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The Lady [Blu-ray]


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$21.53 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


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The Lady [Blu-ray] + The Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec [Director's Cut] (BluRay/DVD/Digital Copy) [Blu-ray]
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Product Details

  • Actors: Michelle Yeoh, David Thewlis, Jonathan Raggett, Jonathan Woodhouse, Susan Wooldridge
  • Directors: Luc Besson
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Cohen Media Group
  • DVD Release Date: October 2, 2012
  • Run Time: 128 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B008I34Y2Q
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #206,332 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

While Aung San Suu Kyi becomes the core of Burma's democracy movement the relationship she shares with her husband struggles to endure against a background of political turmoil and sacrifice.

Customer Reviews

A very emotionally told story, very well acted, and from a very good Director and Cinematographer.
Peter Sensor
This film was a beautiful depiction of the rightful leader of Burma, and yet a sad tale of the corruption that is still taking place in that ravaged country.
Jeffery C. Schlitzkus
The director Luc Besson created a film that depicted the true essence and beauty of Aung San Suu Kyi.
Sharon L. Strickland

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray
The story of Burma's Aung San Suu Kyi has surely got to be one of the most compelling, fascinating, and inspirational tales of fortitude and commitment in the arena of international politics. Winning the Nobel Peace Prize for her struggles to bring democracy to her war-torn land, Suu Kyi gave up everything (including family and freedom) for a cause and a country. It is an epic ongoing tale, one that would surely make an incredible film. Luc Besson, perhaps best known for his flair for stylistic action, takes on "The Lady" and it is a real change-of-pace from his usual fare. The wisest decision that Besson made was casting Michelle Yeoh in the leading role. She brings a tremendous dignity to the proceedings and her calm AND gravitas make her quite believable as Burma's national heroine. "The Lady" doesn't play as a straight-up biography, though. The focus of the film is Suu Kyi's family. I think this is an interesting idea to explore, but also one that I didn't think truly worked. By splitting the plot lines, we end up gaining very little insight into Suu Kyi or the political climate of Burma. If you aren't intimately familiar with the story, you might question why Suu Kyi is so passionate to the cause and just what her specific contributions are.

The movie begins with a bit of back story. We see Suu Kyi's father (a hero of the independence movement) murdered as Burma is presented as a land ruled by force. We then fast forward to Suu Kyi playing the role of an average British housewife. She has a perfect family, her husband (David Thewlis) is an Oxford professor and her two teenage boys are vaguely interchangeable. When her mother back home in Burma becomes ill, she returns to her homeland. Due to her heritage, she is held up as a prominent face for reform.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Tsuyoshi on August 24, 2012
Format: DVD
"The Lady," a biographical picture of Aung San Suu Kyi, is directed by Luc Besson, best known for his "La Femme Nikita," "Léon: The Professional" and "The Fifth Element." Michelle Yeoh plays the role of Aung San Suu Kyi, Burmese political and human rights activist. David Thewlis is her husband Dr. Michael Aris. (Thewlis also plays his twin brother Anthony.)

"The Lady" starts in 1947. General Aung San was assassinated when his daughter Aung San Suu Kyi was only two years old. About forty years later, Aung San Suu Kyi, now living in Oxford with her husband and two sons, receives a call from Burma. Her mother is ill and in hospital. Aung San Suu Kyi flies back to Burma, where, witnessing the student protests and the bloody suppression of it, she decides to stay and become a leader of the movement for democracy.

Yes, it's Luc Besson and his usual collaborators cinematographer Thierry Arbogast and composer Eric Serra. Unlike in most of his films (including his recent "Arthur" trilogy), his new film is not about a fantastical universe or underworld based on his wild imagination, but about a real-life person who is alive and in the middle of her political career. Actually, Besson made a "bio-pic" once, but I don't think historical accuracy was priority No.1 in making "The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc" for him.

While following her life as a political activist in Burma, Besson also tries to tell us a story of her relationship with her husband Michael Aris. In this way we get to see both her public and private face but despite the film's touching finale, "The Lady" suffers from its uneven pace that sometimes feels rushed.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Nathanael Greene on August 13, 2012
Format: DVD
This film's great merit is its incredibly inspirational subject, a biography of the luminous, internationally acclaimed democracy and peoples' rights activist, and Noble Peace Prize laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi. This film's deserving subject rates its four star rating.

Like much of the world, I am a long-time admirer of Aung San Suu Kyi. I became familiar with this incredibly inspirational woman from just reading news articles about her in THE WASHINGTON POST. This film admirably fleshes out these biographical details, into an extremely compelling story about her late-life activist endeavors on behalf of the "Burmese" people, a role she did not seek.

Aung San Suu Kyi's petite physical attractiveness and captivating yet disarming personal presence, suitably complements her humanistic character. The actress Michelle Yeoh is something of an Aung San Suu Kyi look-alike, and is well-cast to portray the attributes and accomplishments of Aung San Suu Kyi.

Maybe I love Aung San Suu Kyi because she always wears flowers in her hair - always. Remember the famous song lyric from the 1960s, "Be sure to wear flowers in your hair!"

I was fortunate to view this film shortly before Aung San Suu Kyi made her triumphal visit to Europe in the summer of 2012, in part to receive a long delayed bestowal of her Nobel Peace Prize, and to hear parts of her acceptance speech.

Aung San Suu Kyi's triumphal tour of Europe also physically exhausted her - there was simply not enough of this petite and forcibly secluded woman to satisfy the overwhelming emotional embrace and demands of many people, and many countries, who all seemed to want her for themselves. She even had the extremely rare honor of, I believe, a private citizen addressing the Parliament of the UK.
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