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The Lady in Blue Hardcover – June 19, 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Atria Books; 1st Atria Books Hardcover Ed edition (June 19, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416532234
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416532231
  • Product Dimensions: 1.1 x 6.5 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,221,677 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Destiny propels an agnostic journalist to rediscover his faith in this intriguing paranormal puzzler about a mysterious bilocating lady in blue from bestseller Sierra (The Secret Supper). In 1629, Sister María Jesús de Ágreda appeared more than 500 times to the Jumano Indians of New Mexico and converted them to Christianity—without ever leaving her monastery in Spain. (The Inquisition suspected her of witchcraft.) In 1991, Spanish journalist Carlos Albert interviews Giuseppe Baldi, a Benedictine priest and musicologist about his 1972 Chronovision machine reported to recapture sounds as well as images from the past. (The Vatican censured Baldi.) Albert later stumbles on Ágreda's monastery in Spain, while in Los Angeles, Jennifer Narody, a former U.S. intelligence agent working on a secret project for the Vatican, deals with unusual dreams and receives a startling stolen religious text. Sierra's heady tale about a true flying nun should entertain Christian paranormal buffs, though some readers might have welcomed more about that Chronovision time machine. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

The Spanish novelist follows up his reimagining of da Vinci's most famous painting in The Secret Supper (2006) with this curious exploration of the legend of the Lady in Blue, a seventeenth-century nun who, while in a trance state, would (or so the story goes) appear to people far away. (It's called bilocation—being in two places at the same time.) The novel focuses on a modern-day Spanish reporter, who, while investigating a story involving the shroud of Turin, discovers a convent founded centuries ago by the Lady in Blue. Intrigued by the legend and determined to find out the truth behind it, the reporter follows the trail to the U.S., where a woman with unique gifts might hold the answers to his questions. At once a paranormal thriller and an exploration of an enduring religious enigma, the novel is intellectually engaging and elegantly written. Fans of Sierra's previous novel should definitely read this one. Pitt, David

More About the Author

Javier Sierra, whose works have been translated into thirty-five languages, is the author of The Lady in Blue and the New York Times bestseller The Secret Supper. His newest novel is The Lost Angel, a breathtaking thriller that explores mankind's eternal quest to discover the truth of our origins -and of our destiny.
A native of Teruel, Spain, Sierra currently lives in Madrid.
Please visit www.javiersierra.com and www.thelostangelbook.com.



Customer Reviews

Well, this book did not last pass the 100 page test!!!
LENNY
For those readers who love historical detail and accuracy in description, this is definitely a fascinating book that will hold their interest.
Juan Gomez-Jurado
And on the surface, there seems to be a number of subplots that are not resolved.
Barton J. Chandler

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Juan Gomez-Jurado on June 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Javier Sierra, New York Times bestselling author with "The secret supper" comes again with a story about Sister María Jesús de Ágreda, who appeared more than 500 times to the Jumano Indians of New Mexico and converted them to Christianity--without ever leaving her monastery in Spain. (The Inquisition suspected her of witchcraft.)

This character driven thriller hurls itself into the reader's consciousness at break-neck speed, and before the reader realizes it, the book holds the reader in its thrall: hook, line, and sinker. For those readers who love historical detail and accuracy in description, this is definitely a fascinating book that will hold their interest. The book is written in clear, effortless prose, which makes the 'hardest' sci-fi details surprisingly easy to understand.

'The Lady in Blue' delivers everything a reader would want in a thriller - and more. Perfect for vacation or weekend reading, this 352 page novel will keep readers entertained from start to finish.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Cameron-Smith TOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 11, 2008
Format: Hardcover
What are the connections between the visions seen recently by Jennifer Narody, Carlos Albert and by the Mexican Jumano tribe some 300 years ago? Is it possible that the Lady in Blue is a sixteenth century nun with powers of bilocation? And why is the US Department of Defense interested?

Mr Sierra's novel is based in part on Sister María de Jesús who lived in Spain (1602 to 1665. An old Spanish historical mystery awakens the interest of a number of people including several cardinals in Rome. The novel is based on a famous legend that a strange Lady in Blue appeared to the Native Americans, informing them of the arrival of the first Conquistadores. The Conquistadores initially believed she was the Virgin of Guadalupe.

This novel is an interesting blend of legend and mystery, belief and fact. To some extent, the reader needs to decide where the boundaries are. For me, it was the action, rather than the characters that created the momentum in this novel. The Chronovision Project caught my attention, and I would love to read more about it.

This is not a particularly light read, but - depending on your views and values - it can be a rewarding one.

Jennifer Cameron-Smith
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By ellen VINE VOICE on June 29, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have heard that spirit has the ability to appear in 2 places at once. This book is about bilocation, but about a living nun 400 years ago who could appear in SW America and facilitate the conversion to Christianity of Native Americans. The Catholic Church has been studying how this bilocation occurred to see the possiblilties of replacating it. Turns out there really was something called Chronovision (chrono means year in Greek) - that can go back in time and hear the actions and sometimes take photos of the actions in the past. One of the creators is censored, after he speaks to a magazine talking about their progress on this top secret project. This book also deals with synchronicity - one of my favorite words - where everything comes together - is interelated - A journalist who wants to know God exists, and follows signs he is given, a lady who dreams of the Lady in Blue and can see beyond her dreams. And the work of God in mysterious and very cool ways.
This is a wonderful book. It is based on fact of occurances in the past of sightings and although I haven't researched the people Sierra says really have tried to duplicate Chronovision, lists them for reference.
Cannot wait for the next Sierra book to be translated.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Margaret Starbird on June 23, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Javier Sierra's "The Lady in Blue" is an intriguing "eye-opener" intertwining historical and scientific research with his own experience of amazing synchronicities. His remarkable novel focuses on the mysterious phenomenon of bilocation, or teleportation, and involves historical records of the Inquisition concerning the strange case of Sister María de Jesús de Ágreda, a 17th century Spanish nun. Through her miraculous apparitions to natives in the New World, she brought about their peaceful conversion to Catholicism before the arrival of Spanish missionaries--although she never physically left her convent in Spain. Sierra's skillfully woven narrative combines Sister Maria's amazing story with modern research into teleportation by power-motivated entities investigating its feasibility in psychic espionage. An exciting read!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tiny Prancer on November 5, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This novel could have been a riveting historical thriller but it falls flat. The elements are there: a conspiracy within the Church, a secret group, someone on the verge of discovering the truth, historical intrigue (sound familiar?).

But something is missing here. Why did I manage to get through this book and still have more questions than answers. Chronovision is/was real? How, what, who, why, where? And why, only after reading reviews here did I realize I missed some important points: the Inquistion had suspected Sister Maria of witchcraft? Carlos was agnostic?

The novel's ultimate main point is compelling but its impact is hindered by all the questions left unanswered. It's too bad because this book had the potential to the one that keeps you awake until 3 a.m. because you just can't put it down.
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