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220 of 225 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quiet Determination And Heroism
Published just before the opening of the movie of the same name, The King's Speech by Mark Logue and Peter Conradi is subtitled How One Man Saved The British Monarchy. That might seem on first glance to be typical publishing hyperbole, but after reading this fine biography most will agree that there's quite a bit of truth to it.

Lionel Logue was an Australian...
Published on November 24, 2010 by John D. Cofield

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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent,faithful reproduction of the film
I viewed the film in a theatre before purchasing the ;book, and after reading it found that the book was more discerning and explanatory regarding King's affliction and the man who helped him overcome it. Good book,well-written and filled with a good deal more detail than the film would permit. Thank you for making itavailable. Patricia 21
Published on February 2, 2011 by patricia 21


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220 of 225 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quiet Determination And Heroism, November 24, 2010
Published just before the opening of the movie of the same name, The King's Speech by Mark Logue and Peter Conradi is subtitled How One Man Saved The British Monarchy. That might seem on first glance to be typical publishing hyperbole, but after reading this fine biography most will agree that there's quite a bit of truth to it.

Lionel Logue was an Australian who moved to England during the 1920s. He was a pioneer in the teaching of elocution and as what we today call a speech therapist. His success brought him to the notice of the Royal Household, and he was soon requested to take on another patient: H.R.H. Prince Albert, Duke of York, second son of King George V.

Bertie, as the Royal Family called him, had a severe stammer that had begun during his spartan childhood and became worse as he grew up. Already outshown by his glamourous older brother the Prince of Wales, Bertie's speech difficulties caused him endless embarassment and hid his many fine qualities. Fortunately, Bertie had a wife who was determined to help her husband. Elizabeth, Duchess of York either introduced her husband to Logue or was otherwise instrumental in helping the two to connect. Over the next several years Logue met with his royal patient many times and eventually succeeded in helping the Duke gain more self confidence and speak more clearly.

Logue and Bertie's success came to be of national importance in December 1936 when King Edward VIII suddenly abdicated and left the throne to his younger brother. Now King George VI, Bertie was required to make many speeches both in person and over the air. He never completely mastered his stammer, but his improvement, fostered by Logue and by Queen Elizabeth, enabled him to speak fluently enough to satisfy all but the most severe critics. This was critical, because King George was to lead his nation and Empire through some of its darkest times of war and economic downturn.

Mark Logue is the grandson of Lionel Logue. This book is based in part on Lionel's diaries, and contains much new material on the King's speech problems and the therapies that alleviated them. It is very well written and illustrated and will be of interest to historians, those who deal with speech difficulties, and anyone who enjoys reading about determined, quietly heroic people.
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88 of 89 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting to see the differences between the book and the film (spoiler alert), January 15, 2011
By 
Jenny Allworthy (WATERLOO, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
Both the film and the book were wonderful. Having said that, the film is a wonderful story along with the kind of film crafting that will lift your heart. The book is very interesting and informative, but it is a non-fiction book, so you cannot expect the kind of entertainment that the film gives.
I thought it interesting that the filmmakers changed a few things (as they always do). Large things like (spoiler alert) that Bertie stopped his sessions with Logue because he was doing so well, not because they had a falling out. And small things like a joke between the brothers taken seriously in the movie makes one aware that Bertie and David were much closer to each other before the abdication, than the film would lead you to believe.
If you loved the film, but you would like the "real story" then you will love this book. And it really makes the relationship between Logue and Bertie seem even more amazing.
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59 of 61 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "How one Man Saved the Monarchy"..., November 28, 2010
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In lieu of being able to watch the movie "The King's Speech" because it hasn't been released yet, I ordered the book by the same name, written by Lionel Logue's grandson, Mark Logue, and his co-author, Peter Conradi. The book is a well-written biography of Australian-born speech therapist Lionel Logue and his work with Britain's Prince Albert when he was Duke of York in the 1920's and continuing on in the 1930's when "Bertie" became King - George VI - in 1936, and then afterward during WW2.

Albert, son of King George V and younger brother of Edward VIII, had developed a stammer during his youth, which made him shy and uncommunicative. As someone who has struggled all my life with a relatively mild stutter, I thought it was good that Mark Logue did not attribute the cause of Bertie's stammer to any one thing. Stuttering is an impediment which seems to arise from both/either physical and psychological reasons and most of the time cannot be properly ascribed to any one thing. In Bertie's case, it was possibly from a difficult youth. He and his siblings were not close to their parents - as was common in those days - and his parents seemed to rather scare him when they were together. A sadistic nanny and the changing of his left-handedness to right may have contributed to his stutter. In any case, he was a man who could not always control his own speech, and he was moving into some situations where he would be called on to speak publicly and to do so often.

After his marriage, Bertie consulted Lionel Logue who had emigrated to England from Australia with his wife and young family and set up a practice in speech therapy in London's Harley Street. After much practice, Bertie was able to give speeches, but he depended on Lionel Logue's continued help as he became king - first in peacetime and then in wartime. The many speeches by radio that George was called on to make in the 25 or so years of his rule were always difficult for him, but Logue's work made them bearable to the king. Logue and George VI became friends - of a sort - because of their work together.

Mark Logue and Peter Conradi were able to look through Lionel Logue's case files and put together a very good record of Logue's work with George VI. Whether Lionel Logue "saved the monarchy" is a bit in doubt, but he did give confidence and success to the George VI when he - and the nation and the Commonwealth - needed it the most.

A note to the authors - Wallis Simpson was from an old Baltimore, Maryland family, not a Pennsylvania one.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Seen the movie? Now read the book, February 9, 2011
By 
Mark (Washington State) - See all my reviews
I picked this book off a shelf while shopping at our local grocery store (sorry Amazon). After watching the movie (which is excellent) I wanted to know more about what really took place. I wasn't disappointed in that Mark Logue fills in many gaps that the film doesn't- as he should, having access to most of his grandfather's scrapbooks, letters and diaries. What I really liked about the book is that Logue and his co-writer keep as objective as they can and avoid the trap of making this a "what my grandfather did" type of book as it easily could have become- one forgets that the author is the grandson of the main character. Some drawbacks of the book are that it seems to have been rushed into print as there are several obvious "typos" that would have been eliminated with more time to make corrections to the manuscript. Another item that would have been nice is to bring out some more details of the actual treatment of the Duke/King- what Logue actually did to help him. We are treated to much of it in the movie, especially [SPOILER ALERT] the very humorous movie scene in which Logue has Bertie shout every cuss word he can come up with (how it got the "R" rating). I wanted to know if that really was one of Lionel's methods- but the book doesn't tell us. As some have said the book does slow down after the initial meetings of the two and once Bertie is coronated King George VI. However, in the author's defense, I'm not sure what else he could have done. It clearly wasn't meant to be a detailed biography of the King or even Logue himself, and perhaps it suffers some. My wife (who also read it) felt it got bogged down in history telling during the Second World War, but that too was probably unavoidable. All in all, however, I believe it is worth four stars and that you should read it if you want to know more about the REAL story- not the dramatized version in the movie.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Book --- Good Movie, March 5, 2011
By 
Anne Salazar "inveterate reader" (Huntington Beach, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I saw the movie before I knew there was a book; if I had known, I would have read the book first. But I really liked both and took no offense regarding the changes made in the film as I often do. The book, of course has a lot more detail and covers both men from birth to death. The film has taken liberties with the facts, as films almost always do. In "real life" Logue was a very sincere and respectful man, and very good looking. He was not at all "goofy" as he is portrayed in the movie. Considering the serious aspects of the situation these men find themselves in, the fact that each of them kept daily journals and wrote a lot of letters, all of which has been kept by Logue's family, makes it authentic and is a fascinating glimpse into the first half of the 20th century in Great Britain. Logue has written a very moving and fact-filled book.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars most excellent book, January 22, 2011
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purchased book after seeing the movie, as always some differences between the two but a very well written book and a very good read, love the details of his interactions with all of the Royal Family, the book covers a much longer period of his life of course and some very amusing anecdotes in the book
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The ideal companion to the movie....., January 26, 2011
By 
Logue's book serves as a wonderful companion piece to the movie The King's Speach. If one is unlucky enough to have not seen the movie, the book will certainly do the trick (although minus the lovely acting, music, sets and costumes). It rounds out the story with more information about Lionel Logue's family and the events that led to his introduction to The Duke of York, up until the King's and Logue's deaths. The book is written with a degree of accuracy and a very sweet sentimentality that could only come from a family member.

It's an enjoyable read for sure, whether you've seen the film or not.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Here's the real story, March 28, 2011
By 
Divascribe (San Antonio, TX) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
I read this book after seeing the movie, which is the reverse of what I usually do. Both were satisfying, but there are some differences. The book is less dramatic than the movie. Lionel Logue, the speech therapist, is more respectful of royalty in the book than he is in the movie. But the book fleshes out the characters, especially Logue and his family.

Most people know the basic story: Bertie becomes king in '30s after his brother abdicates to marry the woman he loves, American divorcee Wallis Simpson. Bertie is a reluctant king, not least because he has a bad stutter that makes giving public speeches torture for him.

As the movie and book both make clear, Bertie started taking speech lessons from Logue before becoming king and had made some progress by the time he was crowned. The book gives details of how Logue and his wife, Myrtle, are invited to sit in exclusive seating for the coronation. Still, the king struggled with his speech and worked with Logue for years afterward. His annual Christmas speech, delivered by radio, was a special trial for the king but a comfort to his subjects.

The movie ends with the king's fateful speech telling the British that the country was at war with Germany. The book follows both men to the end of their lives. Even though it's told in a matter-of-fact manner, parts of it are very moving. The co-author, Mark Logue, is Lionel's grandson. In June 2009, Mark Logue was asked by the film's producer to research family photos and archives so the film would be as accurate as possible. The eventual result was the book of the same name, complete with photos of Logue and his family, the royals and some correspondence between the king and Logue.

Several people have asked me why I read the book after seeing the movie. The answer is that the movie, while excellent, left me with a few questions, so I read the book to find out more. I was not disappointed. I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in history, and the important part that average people often play in it.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book is good as movie or better!, February 6, 2011
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I have seen the movie 10 times so i had to get the book. George the sixth has been one of my favorite kings of england for along time. When I read lat year that they were making the movie I nearly died. The book I like more because it gives the true timeline for the relationship between George the Sixth and Logue. They were as close as a commoner and King could given their stations in life. The book is also good because it gives you material that the movies does not. You see the real relationship and how it was built. Also you get to see the Logues marriage and the royal couples. They both were married a very long time and both wives were the people that helped define the men. So if you liked the movie you will like the book!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The right man at the right time..., March 14, 2011
This review is from: The King's Speech (Paperback)
With the success of the recent Academy Award-winning film, the story contained in this book has become much more widely known, a private portion of the life of the man who was King of the United Kingdom and head of the British dominions throughout the world during World War II, a time described by Churchill as both the darkest and finest of hours. This was not an unknown story, but one that was relegated to the background; like so many background elements, however, there is an aspect of this tale that makes us wonder what the world might have been like with even the slightest of changes.

It is rather well known that Hitler described Queen Elizabeth (later for half her life better known as the Queen Mother) as the most dangerous woman in Europe; less well known is the effort put forward by her husband, who was never meant to be King, to provide the right kind of symbol around which to rally in the dark times of the war. Edward, later the Duke of Windsor, had many faults, but ability to relate at ease in public was not a problem for him (cutting the right image, on the other hand, could be a problem). George, on the other hand, had a terrible stutter, and lived at a time when stuttering was much misunderstood, with many ineffective therapies touted and an inclination toward blame-the-victim mentalities that saw stuttering less as a disability and more as a personal fault.

Lionel Logue was not a doctor - he was someone who, however, had devoted much of his life to different aspects of public speaking, from working with shell-shocked veterans to recover speech abilities to small stints of amateur and professional acting on the stage. He traveled widely, from his original home in Australia to Europe, North America and Britain on a frequent if not regular basis. He eventually landed in London, and set up a practice on Harley Street (the well-known street for physicians and other therapists). It was from here that he came to the attention of the then-Duke and Duchess, later King George and Queen Elizabeth. His treatment was unorthodox for the time, but rather effective, and he maintained a consistent relationship with royal family after his initial treatments. Sometimes months or even years would go by without much contact, but at other times, work would be intensive.

The book goes further than the film (as most books will) at exploring the background of Logue and the royals; it also goes further than the film into the final days of both Logue and the King, both of whom passed away with a short time of each other, years after the war's end. The role of the monarchy had shifted dramatically from its ancient and medieval roots, and had become very dependent upon the presentation of a public face, and voice - Logue was instrumental in keeping this an acceptable one, given the advent of radio as a major vehicle for communication.

This book was put together by Mark Logue, grandson of Lionel Logue, and Peter Conradi, author and journalist. It is perhaps the combination of the personal and the journalistic that makes this book such a pleasant and quick read. When I'd purchased it, I had intended it for my weekly reading; I was done in just a few days. The style is engaging, and is supplemented by official texts and personal correspondence in a helpful but not overly oppressive manner.

This is an interesting piece, a great piece of history that goes beyond the headlines and major players, and shows how important the services of one person can be in shaping major events. Inspiring and memorable, this book is a great addition to the narrative history of the twentieth century.
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The King's Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy
The King's Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy by Mark Logue (Paperback - November 26, 2010)
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