Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Sell Us Your Item
For up to a $0.25 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
City Cafe Add to Cart
$16.95  & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Anchor*Media Add to Cart
$19.89  & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Mike's DVDs and Blu Rays Add to Cart
$25.00  & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

The Karate Kid Collection (Four Film Set) (1994)

Ralph Macchio , Pat Morita , Christopher Cain , John G. Avildsen  |  PG |  DVD
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (170 customer reviews)

List Price: $30.99
Price: $17.15 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $13.84 (45%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Tuesday, Sept. 23? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Amazon.com "Think Inside The Box" Contest
Inspired by Boxtrolls releasing in theaters 9.26.2014, create your own Boxtroll costume for a chance to win $3,000 in Amazon.com Gift Cards. Learn more

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

The Karate Kid Collection (Four Film Set) + The Karate Kid
Price for both: $24.94

Buy the selected items together
  • The Karate Kid $7.79

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product Details

  • Actors: Ralph Macchio, Pat Morita, Hilary Swank, Elisabeth Shue, Martin Kove
  • Directors: Christopher Cain, John G. Avildsen
  • Writers: Mark Lee, Robert Mark Kamen
  • Producers: Bud S. Smith, Doug Seelig, Jerry Weintraub, Karen Trudy Rosenfelt
  • Format: Box set, Color, NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround), French (Unknown)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French, Thai, Korean
  • Dubbed: French
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 1 encoding (US and Canada only)
    PLEASE NOTE:
    Some Region 1 DVDs may contain Regional Coding Enhancement (RCE). Some, but not all, of our international customers have had problems playing these enhanced discs on what are called "region-free" DVD players. For more information on RCE, click .
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: February 1, 2005
  • Run Time: 455 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (170 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0006OBPTA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,478 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Karate Kid Collection (Four Film Set)" on IMDb

Special Features

"Beyond the Form" Featurette
Commentary with Director John G. Avildsen, Writer Robert Mark Kamen and Actors Ralph Macchio and Pat Morita
"East Meets West: A Composer's Notebook"
"Life of Bonsai" Featurette
"The Way of the Karate Kid" Multi-Part "Making of" Featurette

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

A sizable hit with both teen audiences and sports-themed movie enthusiasts, 1984's The Karate Kid had the right combination of heart and action to spawn three sequels of varying quality between 1986 and 1994; all four features have been packaged together in this three-disc set. Though plot elements varied from film to film, the core story (and the series' greatest strength) remained the same--the relationship between a wise Japanese martial arts teacher (skillfully underplayed by comedian Pat Morita) and his young American student (Ralph Macchio in the first three films, and future Oscar winner Hilary Swank in the final entry, The Next Karate Kid). The first of the Morita/Macchio matchups remains the best of the four features, with excellent performances from both leads and director John G. Avildsen (who also handled Rocky and the first two Kid sequels) expertly balancing the emotional moments with the pure excitement of the martial arts tournament that serves as its finale.

The subsequent sequels with Macchio seemed pulpier (especially The Karate Kid, Part II, with its rekindled wartime romance subplot), and the inevitable come-from-behind competitions lacking the impact of the original; 1994's The Next Karate Kid (directed by Christopher Cain) put a slight spin on the formula by replacing Macchio with belligerent teen Swank, but it too seems like a retread of the first film. Still, the messages inherent to each film--finding one's inner strength, trusting your heart--should ring true to new generations of younger viewers. Fans may find the Collection light on supplemental features--while all four films are presented in anamorphic widescreen format, only the original (which was previously released in pan-and-scan only) offers commentary by Avildsen, Macchio and Morita and several making-of featurettes; the three sequels, packed into two discs, offer no extras. --Paul Gaita

Product Description

The Karate Kid
A fatherless teenager faces his moment of truth in The Karate Kid. Daniel (Ralph Macchio) arrives in Los Angeles from the east coast and faces the difficult task of making new friends. However, he becomes the object of bullying by the Cobras, a menacing gang of karate students, when he strikes up a relationship with Ali (Elisabeth Shue), the Cobra leader's ex-girlfriend. Eager to fight back and impress his new girlfriend but afraid to confront the dangerous gang, Daniel asks his handyman Miyagi (Noriyuki 'Pat' Morita), whom he learns is a master of the martial arts, to teach him karate. Miyagi teaches Daniel that karate is a mastery over the self, mind, and body and that fighting is always the last answer to a problem. Under Miyagi's guidance, Daniel develops not only physical skills but also the faith and self-confidence to compete despite tremendous odds as he encounters the fight of his life in the exciting finale to this entertaining film.

The Karate Kid: Part II
The price of honor. The power of friendship. The Karate Kid, Part II. Ralph Macchio and Noriyuki "Pat" Morita re-create the roles that brought them international acclaim in The Karate Kid. Karate student, Daniel Larusso (Macchio), accompanies his wise and whimsical teacher, Mr. Miyagi (Morita), to his ancestral home in Okinawa. For the boy, it's a journey to an exotic new world offering new clues to his mentor's secret past. For Miyagi, it's an opportunity to see his father one last time and to rekindle a romance with his childhood sweetheart (Nobu McCarthy). But Miyagi's return also re-ignites a bitter feud with long-time enemy, Sato (Danny Kamekona) - a feud that involves young Daniel in a brilliant collision of cultures and combat. Now, far away from the tournaments, the cheering crowds and the safety of home, Daniel will face his greatest challenge ever when teacher becomes student and the price of honor is life itself.

The Karate Kid: Part III
Karate Kid, Daniel Larusso, risks losing it all when he places pride before principle in this dramatic film that reunites stars Ralph Macchio and Noriyuki "Pat" Morita. When Daniel (Macchio) decides not to compete in the upcoming karate championship, he becomes the target of vicious Cobra Kai student, Mike Barnes (Sean Kanan), who's determined to win the title back. Standing firm, Daniel's mentor and trainer, Mr. Miyagi (Morita), instructs him to ignore Mike's threats - and stay away from the tournament. But when Mike's relentless abuse escalates into blackmail, Daniel finds himself forced into competition - and at serious odds with Miyagi, the one person he cherishes most. Desperate, Daniel turns to another karate instructor, Terry Silver (Thomas Ian Griffith), whose violent combat techniques are directly opposed to Miyagi's wise instruction. But when Daniel realizes that Terry and Mike are allied with Mr Miyagi's old nemesis, Kreese (Martin Kove), in an elaborate set-up for revenge, he also knows he has alienated the only person who can help him. A riveting story of independence, inner strength and self-enlightenment, The Karate Kid, Part III is a powerful new chapter in this popular series of films.

The Next Karate Kid
Noriyuki "Pat" Morita and Acacemy Award winner Hilary Swank co-star in this story of a rebellious teen, Julie, who blossoms with a little help from her friends - in this case, the wise Mr. Miyagi and a trio of buddhist monks!

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
69 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well... the purchase is 5 stars. *edited* February 9, 2005
Format:DVD
Part I (5 stars): Funny, I'm just not a big "karate buff", in fact, this probably is the only set of movies like this I own, or may ever own. When I tell people this is one of my favorite movies *ever*, they laugh. Then they say, "Are you serious?" And my words to explain why always fall short. Beyond the karate, beyond the underdog nature, there lie two characters that seem to compliment each other so perfectly it really makes the movie what it is regardless of the subject matter. Something about the chemistry between Pat Morita and Ralph Macchio simply defies convention and thrives on it. The casting by all involved was surely just one part luck, one part fortune, the DVD extras merely icing. My only complaint is this not being mastered to 5.1 DD sound.

*edit* I watched the commentary last night and I must say I was disappointed. Pat Morita's input was intrusive, and many comments made by the group were simply uncalled for. When Elizabeth Shue would walk away from the camera they would comment about her rear end and totally ruined a part of my respect for them. They went on to ridicule an "extra" who became a greeter of some sort. They laughed and carried on through the whole thing. At the beginning I thought, well they are a lively group, but after 45 minutes it wore thin and I wished then I would have turned it off. There were a few bits here and there I learned, but what I really learned is why companies have the disclaimer at the beginning of the movies.

Part II (4 stars): I'm kind of ashamed of avoiding this movie now. As much as I loved the first I never bothered with the second. I've just never been fond of sequels. Be it Back to the Future Two, the Lost World, or the hundred other sub par sequels, they just seem to mar the original product.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An American Classic March 6, 2005
Format:DVD
While some critics dismiss "The Karate Kid" as a 1980s teen movie, I place it in the same category as such classics as "Star Wars", "Rocky" and "Jaws." It is a beautifully-written, -acted and -directed film that pulls at your heartstrings and makes you cheer. Pat Morita's Mr Miyagi (for which he received an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor) is one the archetypal characters in American film. His relationship with Ralph Maccio's Daniel LaRusso is as genuine and touching as any you will find in film. I remember seeing it in the theater when I was very young and the audience exploding into applause at the final "crane kick" scene. That does not happen very often.

The DVD of the entire series is now available (Part 2 is decent but Parts 3 and 4 are not). The best DVD feature is the making-of documentary. It's been 21-years since this film was in theaters and all the major contributors are still alive and in good spirits for the documentary. Everyone involved in the project sees this movie as the pinnacle of their careers (and I agree with them).

This is one of my favorite films. I give it my highest recommendation.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Prepare to ride the wave of nostalgia... February 3, 2005
By D.L.
Format:DVD
There are only a handful of movies that I associate with my youth while growing up in the 80's. "The Karate Kid" was definately one of them. By taking a seemingly cliched premise about the student being taught by the master to avenge his honor, the filmmakers were able to inject a lot of warmth, humor and heart into the movie to make it an entirely unforgettable film. Unfortunately, the sequels (as they rarely do) never lived up to the original with the fourth one (starring a young Hilary Swank) being a parody of itself. But rather than bore you with inane details as to what I loved and hated about each film, I will describe the special features, which is the only reason to put up with the last two sequels. A treat for "The Karate Kid" fans is a forty-five minute documentary on the filmmaking process from its origins to the final cut. It was great seeing Ralph Macchio, Pat Morita, Martin Kove (Kreese) and William Zabka (Johnny) as they are today, describing their experiences while making the film. Hearing Kove admit that his initial dislike for the director helped him to channel his character's anger was great. The "East Meets West: A Composer's Notebook" and "Life of Bonsai" featurette were basically fillers and only added trivial information about the film. However, I was a little disappointed that the same amount of features weren't found on "The Karate Kid, Part II," nor the other sequels, as bad as they were. But it's the first film that I hold close to my heart and with the great features and affordable price, the collection is well worth the price.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
37 of 50 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What a total rip off!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! February 9, 2005
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
Here I sit anxiously awaiting my boxed set, just busting at the seams at the opportunity to see KKI in widescreen. I am a huge KK fan ... I have the first one on Beta, VHS, and DVD. I also have the soundtrack on cassette and CD. I have the paperback book versions, some of the action figures, and the script. I love this film; I know this film. I just popped the DVD in and to my dismay I see that even though the box says remastered for HD, absolutely nothing was done to clean the film up. It has the same dust specks in it that the original DVD had in it. What's worse, this isn't even widescreen!!!!! The lowlifes simply cut off the top and bottom of the original and called it widescreen. I compared it to my original full screen and you are missing parts of the picture. I am very very disappointed and will be seeking to get my money back due to their false advertising.
Was this review helpful to you?

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category