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The Joy of Calvinism: Knowing God's Personal, Unconditional, Irresistible, Unbreakable Love Paperback – February 29, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Crossway (February 29, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1433528347
  • ISBN-13: 978-1433528347
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #692,148 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A refreshing, clearly-written, thought-provoking, truly enjoyable book that will help overcome many misconceptions and deepen people’s faith and joy in God each day.”
Wayne Grudem, Research Professor of Theology and Biblical Studies, Phoenix Seminary

“Calvinism gets a lot of bad press because of its joyless believers. Yet joyless Calvinism is an oxymoron. Forster has helped reframe this beautiful understanding of God in the Scriptures in a way that is attractive and compelling.”
Darrin Patrick, Lead Pastor, The Journey, St. Louis, Missouri; Vice President, Acts 29; Chaplain to the St. Louis Cardinals; author, The Dude's Guide to Manhood

“Forster pulls few punches with his critiques both for Calvinists and also their opponents—this vigor is what makes this exploration of joyous Calvinism so welcome and challenging.”
Collin Hansen, Editorial Director, The Gospel Coalition; coauthor, A God-Sized Vision: Revival Stories That Stretch and Stir

“Concerned that some of the negative press which Calvinism receives is actually provoked by Calvinists themselves, Forster here offers a refreshing restatement of the Reformed faith. In the tradition of the personal, pastoral confidence and joy one finds in the Heidelberg Catechism, he presents an account of the Reformed understanding of salvation that is accessible, reliable, and delightful. A super book to read for oneself or to give to Christian friends who may never have understood the joy that lies at the heart of Calvinism.”
Carl R. Trueman, Pastor, Cornerstone Presbyterian Church, Ambler, Pennsylvania; Professor of Church History, Westminster Theological Seminary; author, The Creedal Imperative and Luther on the Christian Life

“Calvinism has been the target of countless caricatures, but none so misguided as the notion that it is the enemy of joy. Forster insists rightly that Calvinism is ‘drenched with joy,’ and has done a masterful job of accounting for the beauty and delight intrinsic to biblical Calvinism. I pray this book gets a wide reading.”
Sam Storms, Lead Pastor for Preaching and Vision, Bridgeway Church, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

“Forster does a wonderful, twofold service for God’s people in this book—he retrieves Calvinism from portrayal as a dark and distasteful version of Christianity and, instead, presents it as an attractive and beautiful expression of biblical religion. Forster speaks with deep wisdom rooted not only in a well-informed theology, but also in his own experience as he wrestled with the sufferings of life and ultimately found comfort in the God who is profoundly merciful and sovereign in Christ. I highly recommend this book for all who seek godly encouragement and joy in the midst of life’s trials.”
David VanDrunen, Robert B. Strimple Professor of Systematic Theology and Christian Ethics, Westminster Seminary California

About the Author

Greg Forster (PhD, Yale University) is a program director at the Kern Family Foundation and a senior fellow at the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice. He also the editor of the group blog Hang Together and a regular contributor to the Gospel Coalition, First Thoughts, and other online resources. Forster is the author of numerous articles and six books, including The Joy of Calvinism. His writing covers theology, economics, political philosophy, and education policy.


More About the Author

Greg Forster (PhD, Yale University) is a program director at the Kern Family Foundation and a senior fellow at the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice. He also the editor of the group blog Hang Together and a regular contributor to the Gospel Coalition, First Thoughts, and other online resources. Forster is the author of numerous articles and six books, including The Joy of Calvinism. His writing covers theology, economics, political philosophy, and education policy.

Customer Reviews

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It is to prove this point that he has written The Joy of Calvinism.
Michael Leake
Forster says: ...many Calvinist writers seem to agree that the five points are a lousy way to describe Calvinism!
Richard Hogaboam
God's love is personal in that He chose the individuals who will accept Jesus Christ's proprieties for their sins.
Philip S. Roeda

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Joan N. on February 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
Foster reminds us of the command to rejoice without ceasing. He writes, "...if you want to understand the command to rejoice at all times, and still more if you want to obey it, of all places you might start looking for help with that problem, the best place to start is with Calvinism." (14) More specifically, soteriology - the understanding of how sinners are saved - as developed from Calvin.
"Real Calvinism is all about joy." (16) We Calvinists need to do a better job of communicating that. We need to be affirmative, expressing the joy of living in the truth of Calvinistic theology. Foster gives us a blueprint for that very task in this book.
His goal is, "to tell you what Calvinism says, especially what it says about your everyday walk with God and the purpose of the Christian life, and how you can have the joy of God even in spite of whatever trials and suffering the Lord has called you to endure." (22)
Most people are badly mistaken about Calvinism (even Calvinists) so Foster takes a detour and clears up some mistaken thoughts about Calvinism. (As a Calvinist myself, I really appreciated this section.)
Foster tackles God's love for individuals (as opposed to God loving "humanity" in general), and what that means regarding salvation. (It is an excellent passage.) He also notes that Calvinism is not "all about predestination and God's sovereignty" though he does note Calvinists have a "high" view of those areas to preserve other important doctrines. He notes that a distinctive of Calvin's theology was a "high" view of the work of the Holy Spirit (supernatural regeneration).
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By The Lorax on February 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
Greg Foster has written a fascinating, helpful, and dense book for us in his The Joy of Calvinism. Right from the start - even from the introduction - I realized that this book was not going to go at all as I had anticipated it...and that was a good thing. Instead of a popular-level read on why Calvinism both makes sense and leads to joy, Foster has written a philosophical treatise on the merits of Calvinism as being the most straightforward manner to put the pieces of the Bible together and THAT should lead us to joy. Foster often does a "compare and contrast" between how a Calvinist would understand a passage and how those in other camps might see the passage - at times this is quite helpful though at other times I couldn't help but wonder if those in other camps would see Foster's characterization of them as accurate (note: I'm not saying that Foster is wrong, but rather I am saying that those whom Foster criticizes wouldn't necessarily agree with his understanding of their positions). That said, on to the review itself:

The challenge begins with the first chapter itself - "Detour" in which Foster challenges just about every preconception of Calvinism that there is and shows how Calvinism is often misunderstood both by its critics and its defenders. One of the most helpful sections in this chapter concerns the two understandings of free will: "Who is more free, the sober and self-controlled man or the addict? Who is more free, the man with nature and well-ordered desires or the pervert? In one sense, they are all equally free. That is, they are all free to act within the bounds of their capacities...and they are fully responsible for their actions.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Matt Boswell on March 19, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Last month I had gone back and reread Sproul's "Grace Unknown" (aka "What Is Reformed Theology"). While it still ranks as among my favorite beginner lessons in the "The Doctrines of Grace / The Five Points of Calvinism," it also lacks something that Forster brings to the table - joyful wonder.

I will not go into a long review of this book for one reason; it's so good you should just read it for yourself. I agree with another reviewer who pointed out that writers such as Piper and Packer unpack these things in a more through way, but they do so indirectly. Their works are less about looking at Calvinism's "Five Points" and more about Calvinists looking at God with different "points of five" appearing here and there. Forster on the other hand tackles the doctrines of grace straight on and in a way far more inspirational than just how each point relies on the next for a cogent argument. As an added bonus Forster tosses in obscure factual nuggets or under-utilized philosophical ideas that make the book feel a bit more like learning about the five points all over again. It was that freshness that perhaps most caught my attention and jumps Forster's book to the top of my "favorites on the five points" list.

One thing I am still undecided on is where having some basic knowledge of the five points is helpful or not in reading the book. Forster doesn't make much use of the traditional labels for each point (i.e. TULIP). If you know the points then you know what he is talking about as he speaks to the content of each point while bypassing the brand. If on the other hand you didn't know the traditional labels when you started you still won't by the time you finish. The ideas? Yes! The labels? No!
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