, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
First, I commend Robert Rosen for his dedication to this subject and for publishing this work. I am sure that it ought to be as controversial as recent books (and film) showing dedication of Blacks to the Southern Cause for Independence. I recall as a child watching the march on Montgomery, the seat of the first Confederate Capitol, before it was moved to Richmond. And had it remained in Montgomery, what then?
Mr. Rosen, an attorney, is clear with his research. Anyone who might wonder why Jews would fight for the Confederacy, or Blacks for that matter, will find this fascinating. Jews from South Carolina, from Louisiana, many of German or Spanish (Sephardic) heritage, were there. I hope that more books, and personal accounts, will follow, from groups whose support for the rights of the States to determine their destinies will be forthcoming. We must learn from history.
Anyone who would hope to understand what it means to be an American should have this book on the shelf, and read it. To paraphrase Shelby Foote, before this war, the United States could only be conceived of as a plurality, after, a singularity. Yet today, we are no doubt in danger of falling into an abyss of pluralism that threatens any kind of national identity. Yet Irishmen fought one another--at Fredericksburg, and elsewhere--as did Jews, and Blacks, and Hispanics--across stone walls at point-blank range, leaving a legacy of maiming of soul and flesh. We have only to look back 3 score years to the bloodbath of Europe to see we are not yet free.
Jews fought for home and hearth, "Pro Aris et Pro Focis"--a common Latin phrase embroidered on flags North and South. In the American South, many Jews found that was worth fighting for against an invasion from afar. That experience unites them with us, today.
Most highly recommended for scholarship and readability!
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Robert C. Hufford on June 30, 2007
Format: Hardcover
....that The Confederacy had Jews. Surprise...A true story: in my exam room, there is always a book on my side table. One day, this was the book; a young girl [I take care of Army Privates] went over and picked it up as if she were touching pork. She informed me that the book was a lie, because there could not possibly have been any Jews in The Confederacy. I pointed to Judah Benjamin's picture among the other Confederate heroes on my wall and told her his story, including the slave owning. She was appalled. She soon knew that the CSA had around 2000 Jews, from Private to Colonel. Then, she asked me the question for which I still have no answer: "How is it that I, a Jew, living in America, don't know that significant a part of my own history?" Sadly, she's a very bright girl, who just didn't know. Much more sadly, BOTH of her parents are history professors. The encounter happened right before Christmas break, and she informed me that she was going to ask her mother about the matter. I gave her several references, and wished her Happy Chanukkah. After the break, she said that her Mom told her that, yes, this is something they knew, but just don't talk about. Look, all of us who deal with history can tell stories of astonishing ignorance. But I've never forgotten that girl; whenever I see ignorance, she reminds me of the obligation that all us who know have to impart [gently] unto those who don't.

Bob Rosen, has, indeed, imparted, and done it superbly. He gives us the story of all the major, and many of the minor, Jews who saluted the Stars and Bars. The two most prominant Jewish Confederates, Judah P.
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