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The Knights Templar of the Middle East: The Hidden History of the Islamic Origins of Freemasonry Hardcover – November 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 210 pages
  • Publisher: Weiser Books; 1St Edition edition (November 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 157863346X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1578633463
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,533,128 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

HRH Prince Michael is a Grand Master of the Order of the Knights Templar of St. Anthony and a Scottish Freemason. His first book, The Forgotten Monarchy of Scotland, was a bestseller in Scotland and the UK. In 1992, Prince Michael was elected president of the European Council of Princes. Recently named to the Diplomatic Corps of the Government of the Knights of Malta, he resides in the U.K.

Customer Reviews

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To make it short: The author is very selective in presenting the facts.
Sami B
Its last part should have read "the Islamic transmission of Freemasonry" instead of "origins".
xul
If a Knight Templar one had been present, English annalists would have recorded the fact.
Tom G. Mcdonnell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Tom on July 24, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This book is fairly well written and fairly well researched, with a good bibliography, except for the inclusion of some books of pseudo-history, but sadly lacking any footnotes or endnotes to indicate the sources of his claims, except for a few sources mentioned within the text, which in the end is a combination of history and pseudo-history, with little evidence of his title thesis about Islam, mostly just uncertain and vague connections between Templars and Islam in the middle east or Islamic Spain. The author briefly compares Islamic belief about Jesus against Church belief, but it seems unlikely that Islam is the source of heretical Templar beliefs, and continues a bit with speculations about Templar archaeological diggings and possible Essene manuscripts. The author spends some paragraphs comparing Islamic architecture and Church architecture, but unfortunately without any drawings or photographs, which would have been useful and helpful. The book is actually more concerned with the pseudo-historical idea that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were the founders of the royal families of Europe, including his own Scottish Stewart ancestry, and its links with the founding of freemasonry, and as usual with this sort of speculative alternative history, completely lacking any credible historical evidence of the most basic claim regarding their ancient reputed genealogy, but just continuing the usual unproven claims and speculations, as if merely repeating pseudo-historical assertions is sufficient proof. However, there was an assertion regarding the Merovingians and Carolingians and Capetians, as being all of the same family and same male lineage descent, that I have not seen in other similar pseudo-historical books, although I have not seen all the other similar books.Read more ›
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By xul on August 13, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This review is well intentioned to HRH and the co-author. However, the book simply does not meet minimal quality criteria for such a work and casts a thick shadow on Samuel Weiser publishers, otherwise known for high quality in the esoteric field. Perhaps authors and publisher were in a great commercial hurry to jump onto the Da Vinci Code bandwagon.

The subtitle is presumptuous. Its last part should have read "the Islamic transmission of Freemasonry" instead of "origins". As HRH should know, the origins of masonic craft symbolics and initiation are "from time immemorial".

The text to be printed was, if at all, very poorly proofread and abounds in errors of spelling, grammar and syntax. If proofreading quality is an indication of what HRH's rule might be like, God save Scotland!

Although it contains a list of reference texts, the book is not footnoted and thus places much if not most of its content, alas, into the realm of conjecture.

One of the central recurrent themes of HRH is continual severe bashing of the Christian Roman Catholic Church, an institution to which, mind you, this reviewer does not belong. This concurs with HRH's decidedly "kshatriya" (warrior caste) point of view. Not unlike the 19th century abuse and capture of French freemasonry by egalitarian politics, HRM purports that 18th century French FM served above all as a cover and camouflage to place the Stuart dynasty back on the throne of the United Kingdom. If this were so, so much the worser for the initiatic Order of FM!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Your time would be better spent giving oneself an enema than wasting brain cells on this book. After suffering through the author's endless attack on Christrianity, the reader finally gets to the subject of interest, the Templars. The limited discussion within the book on the sacred geometry, the working relationship between the Templars, Cisterian church and the stone masons building gothic churches would be good if any form of documentation or reference were included. But a Templar heavy cavalry charge at Bannockburn was to much. Any historian worth his oats knows the Scots launched a predawn surprise attack using infantry to win this victory. If a Knight Templar one had been present, English annalists would have recorded the fact. I ended up cataloging my copy of the book at the local landfill, no insult meant to the landfill.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bob Darvish on November 19, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is probably the most accurate account of how Freemasonry began in Europe and later formed the United States of America. After the Crusaders (Templars) attacked and killed Muslims, Jews and other Christians...just like the Mongols who did the same and later converted to Islam...learned the customs of Muslims (especially the Sufi and Shia branches...the Shriners heavy Shia influence is obvious and the use of the Quran in Freemasonry along with the Torah and Bible is the basis of all rituals) from the way they dress to the way they worship "The One True God". They took these new found ideas of Islamic Fatherhoood of God and Brotherhood of Man back to Europe with them only to be persecuted by the Trinitarian Catholic Church and disbanded. The survivors fled to Scotland where modern day Masonry continued and the rest history.
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