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The Know Circuit: The Bridge Chronicles, Book 2 Paperback – May 5, 2010


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The Know Circuit: The Bridge Chronicles, Book 2 + Under the Amoral Bridge: A Cyberpunk Novel (The Bridge Chronicles) + if [tribe] =: The Bridge Chronicles Book 3
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Product Details

  • Series: The Bridge Chronicles
  • Paperback: 162 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (May 5, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1452833222
  • ISBN-13: 978-1452833224
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,091,941 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Gary A. Ballard was born, raised and still resides in the state of Mississippi. He began writing at the age of 11, completing a number of really bad, thankfully unpublished novels during his teen years. Graduating from Belhaven College with a degree in Fine Arts, he has painted, photographed, drawn, and written the world as he sees it. Working as a web designer since the early days of the World Wide Web, Gary is well-versed in social media, graphic design and Internet marketing.His first novel in the Bridge Chronicles series, Under the Amoral Bridge, was published in 2009 and has received critical acclaim. He currently lives with his wife and three insane dogs, and updates his personal blog, The Game of Angst, found at gameangst.blogspot.com and The Bridge Chronicles Blog, found at amoralbridge.blogspot.com.

More About the Author

At the age of eleven, Mr. Ballard began creating his own fictional worlds and inhabiting those worlds with eccentric characters. As an artist, graphic designer, musician and author, he has spent decades enumerating a unique evolving vision of an absurd universe. His first four novels comprise a cyberpunk series called The Bridge Chronicles starring the amoral fixer of future Los Angeles, Artemis Bridge. The Bridge Chronicles in turn is one slice of cohesive universe that began as a pen-and-paper roleplaying game. Gary has recently begun a new series of novellas based on the Cthulhu Mythos made famous by H.P. Lovecraft called The Stepping Stone Cycle.

Mr. Ballard currently lives with my his wife and three dogs in Mississippi, where he continues to write, blog, compose music and play video games.

Customer Reviews

I didn't find this storyline to be as engaging as the first book.
C. Pedersen
It felt like a complete left-turn to me, narratively speaking, and made me feel like I was reading a different genre.
S. Olivares
Have read two of these series and loved them both....intend to to keep reading them!
EBN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. Rindal on August 4, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoyed the first novel in this series though parts seemed very underwritten. The characters were allmost all convincing.

This is not the case here. Bridge and companions head east from LA and when they get to Colorado the plot becomes in my opinion ridiculous for a science fiction novel.

It would totally work as a Fantasy novel but the author tries to use nultiple dimensions and particle physics to cover his drift of genres. But it is not acceptable.

His description of science and how science works is childish. And the characters Bridge meets in Colorado are cut out figures. It jars when Bridge who is so real talks to the egghead scientists. Do none of them have any grasp of realy or the consequences of their actions? They are just cartoonish for me.

The end of the novel is a rushed description (all telling, no showing) of a new world order. Couldn't this have been left for the next novel? His first novel seemed as if it was part well written and part synopsis. Again this time he has tacked an outline onto the end of his writing.

I wish the writer had bitten the bullet and made this a fantasy novel or taken the time to work out some vaguely "realistic" way to describe the science and its implications. Many other novels have force shields, iimpossible aliens, time travel and Quantam Mechanical doohickies and leave the details unsaid. And these books work because the writing carries the reader along and plots are internally coherent.

This author has a great imagination and reminds me in his wild supposings of Doc EE Smith or a modern space opera writer. He also mixes an interest in politics and corporatisation that is great.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. Olivares on August 1, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm going to have to depart from the other reviews and say that I didn't care for "The Know Circuit" very much, and I enjoyed "Under the Amoral Bridge" much more. I was looking forward to some more cyberpunk adventures with Bridge; instead, what I got was a dragon, wizards shooting lightning, and cars that turn into Autobots. The first novel was grounded in the cyberpunk genre, dealing with the underworld and corporate malfeasance. "The Know Circuit" is more grounded in "The Wheel of Time." It felt like a complete left-turn to me, narratively speaking, and made me feel like I was reading a different genre.

And the thing is, I don't think "The Know Circuit" is bad; it was written well and the characters were fine. I just felt like it took my expectations from the first book, wadded them up into a crumpled ball, and threw them into the garbage.

There are some highlights in the book, what with Stonewall and Aristotle being around and Bridge's usual charm -- I enjoyed the part were he was looting from potentially dead people. That being said, it wasn't enough to save the book for me. I kept on reading and persevering in the hopes the crazy would eventually subside, but it only became more and more pronounced, with the ending having a pretty fantastical change to the world established in the series. Unfortunately, "The Know Circuit" made me lose all my interest I had in the series -- I have other books to read in the fantasy genre, and I came to The Bridge Chronicles for some cyberpunk.

That's just how I felt, and is obviously just my opinion. If you read "The Know Circuit" and enjoyed it, more power to you. Any potential readers wanting to check out "The Know Circuit," though, just be prepared for a change of pace.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Bower on January 2, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Bridge is a fixer - an amoral connector of people and desires living in a near future America that has gone to the companies. With tax collection, policing and other operations outsourced by the government to private corporations, democracy is dead and enterprise requires a body guard.
This shortish story of Bridge's relationships, business and work to survive draws you in and leaves you wanting more.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Heckler on March 4, 2011
Format: Paperback
The Know Circuit, the follow-up to Gary A. Ballard's first novel of The Bridge Chronicles, Under the Amoral Bridge, is pretty much everything that it's predecessor was. It has a breakneck pace, with consistent action and interest; it isn't one of those novels that takes 500 pages to amble along where it's going, with tons of tangents and tidbits apropos of nothing. It has a familiar noir-ish twinge that is present in quite a lot of cyberpunk, but steps outside of the box a little more.

I thought Under the Amoral Bridge was essentially a straight thriller with a cyberpunk aesthetic; it was a welcome addition, but the story probably could have existed at it's core without the tech. In The Know Circuit, the story is really firmly entrenched in that cyberpunk feel, and the technology is important in making the story move. It is far from generic in that sense, however, as it isn't the standard paint by numbers gritty detective story that fills the genre.

Under the Amoral Bridge took a while to get rolling, but The Know Circuit is immediately interesting. While Bridge, the protagonist of the series, is at a club shortly after meeting with a prospective client, everyone in the building who has a cyber implant (for jacking into cyberspace) is suddenly indisposed by something unknown assaulting their minds through the implant. Shortly thereafter, Bridge and his bodyguard, Aristotle, learn of a giant dome suddenly appearing over Denver, and some kind of explosion wreaking havoc on the area. Aristotle has concern for his grandmother who lives in the area, and Bridge, owing Aristotle a favor, agrees to help him in his journey to figure out what exactly is going on in Colorado.

The Know Circuit is written better than Under the Amoral Bridge.
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