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The King and Dr. Nick: What Really Happened to Elvis and Me Hardcover – January 5, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (January 5, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595551719
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595551719
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (87 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #487,526 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

George C. Nichopoulos is the son of Greek immigrants. He earned his B.S. degree from the University of the South and then received his medical degree from Vanderbilt University Medical School in Nashville.  



Rose Clayton Phillips has written extensively about the recording industry and pop culture as a critic and correspondent for various music-oriented publications. She is co-author of Elvis by Those Who Knew Him Best.


More About the Author

George C. Nichopoulos is the son of Greek immigrants. After two years in the Army Medical Corp, he entered the University of the South, where he gained his B.S. degree. He completed postgraduate work on a Doctorate in Clinical Physiology at the University of Tennessee and then received his medical degree from Vanderbilt University Medical School in Nashville. In 1967 Nichopoulos gained entertainer Elvis Presley as a patient. After Presley died in 1977, the Tennessee Board of Medical Examiners charged Nichopoulos with over-prescribing controlled substances to Presley during the final months before his death. He was acquitted, but his license was suspended later on the same charges. He maintained a private practice from 1986 until 1995 when his medical license was revoked. His re-application for a medical license has been denied twice. Nichopoulos resides in Memphis with his wife Edna. They have 3 children and 4 grandchildren.

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Customer Reviews

It is an interesting and revealing read, well written as well.
Johann Gutenberg
After his death, each one may write what they think or want, and we will never, ever know who is telling the truth!!
Gloria B. Ferreira
The King and Dr. Nick is an excellent peek at the life and death of Elvis Presley.
Michelle Fruscione

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
His pager kept beeping and the third beep was the charm. Dr. Nichopoulos, "Dr. Nick" for short, quickly headed to the nearest phone to find out who was calling. It was Tuesday, August 16, 1977, a day that would be cemented in many minds. The panic that can only enter a voice when something is terribly wrong, met him on the other end of the line. "I think he had a heart attack," Joe Esposito called out to him. Dr. Nick was Elvis Presley's doctor and something was wrong, very wrong. An ambulance rushed to transport him to Baptist Memorial. It wasn't long before the world knew what happened at Graceland, but would they ever really know what happened? "Stop CPR. He's gone."

Dr. Francisco made the announcement that the "cause of death [was] cardiac arrhythmia due to undetermined heartbeat," but that wasn't enough. There had to be more, a hidden reason why the King was gone. That quest would ultimately fuel "a controversy that has never died." Vernon was heartbroken and wanted to know who had killed his son. The frenzy had only begun. The media began to circle like vultures. If there were answers, they would find them. Dr. Nick claimed he was cautious when he prescribed drugs, carefully placing them in small brown envelopes ready to be dispensed by Presley's nurse. An innocuous treatment plan and careful monitoring of a patient was commendable, but some people looked askance.

"I was saddened and hurt that Elvis's use of prescription drugs had been kept from me." Dr. Nick exclaimed. Dr. Eric Muirhead doubted that heart disease was the culprit. Someone had to be blamed for this death. The death certificate was signed by Dr.
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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Johann Gutenberg on January 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I strongly recommend to read Dr. Nichopoulos' account of the story and set aside what you have heard with regards to the "Elvis cover-up" so far. This book is not a plain whitewash as many Elvis admirers may expect.

Dr. Nick reveals very interesting background information about the relationship between the coroner's team led by Dr. Francisco and the pathologists at Baptist Memorial Hospital led by Dr. Muirhead. He thoroughly explains why the autopsy was private and how the toxicology reports were interpreted so differently by the parties. You get a very good idea what went wrong with the autopsy from the start, how Dr. Francisco annoyed the pathologists around Muirhead by not simply stating at the first press conference that they haven't found the cause of death yet but giving the media the information of "cardiac arrhythmia caused by undetermined heartbeat". This plus the following unprofessional behaviour of the pathologists who leaked information of the private autopsy to the press instead of being outspoken in the first place led in 1979 to "investigations" by journalists like Thompson, Cole and Geraldo Riviera who were everything but not educated in toxicology. But one thing they sure were - desperate to unveil a cover-up around Elvis Presley's death.

The outcome of these investigations were three lab reports, none of them convincingly stating that there had been a drug overdose or a polypharmacy case (two of the reports didn't even assume such a thing). If you compare Dr.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Nancy Famolari TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 5, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The King and Dr. Nick is divided into two fascinating parts. First, we get a glimpse of the strange life of a super star; then, we witness what the media can do to derail a private citizen's life.

Elvis Presley was a larger than life individual. This book leads us into Elvis's world and shows us the problems, both health and psychological, he dealt with on a daily basis. It doesn't take much imagination to realize the incredible strain of performing before thousands of people nightly, coupled with the necessary travel,would place on someone. It, also, doesn't take much imagination to see that a person under so much stress would turn to drugs to try to relieve some of the pressure. It's also true that someone with the ego necessary to perform the way Elvis did, and the money generated by those performances, would be a very difficult patient to control. Dr. Nick makes a good cases that he did the best he could.

The second half of the book presents the truly shocking witch hunt engaged in by ABC that finally led to a medical board review and even a criminal trial. It's almost unbelievable that the media could create such a stir and derail the life of a private citizen. If the medical board, or the attorney general, felt there was a criminal case against Dr. Nick, in my view, they should have pursued it immediately after Elvis's death, not several years later after being hounded by the media. This section is well worth reading as a cautionary tale for all of us.

Read the book then judge for yourself whether Dr. Nick was a victim or a criminal. Personally, I think he did the best he could, and that is all any of us can do.
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