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183 of 198 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Real Thing
My favorite books from childhood have always been Milne's "The World of Pooh" and Kipling's "The Jungle Book". Over the years I have purchased many copies of each as presents. Both can be difficult to find in versions unaltered from the original. I have found this to be particularly true in the case of The Jungle Book. Some folks just don't seem to get that Kipling...
Published on January 27, 2008 by Chris J. Sexton

versus
53 of 61 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Altering Kipling's prose?!
Just read the previous review (about 'simplifying' the

language in Jungle Book). I am reading the ORIGINAL

text JB to my eight year old son (for over a week now),

and he's not once indicated that the language puzzles

him. He did ask me why Mowgli uses thee and thou

and wouldst while talking with the animals, but...
Published on October 3, 2005 by Robert Walker-Smith


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183 of 198 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Real Thing, January 27, 2008
By 
Chris J. Sexton (Fillmore, California USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Hardcover)
My favorite books from childhood have always been Milne's "The World of Pooh" and Kipling's "The Jungle Book". Over the years I have purchased many copies of each as presents. Both can be difficult to find in versions unaltered from the original. I have found this to be particularly true in the case of The Jungle Book. Some folks just don't seem to get that Kipling had a pretty good handle on what he was doing. One does not tamper with a Masterpiece.

This version is the real thing. It reads word for word the same as the tattered, 40-year-old copy that I first read when I was eight years old. Add illustrations by Robert Ingpen that faithfully capture the emotion of the story and you have a real winner. For those who appreciate The Jungle Book as it was BEFORE it was adulterated by Mr. Disney and friends, this is a very worthy effort.
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32 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars only partially the real thing!, November 8, 2008
By 
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Hardcover)
This is undoubtedly a beautiful book, but it should definitely be noted that it only contains the first half of Mowgli's story (i.e., through Shere Khan chapter only) - the text seems unabridged that far, but parts of both Jungle Books are missing - which I for one was misled about from other review(s).
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46 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kipling's Masterful Storytelling, History, and Modern Mythology Come Together, September 14, 2009
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Kindle Edition)
Legends are made from legends. Rudyard Kipling dug deep into the tales of the jungle from his years living in India, and drew from them the kinds of stories that live forever.

"The Jungle Book" is more than how Mowgli, the man cub, learns to live and survive amongst enemies like Shere Khan. The intense mongoose vs cobra "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi," also well-known, is here, as are several lesser-known and unrelated adventures.

Richly written, with details and contexts unfamiliar to Western readers, "The Jungle Book" lifts imagination and language beautifully. Poetic, and written in a literary style, it shines above most modern prose.

This is the stuff of afternoon stories read to older boys and girls. Young teens will while away rainy evenings, unwilling to part until finished. Sometimes scary and always exciting, Kipling also uses the book to teach lessons much greater than a jungle in India.

When chapters were first read to me many years ago, I listened gawk-eyed, listening intently for as long as my mother would read. I read it with different eyes now, but no less a young boy as I worry how Baloo will handle the Bandar-Log monkeys.

It isn't perfect. A few scientific details are fudged (wolf pack breeding structure, for example), but nothing that matters in the big picture. Kipling will have you in the palm of his hand, even though it was first published over 100 years ago.

May "The Jungle Book" by Rudyard Kipling be as amazing to you as it has been to me.

--Brockeim
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another superior quality offering from Calla Editions, October 18, 2010
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I own several titles in the Calla Editions' series of books, i.e. East of the Sun and West of the Moon: Old Tales from the North (Calla Editions), Tales of Mystery and Imagination (Calla Editions), Stories from Hans Christian Andersen (Calla Editions), and The Knave of Hearts (Calla Editions). They are all of superior quality in terms of binding, paper, as well as illustrations. The book is larger than a regular hardcover, and this particular title "The Jungle Book" weighs about two pounds. This 2010 Calla edition is a republication of the edition originally published by Macmillan and Co. in 1908. The paper is of heavy stock, one can literally feel the heft of each page! The color of the paper is ivory (or something close to it), and it is bound in pearl linen. The font used is Kennerley Old Style and Michelangelo, and apart from decorative borders on the pages, the highlight of this book is the 16 color plates, some in two-page spreads by twin brother artists Edward and Maurice Detmold.

According to the information provided within the book, these illustrations are "reproduced from an extremely scarce, original portfolio of watercolors, and have never before appeared on this scale in book form." I believe it! They are truly beautiful and exquisite, and incredibly detailed, almost life-like. There is one illustration featuring an unclothed Mowgli standing alongside the Lone Wolf, and the rich earthy tones in the picture are brilliantly depicted. There's another illustration (two-page spread) titled The "Council Rock" which has a magnificent Bagheera and I swear the glint in his eye appears very real!The depiction of Kaa the Python is also stunning. These Calla Edition books are a treasure and a must-have for any collector.
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53 of 61 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Altering Kipling's prose?!, October 3, 2005
By 
Robert Walker-Smith (Oakland, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Just read the previous review (about 'simplifying' the

language in Jungle Book). I am reading the ORIGINAL

text JB to my eight year old son (for over a week now),

and he's not once indicated that the language puzzles

him. He did ask me why Mowgli uses thee and thou

and wouldst while talking with the animals, but

accepted my explanation without demur.

Reminds me of the lines from an Elinor Wylie poem

"Our mutable tongue is like the sea

Curled wave and shattering thunder-fit;

Dangle in strings of sand shall he

Who smooths the ripples out of it."

Say it out loud, and feel what it does to your

mouth and face - that's what Kipling's prose

does.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gorgeous heirloom edition of Kipling's timeless stories, April 17, 2011
I had an anthology as a child that contained Kipling's Rikki Tikki Tavi, which I must have been only eight or nine when I first read--and then re-read over and over. I had purchased one of Calla Editions' classics (Poe's Tales of Mystery and Imagination)to satisfy my impulse to revisit some of my other childhood reading, and when I saw this edition of Jungle Book among Calla's newer publications, I couldn't resist. I'm glad I didn't. Rikki didn't disappoint my memory of him(though the story seemed a lot shorter with the passage of years). What knocked me out are the incredible color plates by two Edwardian-era brothers--Edward and Maurice Detmold. A little Googling informed me that they'd worked together for a relatively short time before one committed suicide in his twenties; the other followed suit later on. What tragedies! The Detmolds' artistry is stunning. Mowgli is depicted as he always should have been--nude and without shame among his animal protectors, and Mowgli's antagonists--Sher Kan the tiger and Kaa the python are sinister in the Detmolds' potrayal of them. Calla has elected to run some of the color plates across two pages, which adds to their impact. Somebody at Calla must love the look of fine, old hardcover books, because they're making them available at prices within reach--and with the look and feel of the originals.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic for Children, Classic for Adults, Classic Influence on later writers, November 11, 2009
By 
T. S. (United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Kindle Edition)
This collection is probably the single best starting place for reading Kipling, especially for younger or teen readers (though the very youngest would probably enjoy his _Just So Stories_ more). These stories are great reads, enjoyable by all ages.

Fans of the movie will find a more complex work here -- not "darker," but more ambiguous; the three stories from this collection that have generally been adapted into other media, and that most readers think of when they think of "The Jungle Book", focus on outcast human infant, Mowgli, who is abandoned as an infant in the jungle and raised by wolves, and primarily tell the story of his search for a "place" within the wolf pack, the Jungle, and the human world, and his outsider status in all three realms. Perhaps because they focus almost entirely on the Indian jungle, or perhaps because they're aimed at children, these stories are also largely free of the undertone (overtone?) of imperialism that runs through much of Kipling's work for adults.

It has, of course, been massively influential on later writers, from Edgar Rice Burrough's _Tarzan_ to Neil Gaiman's _The Graveyard Book_. The various morals contained within the "Mowgli" stories were also taken as a motivational book within the Scouting movement (reading this helped me understand why I had to memorize "Akela" when I was a cub scout).

While only three stories in this collection focus on Mowgli, Kipling did write a second collection, "The Second Jungle Book," which is almost entirely comprised of Mowgli stories, and which I would highly recommend if you like these tales. If you want to read more of Kipling's work for adults, I'd recommend either "The Man Who Would be King" or the short story collection "Plain Tales from the Hills," both of which should be available for free online.

As to formatting of this kindle edition: there are blocks of Kipling's poetry in between the stories, some of which was difficult to read as the formatting had not carried over well to this Kindle edition. Not a critical issue, but Kipling's poetry is excellent and the formatting errors were annoying.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kipling for goodness sake! And better than a movie!, April 7, 2009
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Kindle Edition)
You will be sold on Kipling. And you may never settle for the movie afterwards; Jungle Book lives and breaths on its own.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I finally have my own copy, February 3, 2002
By 
Ravencatt (Portsmouth, OH USA) - See all my reviews
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I grew up reading and re-reading theses stories. I never found a compilation of the Mowgli stories I liked though, at least not an affordable one.
This one gave me not only Mowgli but Rikki-tikki-tavi. All with excellent illustrations that add but do not intrude on the stories.
This is a classic that should be on every bookshelf.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WELL BEYOND DISNEY, November 16, 2003
By A Customer
The Jungle Book
When we say "The Jungle Book" most of us invariably think of Disney's films, both animated and live action, that have become the norm for Rudyard Kipling's immortal children's stories. While the Disney interpretation is fun and enchanting, it makes a dramatic departure from the actual stories and takes considerable creative license in telling just a part of the Kipling stories. Even what we get from Disney falls considerably short of the applicable parts of Kipling's original that Disney used. What? Kaa, the snake, as Mowgli's friend and powerful ally? What? A deeper story of Mowgli's experience as a wolf and his relationships with Mother wolf and Father wolf? Oh yes, much, much more.
Kipling's original masterpiece also includes several other wonderful chapters about the continuing adventures of Mowgli and also adds the marvelous tale of "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi," the heroic mongoose whose battles with wicked cobras in an Indian garden easily matches Mowgli's showdowns with Shere Khan.
The book also includes the tale of "The White Seal." This short chapter of "The Jungle Book(s)" provides a wonderful commentary, in the form of animal parable, on human society, competition, male ego and human pride. Our hero, Kotick, the white seal, through his fearless explorations and his willingness to fight for a dream, changes the minds of his parents, his peers and his society for the better. The invitation to each of us is very clear to find and free the white seal that exists in all of us.
Don't get balled up in the notion that "The Jungle Book" is just for kids. A look beneath Kipling's wonderful prose reveals, like most great children's classics, that the author is using the unintimidating forum of children's literature to speak to kids of all ages with the hope that somehow we'll all finally get it.
Buy the book, read it, read it to the kids you know and learn the lesson.
Douglas McAllister
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The Jungle Book
The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
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