Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Audible Sample
Playing...
Loading...
Paused

The Kronos Interference Audible – Unabridged

4.1 out of 5 stars 89 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Audible, Unabridged
"Please retry"
$0.00
Free with your Audible trial

Read & Listen

Switch between reading the Kindle book & listening on the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice.
Get the Audible audiobook for the reduced price of $1.99 after you buy the Kindle book.
Free with Audible trial
$0.00
Buy with 1-Click
$15.95

Sold and delivered by Audible, an Amazon company


Product Details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
If you could travel back in time and change one single, horrible event in history that could redeem the tarnished name of humankind by preventing tens of millions of deaths, what would it be? Jake thinks he knows because the universe seems to be pushing him toward it. First, he receives his grandfather's journal in the mail, and then he receives a call from the CIA that they've found a technologically advanced vessel underwater that might possibly be a time travel machine. And, when he arrives to investigate the strange underwater curiosity, everything seems to point toward a plan for him to help his grandfather ... you guessed it ... kill Hitler. And, in the process, he'd hopefully also save family members and better his own life and humanity as a result.

Yes, it's been done before. Everybody wants to travel back in time to kill Hitler. But, honestly, what other action could you take in the past that would positively affect so many people ... other than perhaps eradicating mosquitoes which I read are responsible for about half of all deaths in human history. And, let's face it, a fumigation time travel novel just wouldn't be as interesting. Hitler (not mosquitoes after all) stands for what is still the worst part of humanity: the ability of people to look the other way or to even act like monsters in the name of fear. This is a problem that is still alive and well today (the current Sandusky scandal as case in point). So if there's anything that would prove to an advanced civilization spying on humanity that we're not a fellow advanced civilization and that there is still the potential for humanity to commit great atrocities, it would be the horrors of World War II that would make the case against us.
Read more ›
Comment 11 of 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I picked this up at the recommendation of one of the author's co-workers, whom I know. I'm an avid reader of all kinds of fiction, including science fiction.

First, the good:

It's a brisk read. The (initial) story line will draw you in, with a mysterious machine discovered at the depths of the ocean and indications of time travel. Character development is good, which is an unexpectedly pleasant treat in a first novel. It does flow fairly well; again, that's something one doesn't always expect in an early novel. Some of the alternate history threads were well-thought-out, and I actually would have enjoyed more depth to them. I found the main character believable and sympathetic; I was definitely rooting for him all the way.

Now, the bad. There may be some mild spoiler-like events, but nothing overt:

Time travel is tough, and this novel demonstrates exactly why it's so hard to do it well. The authors, frankly, do not. Their attempt to address some of the intricacies are, simply, to avoid them. That can kind of work when the rest of the story is pretty compelling, but here it just makes the treatment that much more superficial. I do appreciate that they tackle the old "the first thing anyone who got a hold of time travel would do is go back and kill Hitler" sci-fi/time-travel conundrum.

The overall story, especially once you've digested the ending, really seems like they started with an end concept + "kill Hitler" and worked to fill in the holes. That's fine, but at times it lead to an unusual mix of complete predictability (and I'm one of those types who does NOT try to figure out where stories are going), as well as lots of plot holes and inconsistencies. Why, exactly, are these super-beings doing any of this?
Read more ›
Comment 9 of 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've read LOTS of time traveling yarns. This one recaptured a jaded science fiction fan's interest. Give it a try.
Comment 6 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really wanted to like this book. It had a good set up, and the first third was decently written. It was like the author had a good idea, then just rushed through the motions. Granted, it's hard to find a time travel scenario that hasn't been done several times in the past (get it?) but this one, although a nice effort, was simply dirivative. I kept seeing scenes from the Twilight Zone, or Sphere, or Fringe...

I finished it, but was disapointed. I hope the author keeps at it, all they need is some practice in the craft.
Comment 4 of 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Jacob Newman is ready to return home to his ailing wife and family. He is approached by two men that slip him something that appears to be his grandfather's journal and a photo taken of his grandparents taken in the 1920's. He is called in by the government agency to look at something they found. Seems to be an alien artifact about three times the size of Yankee Stadium. Jacob is reluctant because his wife is so sick and he wants to see her. His boss Malcom tells him that it is a national security emergency and he needs to go to Chile, where he will be transported to the artifact.

He reluctantly goes and the artifact is a type of underwater floating vessel with eight floating screens inside. Each screen seems to be a window into a "violent" event of Earth's past. Jacob and Malcom theorize that the Earth may be on the verge of being judged by an alien race for all its violence.

Also in the vessel is a weird device that they call the Kronos device. While experimenting with the device, Jacob is transported briefly back in time to the Dachau Concentration camp and sees his grandmother dead. After this vision he reads in his grandfather's journal that he had a chance to kill Hitler in 1924 and failed to follow through. Jacob takes all of this as a sign, that is, if he can go back and help his grandfather actually kill Hitler he will save his grandmother and the mass killing of millions and somehow "please" the aliens who "may" be judging the human race.

Malcom warns him that he should not mess with the past because doing so could have catastrophic effects on the present. Of course Jacob doesn't listen and uses the Kronos device to go back and make sure the deed his grandfather failed to do, is carried out.
Read more ›
Comment 3 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews