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The Justification of the Good: An Essay on Moral Philosophy Paperback – August 31, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. (August 31, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802828639
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802828637
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #721,803 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Vladimir Solovyov (1853–1900), one of Russia's leading intellectuals and a close friend of Fyodor Dostoyevsky, taught philosophy at Moscow University. Among his other books is "Three Conversations concerning War, Progress,and the End of History."

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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By ecclesial hypostasis on July 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
Solovyov builds in this book a moral philosophy based on a very insightful ontological premise. He situates humanity as a kind of mediating being, having our roots in biological nature below us, personal relationships with other people on our level, and aspirations to union with God above us. This translates into the primal moral emotions of shame, pity, and reverence, shared by all people. These lead to the moral imperatives of asceticism, generosity, and piety. He develops from this his fundamental moral principle that we should always seek the good of all beings to the fullest extent and at the appropriate level. Later in the book he links up with his theology of 'divine-humanity' to speak about the place of the church and the state, and the eschatological orientation of moral philosophy.

There is a very close affinity between Solovyov's reflections and Orthodox theology, so most Christians will find this a compelling analysis of morality. His influence on Dostoevsky is quite obvious - some of the characters of 'The Brothers Karamazov' are clearly designed to display Solovyov's analysis.

Like all thinkers, Solovyov had a tendency to short-sightedness in his historical predictions. His optimistic hope for a unified Christian Europe proceeding in unbroken social and political development into the 20th century takes on a very poignant aspect in light of the Soviet and Nazi regimes that came within a generation of his death. However, he would not have been surprised by these events given that they display all the characteristics of the collectivism that he critiques, and as a Christian he never ties the fulfilment of his hope to a particular historical manifestation anyway.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy D. Wallace on August 1, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is not a new translation, but it does have a foreword by the esteemed Orthodox theologian David Bentley Hart and extensive notes by the translator Boris Jakim (who has also translated works by Pavel Florensky and Sergius Bulgakov). The range of subjects studied by Solovyov in this book are numerous. He talks about shame, just war, and morality. A definite must-read for those interested in Modern Orthodox Theology or Russian Philosophy.
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