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The Korea Asylum Paperback – July 10, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (July 10, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1478197137
  • ISBN-13: 978-1478197133
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 5.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,589,087 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 6 customer reviews
He does have enthusiasm and a sense of adventure.
Hiram O
They obviously did not know he was coming though, because it was too small for him.
Talos IV
Every single page on my Kindle had at least one, if not up to five mistakes.
Aimee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Talos IV on July 29, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Almost immediately I began to cringe at the Ugly American attitude of the author, who takes what is apparently first job ever, or actual exertion of any kind, I suspect, and accepts a teaching position in South Korea.

He turned out not to be American, so I was able to gleefully read on. He is given a 3 bedroom apt. owned by a relative of his employer FOR FREE. They obviously did not know he was coming though, because it was too small for him. Since he spends every nonworking waking hour drinking to intoxication, I'm wasn't sure how this was a problem for him. (Once, his supervisor's supervisor even sternly points at his 2 day old beard growth, and he doesn't grasp that it's generally not a good idea to show up reeking of alcohol and hung over to teach small children on a regular basis). He complains about evvvvvverything. Seriously, he never stops, the whole book. His employer kindly brings him a soft drink, at her expense, but it is too small, ugh. He has to work more than 30 hours a week, how awful (must have interfered with his drinking).

He signed up to teach English classes but is insulted when the supervisor sits in on the first day of class and has to correct his spelling on the board of the word, "Wednesday." Seriously, he didn't know how to spell Wednesday. At every job he belligerently ignores native Korean teachers with 20 plus years of experience. He knows best.

He never once has a kind work for any female in the entire book. Young women are dismissed as not attractive enough for his taste (note that every one of them immediately told him they had a boyfriend in another city. This means they only wanted to be friends with you hon). Every woman over age 22 is described as middle-aged, and too loquacious (I'm thinking he wanted to do all the talking and impart his 21 year old wisdom).

If you don't mind watching a swooshbag act like himself, this book is for you.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Hiram O on September 5, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is about a young New Zealand man's encounter with the East. (And, yes, New Zealand is "east" relative to America, but is philosophically Western.) He just graduated with a major in Television, and is taking a job as an English instructor in a private school in South Korea. He has no experience in teaching, nor can he speak Korean. He does have enthusiasm and a sense of adventure.

He tries to immerse himself in the culture, eventually learning passable Korean and earning a black belt in Korean martial arts. What he learns is that Koreans and New Zealanders (i.e. Westerners) interpret the world differently. There are many many occasions where he and they misunderstand each other, and he chronicles these occasions on both sides. He does not spend all of his time drunk. Nor does he spend it all complaining. He describes experiences from his point of view, though I can see that this might be interpreted as constant complaining by someone who has never tried to exist in a foreign culture. Nor is his behavior that of an "Ugly American"--someone who is quick to misjudge and misinterpret the behavior of others in a negative manner, and to speak rudely of them.

As Rudyard Kipling once said, "East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet." However, as the author concluded, "...I came to understand how completely naive I was to think that my world was the only kind that existed. Somewhere in the middle, both worlds could find common ground. It just took me a really long time to accept that...." Amen.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ron Wiles on December 20, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The book described life of a New Zelander just out of college teaching Korean children of different ages.
It gave an insight into the unfair business practices of two schools - asking for unpaid overtime, for example.
In all, the author was taken advantage of by the school administrators, but he appreciated the experience.
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