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The Lady Chapel Audio, Cassette – Audiobook, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: ISIS Audio Books; Unabridged edition (September 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 075310086X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0753100868
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.8 x 2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,176,208 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Robb puts the history back into the historical mystery." --Kirkus Reviews
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Candace Robb has read and researched medieval history for many years, having studied for a Ph.D in Medieval and Anglo-Saxon Literature. She is the author of nine Owen Archer novels and three Margaret Kerr Mysteries. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 5, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Politics and money drive a gruesome murder mystery in medieval England. It captures most of the elements of a first rate mystery with an added dimension of describing life in the Middle ages in England. The portraits of all the characters are very well drawn - each one has their own flaws and weaknesses. Owen Archer and his wife work through the reasons for the murders and the book does not try to tie up everything neatly but leaves the reader hungry for the next book
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By tertius3 on June 15, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Number 2 in the Owen Archer series of medieval mysteries, there is much here for men and women readers alike. In pursuing the grisly deaths of a string of wool merchants in York in 1365, the love between Owen and his new wife Lucie vacillates and grows as they strive to protect the innocent and pursue the conspirators at the behest of their Archbishop. This is a "snowball" novel: a story in which the circle of suspects widens and expands with each murder, rather than narrowing. As the author says, for mystery writers "innocence [is] little more than lack of opportunity." While the male characters appear to be concerned with the wider world, the female characters are the strongest and most interesting ones, for good...or evil. The writing style is somehat dense; it neither leaps off the page nor draws me in.
Except for one character's "thee- and thou-ing," and a few odd terms (see glossary), Robb makes little attempt to render the sounds or cadences of middle English, to differentiate classes of people, or to fill in the religion of the day. In more outward respects the sense of small town England comes across pretty well: tight and narrow towns, remote manors, the pageantry, diverse hand crafts, medicinals, the chill of winter, and the dangers of the night. The plot is somewhat intricate; you may eventually know who is at fault but have a hard time knowing how Owen will prove it. The stories usually evolve into more widely significant political spheres. In The Lady Chapel, we get unusual glimpses of the primitive economics of the time, and a remarkable excursis (for a novel) into the weak understanding of wool supply and taxation underpinning the government and court of King Edward III--and not irrelevant to the plot, either. The Archbishop's moral concern with the "purety" of monetary donations to building his Lady's Chapel (and tomb) is a thin excuse for the book's title. The pb fabric itself is nothing special.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brenda Jo Mengeling on February 16, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Lady Chapel, the second Owen Archer mystery, is an enjoyable read. For me, the best part of the mystery is seeing how Owen puts together all the pieces of the puzzle to solve the crime; for the reader the mystery isn't that difficult to solve. Detective work is still new to Archer, and he is a reluctant sleuth. How he develops the skills to solve the crimes is part of the enjoyment of the series.
Candace Robb does a good job of conveying the atmosphere of medieval York, and she is very good at avoiding psychological anachronisms. Her characters don't psychoanalyze each other, and feelings and motivations are described metaphorically not analytically.
The Lady Chapel continues to develop the working relationship between Owen and Thoresby, Archbishop of York. Owen and Lucie are adapting to married life with some difficulties. This book introduces us to Jasper, a young boy, who witnesses the first murder and then must go into hiding, fending for himself. He is such a sweet, yet tough, kid; I cheered for him throughout the entire book. The Lady Chapel should be read after The Apothecary Rose in order to understand the relationships of the characters. Readers of Rose will enjoy this second installment of the series.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Terri Korthase on March 8, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Candace Robb has one of the best medieval mystery series I've ran into so far--her only comparison is Ellis Peters--and I think I like Robb better! (And that is high praise!) Her charactorization is very convincing, weather the charactor is a reoccuring one, or just someone encountered in passing. The mysteries are well-constructed and difficult to solve before the end--I may like the middle ages, but if I've figured out the who-done-it before the end, it's still a disappointment. Robb's series has yet to let me down.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ellis Bell VINE VOICE on January 31, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
The Lady Chapel is the second in Cadace Robb's series featuring Owen Archer--Welsh bowman and apprentice apothecary--and his wife, Lucie Wilton. Here, it is 1365, and a wool merchant is murdered near York Minster, his throat slit and the only witness an eight-year-old boy. The solution to the problem which doesn't come easily for our unusual hero, involves the international wool trade, as well as King Edward III himself and his mistress, the wily Alive Perrers.

The writing style of this novel is a little dense, especially when talking about the politics of the time period. I also got the feeling that the speech patterns of the characters were a little anachronistic. The strength of the Owen Archer books lies in their plots, usually centering around something much larger than would appear at first, and The Lady Chapel is no exception. Robb does a great job intertwining the historical places and figures with the fictional. The best part of this series is, however, the characters; Owen and Lucie are compelling enough that they're worth staying with for future novels.
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