The Journals of Eleanor Druse and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $30.99
  • Save: $7.85 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by meinuobooks
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Journals of Eleanor Druse: My Investigation of the Kingdom Hospital Incident Hardcover – January 16, 2004


See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$23.14
$0.74 $0.01
Paperback, Import
"Please retry"
$0.01
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$5.03
Multimedia CD
"Please retry"
Year-End%20Deals%20in%20Books


Frequently Bought Together

The Journals of Eleanor Druse: My Investigation of the Kingdom Hospital Incident + Kingdom Hospital
Price for both: $31.79

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 244 pages
  • Publisher: Kingswell; 1st edition (January 16, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401301231
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401301231
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,613,514 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Eleanor Druse is a career spiritualist who has devoted her time recently to organizing these journals for publication. She lives outside of Lewiston, Maine.

From AudioFile

Sudden death, unexplained supernatural events, and interactions with ghosts come together in a hospital mystery that focuses on the paranormal in Lewiston, Maine. Having a little fun with his readers, Stephen King has created a fictional character who acts as both author and narrator of this audiobook. Druse investigates ghost sightings, encounters noncorporeal beings, and works with doctors who seek to solve the mystery of her ability to communicate with the dead. Contrary to what the audiobook cover states, an unnamed narrator reads Druse's first-person account competently and fluently as she describes her personal involvement in the events at her local hospital. An introductory letter to Stephen King creates the tie-in to the TV series "Kingdom Hospital." Druse's investigation is incomplete, encouraging listeners to await the next installment of her adventures. M.B.K. © AudioFile 2004, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

It was a decent book up to the abrupt and unsatisfying ending.
M. Runkle
The "story" ends abruptly with no resolution, presumably to make one sure to tune in to get one, which makes me feel cheap and used.
lookatherglasses
I really wanted to give this a 4.5 rating, but since that's unavailable, I chose 5 stars.
No Zombies

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Eileen Rieback on February 2, 2004
Format: Hardcover
When Eleanor Druse is called to the hospital deathbed of an old childhood friend who has attempted suicide, she experiences gruesome hallucinations, both visual and auditory, and then blacks out. These events leads doctors to conclude that Eleanor has a brain abnormality and epilectic seizures. Eleanor believes no such thing. Instead she is certain that her extrasensory abilities have allowed her to view ghosts that haunt Kingdom Hospital.
Reminiscent of The Diary of Ellen Rimbauer and its tie-in to the TV miniseries Rose Red, this novel disguised as nonfiction is a tie-in to the Stephen King TV series Kingdom Hospital. It consists of Eleanor's journals of her investigation into the paranormal occurrences at the hospital, the identity of a child whose phantom cries only she can hear, and the secrets of her own past. The novel reveals an explanation for only part of the mysteries Eleanor is investigating. Her introduction to the journal, a cover letter to Stephen King, warns "Please read these pages as an introduction only to what I believe will one day be a complete scientific assessment of the remarkable occurrences witnessed by myself and others at Kingdom Hospital..." Although this book sets the scene for the TV series that follows, it can stand alone on its own merits.
I recommend this novel as a well-crafted blend of the factual and the fictional. You will learn something about neurological diseases and their treatment as the doctors deal with Eleanor's hallucinations. You will shiver at the spookiest of supernatural events as Eleanor attempts to bridge the gap between the past and the present, and between life and the first state of the afterlife.
Eileen Rieback
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 22, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is just a really fun read. Once you are hooked in bt Eleanor's loser son telling her what is going on, you turn page after page as she uncovers creepy and ultimately unspeakable things going on at the veerable Kingdom Hospital. The book does a nice job setting out that Eleanor is "special" in her ability to sniff out the paranormal and that despite everyones protestations that there is something terribly wrong at the hospital. It is troubling that through most of the book we are never quite sure whether things are really twisted or whether she is crazy and imagining things due to electrochemical malfunctions in her brain The medical professionals will cringe at the prima donna's showcased in this creepy book. I miss the Stephen King who formerly wrote books of a readable length that I could run through in a few nights of diligent reading. This book is a return to form that seems to have a little more of a rock and roll beat. I hate TV but I can't wait for the show.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Dr Beverly R Vincent VINE VOICE on January 28, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The white lettering on the front cover of The Journals of Eleanor Druse: My Investigation of the Kingdom Hospital Incident cover glows ominously in the dark. The unexpected effect is eerie and a little unsettling. The tiny word "Fiction" in faint red text on the back cover stands out less clearly and is the only thing that indicates the book is a novel.
Its predecessor, The Diary of Ellen Rimbauer , tied in to the Rose Red miniseries, was a bestseller partly because many believed King wrote it (it was actually written by Ridley Pearson) and partly because some people thought the book was based on a real supernatural investigation.
The Journals opens with a letter to King by Eleanor (Sally to her friends) Druse, asking for help in carrying out her research into the events at Kingdom Hospital in Maine, where she has uncovered an otherworldly crisis. She wants King to have her journals, recorded between late 2002 and 2003, in case something happens to her.
The septuagenarian is a volunteer and regular patient at Kingdom Hospital, well known by staff and patients alike. One of her oldest friends, Madeline Kruger, is hospitalized on a stormy winter night after attempting suicide. In 1939, Sally and Maddy were both admitted to the old Kingdom Hospital, suffering from whooping cough, shortly before the hospital burned to the ground.
Maddy leaves behind a message indicating that something happened to them sixty years ago that Sally has successfully banished from her memory. Perhaps something related to the mysterious lesion that appears on a brain scan taken after Sally collapses and strikes her head when she witnesses something horrible after Maddy dies.
Sally is a believer in mystical events and often conducts siances with her fellow patients at the hospital.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
45 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Stacey Cochran on February 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover
In 1996, Stephen King was in Estes Park, Colorado, where filming of "Stephen King's The Shining" TV-mini series was taking place. In a video rental store, he saw a copy of Lars Von Trier's Kingdom Hospital, and he rented it and watched it in the very same town (Estes Park) where, nearly twenty years earlier, he was inspired to write The Shining. (see[...] for a wonderful interview with Kingdom Hospital's director Mark Carliner that explains these origins in detail).

No one was able to secure the rights nor much interest in what Stephen King initially saw as a potential hit-TV show, until fate intervened three years later, and King was struck by a van and nearly died. While recovering from the accident, Stephen King spent a lot of time in hospitals, and Von Trier's idea recurred to him. He wrote 15 hours of television scripts for a new TV show, Kingdom Hospital. Based largely on those scripts, ABC secured the rights to Von Trier's original idea, and preproduction began on the show.

The Journals of Eleanor Druse is a 244-page fictional account of a woman who visits that hospital in Lewiston, Maine, only to discover that the hospital has a sordid history and may be haunted. The story is told in the 1st-person point of view of this old lady who most people think is more than a little daffy. Eleanor claims to hear a young girl crying in the hospital's elevator, and the story takes on a conspiracy tone wherein the doctors do not believe Eleanor (or are trying to cover up what she knows). Keep in mind all of this is told from Eleanor's perspective, and as such the credibility of the narrator itself becomes suspect, which is also part of the fun of the novel.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?