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The Koehler Method of Dog Training Hardcover – July, 1996


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 190 pages
  • Publisher: Howell Book House (July 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0876055773
  • ISBN-13: 978-0876055779
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.5 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (247 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #336,886 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 82 people found the following review helpful By Matt on June 12, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This is a very easy to follow, effective book for training dogs. This is NOT a book for owners with dog problems (or dogs with owner problems). If you just want to train your dog by using proven, conditioning techniques, then this is the book for you.

In a nutshell, this book teaches you how to ensure that your dog is paying attention to you at all times, and either obeys your commands, or suffers the consequences of his actions. This is NOT punishment. The dog decides. The dog learns. The dog obeys because he decides to obey. This not only gives him self-confidence, but also gives him a feeling of security because he knows he is doing the right thing. Dogs crave this. They WANT to please you.

Basically, you start with a long leash and a choke collar. You start walking in one direction. Of course, your dog will bound off ahead of you. At that point, you reverse direction, and walk the other way. The dog learns pretty quickly that he better keep an eye on you if he wants to keep from getting jerked around.

It goes on from there, and the lead gets shorter and shorter. The dog learns to HEAL, SIT, STAY etc., but basically you are conditioning the dog to think he is on lead all the time, and has NO choice but to obey or come when called, and, he is always paying attention to you. This is KEY!

If your Jack Russell sees a rabbit running across the road in front of an oncoming car, do you think he will come if you have a treat in your hand? Is he going to look both ways before crossing? No way. But if he has been conditioned to think that if he doesn't come, you'll just jerk his chain, he won't hesitate. He'll stop in his tracks, turn, run back to you, run right around behind you, and sit down right beside you... No kidding.
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140 of 159 people found the following review helpful By Afan of Sitagyl Manor on June 7, 2000
Format: Hardcover
No training method works for all dogs, but the Koehler method comes close. I read this book thoroughly before using it to train my dog, an American Pit Bull Terrier. I recommend it on the basis of the results I achieved with my own dog. My Pit Bull is a happy, calm, sweet animal who is well behaved and trustworthy even in crowded, distracting public places. Please note the notarized statement in this book attesting to the author's success in training thousands of dogs. A well-trained dog is a joyful companion and something to be proud of. As for the "brutality" ascribed to this training method by its detractors, I "corrected" my dog with the choke collar only three or four times - always for something potentially dangerous (with a big and strong dog like a pit bull) such as running wildly on the long training lead. Most of the time, during the routine exercises, the dog corrects himself. Essentially he is given a choice between discomfort and comfort. If he makes the right choice he avoids discomfort. This does not assume the dog is human - it respects the dog's intelligence and ability to make choices. This book helps you to train a dog to be obedient off leash under highly distracting conditions. I knew my pit bull had graduated the day I was allowing her to run around on a 30' lead and another, loose pit bull appeared out of nowhere. This animal ran up on my dog, she surged after it, and the worn lead parted company with her collar! I called my dog to me, and she came and stood in front of me. I told her to sit, and she did so, allowing me to tie the broken ends of the leash together - with this maniac nuisance dog running circles around us all the while.Read more ›
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114 of 130 people found the following review helpful By A reader on May 12, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Let's be straight -- Bill Koehler loved dogs. In fact, he loved and respected dogs a whole lot more than some of today's "big name" trainers who refer to dogs as stupid creatures, incapable of thought or responsibility, only able and willing to work for a cookie, because they are nothing but selfish "lemon brains."

I am a professional dog trainer who came up through the ranks of the "positive reinforcement" school of training. I was taught to use cookies and praise to get dogs to behave. And most of all, NEVER correct a dog -- that's cruel and outdated. Well, the "all positive" method of training does work -- to a point. But I found, time and time again, that only using positive reinforcement did not create reliable, 100% consistent behaviours. Where this was most obvious was on the recall -- let's say your dog is off leash at the park, and he takes off after a squirrel. And you're going to try to call him back and give him a tidbit? Most dogs would just keep on running. And to my mind, as a professional trainer, that was unethical and immoral, to send my clients out into the world, knowing full-well that their dogs were not safe, because their behaviours were not reliable.

The Koehler method makes commands reliable. And it does so without abuse, fear, or beating. Bill Koehler belived that it was far kinder to a dog to respect the dog's intelligence, to show the dog the clear contrast in consequences that occur when choosing between one course of action (say, heeling) over another (not heeling, and receiving a SINGLE forceful, well-timed correction). Correct the dog once, properly, the first time, and let the dog make his own choices after that. In fact, Koehler believed it was completely CRUEL to a dog to consistently nag it, over and over again.
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