The Karate Kid 2010 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(412) IMDb 6.2/10
Available in HD
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When 12-year-old Dre Parker's mother's latest career move has landed him in China he is left with no friends in a strange land. Dre has nowhere to turn but maintenance man Mr. Han, who is secretly a master of kung fu. As Han teaches Dre that kung fu is not about punches and parries, but maturity and calm, Dre realizes that facing down the bullies will be the fight of his life

Starring:
Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan
Runtime:
2 hours 21 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

The Karate Kid

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Product Details

Genres Sports, Drama, Action, Kids & Family
Director Harald Zwart
Starring Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan
Supporting actors Taraji P. Henson, Wenwen Han, Rongguang Yu, Zhensu Wu, Zhiheng Wang, Zhenwei Wang, Jared Minns, Shijia Lü, Yi Zhao, Bo Zhang, Luke Carberry, Cameron Hillman, Ghye Samuel Brown, Rocky Shi, Ji Wang, Harry Van Gorkum, Tess Du Cray, Xinhua Guo
Studio Columbia Pictures
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Jaden Smith and Jackie Chan do an amazing job in this movie!
Laura Galbraith
No, but The Karate Kid (2010) does have some really good moments, just like the original one does.
Tech Guy
My son loves this movie and watches it over and over and over all in one day.
Tameka Wilson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

114 of 135 people found the following review helpful By Chris Pandolfi on June 11, 2010
Format: DVD
"The Karate Kid" is very much a worthy counterpart to the 1984 film on which it's based, not only in terms of story, but also in terms of quality; the excitement, humor, warmth, and themes of friendship, maturity, and overcoming adversity have been left intact, and better still, there's no sense that any of it has been cheapened or simplified to the sake of appealing to a mass audience. The only exception, and I'm really just nitpicking here, is a glorious but contrived aerial shot of martial arts training directly on the Great Wall of China, the helicopter camera zooming around Jackie Chan and Jaden Smith as they pose dramatically. If there was ever an image that belonged in a Chinese tourism commercial, this would be it.

A more substantial criticism is that, because this is such a faithful remake, there isn't much it can do to surprise us. Anyone familiar with the 1984 film will know exactly how this new version will play out, from the main character's awkward arrival at the start to the climactic tournament at the end. There is a bit of an inconsistency; because it takes place in China, the featured martial art is kung fu, not karate, so the title is technically inaccurate. There's also the convenience of all the important characters being able to speak English, if not fluently, then just enough to get their point across. But it's all done so well that we may find ourselves suppressing the desire to look for flaws and make comparisons. What would be the point? Remake or not, this movie stands entirely on its own as a great entertainment, not just as a sports drama and a spectacle but also as a coming-of-age story, which is just as charming and insightful as it was twenty-six years ago.
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75 of 91 people found the following review helpful By Mary Kate on June 13, 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
When I read that there was going to be a remake of the 1984 film The Karate Kid, I smiled in fond recollection of the original (which was a great family favorite in our house) and was interested in seeing the new version because it was being shot in China - a country (and a culture) about which I feel I have a LOT to learn. I was looking forward to seeing it.

The results? A mixed bag. Since I generally prefer to judge a remake on its own merits and try to avoid making too many comparisons to the original, I was somewhat surprised that, after seeing Karate Kid 2010, ALL I was doing was making comparisons in my head - comparisons in which the new version kept coming up short. Annoyed with myself, I decided to watch the 1984 version again to make certain it wasn't just nostalgia that was coloring my opinion. So I re-watched. It wasn't just nostalgia - the original IS better.

The Karate Kid 1984 wasn't the best written or best acted film ever - or even of 1984. But it was very popular. Kids liked it. Their parents liked it. People saw it multiple times. They quoted from it ("wax on, wax off"). Some, including my own kids, still do. :-) Enrollment at karate schools across the country rose dramatically. What really came home to me during my back-to-back viewing of the two films is that the new version simply lacks much of the heart and most of the humor that formed the basis for that initial popularity. And both of those - the heart and the humor - came, IMO, from the wonderful relationship between Daniel LaRusso (Ralph Macchio) and Mr. Miyagi (Pat Morita). While the plot of the remake closely follows the original, the new film never comes close to capturing the essence of that relationship and so failed to engage me in the same manner the original did.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey C. Meade on January 8, 2011
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Karate Kid was a good movie overall, but left me still wondering why it was remade when it was over. The movie mostly matches the original in basic story even if the new version is in China.

On the good side, the technology of today makes some of the scenes more realistic, especially the fights, but it still felt like something was missing in this movie when compared to the old one, as if they thought using today's technology would somehow make a better movie which seems to be a normal problem with modern remakes.

Jaden Smith does a decent job with the role, but it felt like the character was a little too young. Maybe that's because I grew up watching Daniel Larusso who was supposed to be about 17 or 18 in the original. The love story is better in the new movie and was mostly a afterthought in the original, as was Jaden's relationship with his mother compared to Daniel's. The original movie focused mostly on the main plot, while the new movie attempted to branch off a bit to get a little more involved with other characters.

Jackie Chan does a pretty good job with the part, but, again, it just cant compete with Pat Morita as Mr. Miyagi. The boy who plays the antagonist in this movie does a good job of making you hate him, similar to the original.

The only part of the movie that seemed to defy reality a bit was the final fight scene. When Daniel Larusso did the crane technique in the original movie it was believable, but when Jaden Smith does the complete flip to kick the other kid down I was thinking no way. It just wasn't believable to me.

This movie is worth seeing, but fans of the original will still walk away with a slightly sour taste afterwards.
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