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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Baker Book House Company; Third Printing edition (1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801024277
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801024276
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #570,901 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

D. A. Carson (PhD, University of Cambridge) is research professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois. He is the author or editor of more than forty books and is one of the leaders of The Gospel Coalition.

More About the Author

D. A. Carson (Ph.D., University of Cambridge) is research professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois. He is the author or coauthor of over 45 books, including the Gold Medallion Award-winning book The Gagging of God and An Introduction to the New Testament, and is general editor of Telling the Truth: Evangelizing Postmoderns and Worship by the Book. He has served as a pastor and is an active guest lecturer in church and academic settings around the world.

Customer Reviews

This book explains this well, is an easy read, and is worth the time.
Timothy Mills
Rather, he deals with the best arguments available in favor of the proposition that the KJV is the best (or only!)
Robert Frazier
All of these changes make these versions more like commentaries on the Bible rather than actual translations.
Gary F. Zeolla

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

120 of 129 people found the following review helpful By Brian Prucey on March 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
D. A. Carson's primary purpose in writing The King James Debate: A Plea for Realism is to refute those who advocate the superiority of the Greek textual tradition behind the King James Version of the Bible. As a consequence, his effort has produced a wonderful primer on textual criticism. The book is divided into two parts: Textual Question and Nontextual Questions. Carson makes every effort to treat the position of his opponents with respect although it is quite evident their position frustrates and even angers him.
The first six chapters are dedicated to surveying the different text-types and their historical traditions. He gives his readers a succinct overview of very complex issues regarding the rise of the four major textual traditions (Byzantine, Western, Alexandrian and Caesarean) and briefly discusses their strengths and weaknesses. Carson also navigates the thorny issue of how variations between these text-types developed.
Carson briefly discusses the origins of the Textus Receptus (TR) and makes the case that the TR is based upon the inferior and late Byzantine text-type. He traces the history of the TR through Erasmus's Greek Testament. He affirms that the KJV translators used the best manuscripts available to them at the time, but subsequent discoveries cast doubt upon the accuracy of the Byzantine text-type vis-à-vis the other traditions. In Chapter 7, Carson methodically summarizes the reasons why the TR is an inferior textual tradition.
Part Two deals with what Carson calls "Nontextual Issues." In actuality, this major division addresses Carson's thoughts on translating scripture. He deals with seven popular arguments some uses to support the superiority of the KJV translation over other modern English translations.
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74 of 93 people found the following review helpful By Robert Frazier on May 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
A response to a previous review:
"Mr. Carson does a good job of defending the modern versions."
Very true.
"Unfortunately, in order to do so, he must misrepresent the KJB only side and make it seem like Mr. Ruckman and Ms. Riplinger are actually representative of the KJB only position, which they are not."
Ruckman and Riplinger are NEVER mentioned in the book, nor are their writings.
"He ignores the scholarship of men like D. A. Waite, D. O. Fuller, Edward F. Hills, etc. to focus on two weirdos, Ruckman and Riplinger."
Carson didn't mention Waite, but he did deal with the theories of Fuller, Hills, Hodges, Ray and Pickering. Carson cannot honestly be accused of employing a straw-man argument. Thomas is either lying in saying he read the book, or lying about the book's contents.
"Of course, since Biblical preservation dictates the KJB only position, since the Textus Receptus is the vast majority text, it is necessary to distort the KJB only position to attack it."
Biblical preservation says nothing about the King James Version. The TR is not the Majority Text. It is never necessary to use a straw-man argument, on this topic or any other, and Carson does not do so. Rather, he deals with the best arguments available in favor of the proposition that the KJV is the best (or only!) Bible translation on earth, and he refutes them calmly and reasonably.
"However, if you want to defend the modern versions, this is as good as you'll get."
Unfortunately, if you are looking for honesty and sanity in KJV-Onlies, Thomas R.
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20 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
D.A. Carson's book, published in 1978, is a tremendous volume. However it has been surpassed by James White's KING JAMES ONLY CONTROVERSY published in 1995. Carson even endorses White's book. Buy both for a complete look at this convoluted subject.
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19 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Robert Frazier, rfrazier@integrityol.com on June 18, 1998
Format: Paperback
D.A. Carson tried to bring peace and sanity to the controversy that rages over the notion that the King James Version is the only translation of the Bible that is the Word of God. Since he wrote this short but masterful book, Dr. Peter Ruckman and Gail Riplinger have brought more war and insanity to the issue, and James White has added his excellent book, The King James Only Controversy, to try once again to settle the matter. If you or someone you know has been exposed to the KJV-Only virus, get both Carson's and White's books today!
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
The book was recommended by Walter Martin and I was not disappointed. Carson does an exellent job of reviewing the history of the Bible,and it's compilation. He explains the different manuscripts and how they are weighed together as the bases for some of the major translations. It appears to be a very level presentation in which to inform the reader and allow that person to then decide which version they would feel to be the best to use. He helps to point out that all of the major translations do not suffer in supporting all Christian doctrine.
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By Daniel Glover on April 10, 2014
Format: Paperback
I read this book in about two hours, maybe less. It's short. But if it were much longer I might have put it down. I just didn't think the writing was all that engaging and the content can all be found in White's book, The King James Only Controversy. Carson's was of course written first, and so is missing out on a ton of the more recent KJO advocates. Nevertheless, he interacts with the best of the best from the time of its publication (the 70s I believe). He spent a good deal of time discussing the Byzantine text type and why it is likely to be less reliable than many of the more newly discovered manuscripts we have today. But through the whole discussion on the various text types I kept thinking to myself that it's good I already knew much of what was being said because otherwise I might have difficulty grasping what he was getting at. I found it at a used book store being sold for like $2 and so bought it. For $2 I'd buy it again, but absolutely wouldn't spend $12-14 on it. If you get it at all, get it used. If you're looking for a good book on the topic, James White aforementioned work is much better and more in depth.
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