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The Joy of Pickling Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Common Press (October 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1558321330
  • ISBN-13: 978-1558321335
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 7 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #684,331 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Pickling food seems like a form of culinary alchemy to most of us. Or we recall it as something grandmothers used to do, laboring over heaps of vegetables and huge, steaming kettles to turn out jars of jewel-like pickles and piquant chutneys.

In the first chapter of The Joy of Pickling, Linda Ziedrich demystifies the pickling process. She explains the difference between fresh pickles made with vinegar and longer-keeping, salt-preserved, fermented pickles. Her detailed explanation of canning methods, including low-temperature pasteurization, shows how to avoid risky problems.

After reading the opening of this pickle primer, go straight to the "Quick" and "Freezer Pickle" chapters and discover how easy it is to make Green Olives with Lemon and Thyme and Freezer Dill Slices without any sterilizing, boiling, or safety issues. In addition, you get to enjoy them within 24 hours. When you are more confident, let Ziedrich guide you through pickling Spicy Broccoli, Pig Ears, Korean Kimchi, and Irish Corned Beef. Her three recipes for pickled eggs are also bound to please. --Dana Jacobi

From Library Journal

Hassol, who has a small jam-making business on Cape Cod, writes evocatively about her life there: her friends and family, the guests at her bed-and-breakfast, and the business she started several years ago. She provides 70 recipes for delicious small-batch jams and jellies, along with some breads and muffins to go with them, grouped into chapters with titles like "Nonnie and the Elderberries" and "Chasing the Wild Cranberry." Ziedrich, who might be called a pickle fanatic, offers a detailed and informative guide to pickles of all sorts, including kimchi and others from Asia, chutneys and salsas, and "freezer pickles," along with traditional favorites like Half-Sours by the Quart. She writes readably and knowledgeably about a variety of topics, and her varied and unusual recipes should tempt readers into trying at least a pickle or two, or more. Anyone interested in preserving will welcome both of these books, which are recommended for most collections.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

I write about food and rural life from my family's homestead near Scio, Oregon, where I continually experiment with the produce from our orchard and large garden. The Joy of Pickling, The Joy of Jams, Jellies, and Other Sweet Preserves, and Cold Soups are the fruit of my empirical research as well as my studies of culinary traditions around the world.

For more information about my work, see my website at www.lindaziedrich.com and my blog at www.agardenerstable.com.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 26 customer reviews
Easy reader with simple instructions.
T. Marcroft
This is by far the pickling book I turn to first and keep trying different recipes from, while several recipes have become oft-repeated favorites.
J. Rosen
I highly recommend this book for all skill levels!
A. OMALLEY

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

53 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Little Dorrit on September 6, 2001
Format: Paperback
I love this cookbook! Right now my garden is full to overflowing with ripening veggies and for the last few years that I've had this cookbook, I've worn it out this time of year. Why do I love it? The recipes have proven to be very reliable and by that I mean that every recipe I've tried from it has not needed much if any 'fine tuning' and the results have been consistently terrific.
I hate it when a cookbook includes too many exotic ingredients that are hard to find in my very rural area, and the only thing I've found difficult to obtain that this book calls for is white wine vinegar. I've solved that problem by asking the nearest grocer to order a case for me! I use so many of the recipes in this book that I'll easily use a case in a year or two.
Favorites from the book? The Szechuan Vegetable pickle recipe that lets me take a variety of our produce and layer them together with a simple salt/water/spices mixture, leave at room temp and then store in refrigerator. They get better and better and are super served as a side dish with rice.
I've also got to give rave reviews to the fruit pickle recipes. The sweetness and depth of flavor of the pickled pears and other fruit are a real treat to add to holiday meals. I just harvested lots of winter squash and will begin making the sweet pickled pumpkin and squash recipe today. Pickling and preserving are truly fulfilling acts and thanks to this great book, they are also easy and delicious.
If you've never pickled anything, this book won't confuse you with anything but the simple basics of preserving. If you are a seasoned preserver, you'll find some wonderful new ways to keep that harvest.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 11, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a great book for new pickling ideas, and the quantities are reasonable for trying new things out (you dont need bushels and buckets for most of them. The blueberry preserves and pickles are great, peach chutney is wonderful, and the asparagus is now a family favorite. The home made catsup is a bit of work, but worth it.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 14, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Linda has brought a wonderful variety of pickling recipes from around the world together in one book. The latest USDA pocedures and processes are used and described in great detail. Which I think is just wonderful. From reading her little notes on these recipes you just know she has tried these recipes her self and you just can't wait to try them out. Just thinking about my next project gets my mouth watering. This is a must have in the preserving kitchen.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 28, 1998
Format: Paperback
A very well done book with recipes from Germany, Russia, Korea and many others countries as well as the USA. The best I've found with the most recipes.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By NancyS on April 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book is wonderful addition to my cookbook collection. I'm very picky about cookbooks but the minute I got this one home from the library I was hooked. I ordered my own copy the next day. I love the chapter on "Unique Pickles of the Far East". My fridge is never without Korean or Mrs. Kim's pickled garlic; it's so convenient to pluck a peeled, pickled clove or two out of a jar when a meal needs garlic. The chapter on "Quick Pickles" was made for impatient souls like me, these pickles are ready in 2 days or so. There is also a great chapter on chutneys and relishes. Yum! There are so many pickle recipes besides the obvious cukes and green beans. "Joy of Pickling" includes prunes, shrimp, mangoes, purslane, Jicama and many other surprises.

If your garden (or friend's garden or farmer's market) runneth over, and you like pickled foods, you won't know how you lived without this book.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By M. Stone VINE VOICE on July 1, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If "Making Sauerkraut and Pickled Vegetables at Home" is an introductory guide, think of "The Joy of Pickling" as the definitive handbook of pickles and pickling.

The book starts out with a 30 page primer on the art and science of pickling. All of the mysteries of pickling methods are revealed here. This chapter alone is worth the price of the book, but there is so much more.

The next chapter is 44 pages devoted to the healthiest of all pickles, the lactic-fermented vegetable. Cucumbers are here, as you would suspect, as are radishes, turnips, cucumber kimchi, mustard greens, cherry tomatoes, apples, bean sprouts, and a Turkish mixed-pickle.

On page 63 is one of many education side-bar articles. This one is about "the perfect pickle pot". An old Chinese design with a built in airlock. You can expect this sort of educational experience all the way through the book. I have never before seen a recipe book as a "page turner" before picking this up.

There is a section on "fresh" pickles. These are pickles that are not fermented but instead are preserved with vinegar. This topic is exhausted with nearly 100 pages of recipes and insight.

Next up is my favorite section. Cabbages! I have long been a fan of kimchi but it is so expensive at the local grocery. Now I make it by the gallon. (For which my wife is thankful of the walk-in pantry.) There are also German sauerkraut recipes, Chinese sour cabbage, in fact, more versions of pickled cabbage than I ever knew existed, and I have loved every one of them.

Now it may sound like a lot to cram into a single book, but to be honest, there are six sections I haven't even covered.

Chapter 5 is devoted to pickles from the far east.
Chapter 6 is a collection of sweet pickles.
Read more ›
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