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24 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Masterful Must Read
As movie-loving fans, we approach autobiographies with trepidation, fearing that, stripped of melody and rhythm, our lyrical heroes will reveal themselves to be unremarkable artists, suits, or shallow thinkers. But from the opening pages of The Fat Lady Sang, Robert Evans does what few authors ever do: he one-ups himself from his last, successful book, The Kid Stays in...
Published 13 months ago by Ryan R. Rayston

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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Repetitive, vainglorious rubbish
If you REALLY want to understand narcissism and hubris on a molecular level, this is your book.
I enjoyed 'KID' because Evans actually had a great career during the period that book covered.
This is more the late night ramblings of a man whose time and moment has long passed. When a highlight of your life is having smoke blown up your orifices by Brett Ratner,...
Published 11 months ago by Mark Tierney


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24 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Masterful Must Read, November 12, 2013
This review is from: The Fat Lady Sang (Kindle Edition)
As movie-loving fans, we approach autobiographies with trepidation, fearing that, stripped of melody and rhythm, our lyrical heroes will reveal themselves to be unremarkable artists, suits, or shallow thinkers. But from the opening pages of The Fat Lady Sang, Robert Evans does what few authors ever do: he one-ups himself from his last, successful book, The Kid Stays in the Picture.

After a series of debilitating strokes, the effervescent and handsome Evans (former head of Paramount and mega-movie maker of such blockbusters as The Godfather, Chinatown, Marathon Man, to name merely a few), listens to the convoluted freeway of beeping monitors keeping him alive.

We lie with him in his struggle and go where his mind goes, and here, through a series of flashbacks you are hobnobbing with politicians, vacationing in the Caribbean, witnessing the inside scoop of mega-celebrities, money makers, and fixers. It is these remarkable, insightful stories that evoke a sense of what it must be like to live such an extraordinary life--and dwell within an extraordinary mind--while not being able to move. All these stories are intertwined with his recovery and, more importantly, his self discovery.

We root for him to walk, to speak, to survive, and this, indeed, is a survivor's tale.
As in most autobiographies, it is the original story that holds greatest fascination, and this indulgent, funny, philosophical, angry and, at times, dazzlingly brilliant tome feels authentically the work and mind of the one and only Robert Evans. It's an all-access pass to a rich inner world that one can't help to admire. If you admire him, know him, or just love his movies and moxie, you can't help but fall in love with him.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Repetitive, vainglorious rubbish, January 17, 2014
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This review is from: The Fat Lady Sang (Kindle Edition)
If you REALLY want to understand narcissism and hubris on a molecular level, this is your book.
I enjoyed 'KID' because Evans actually had a great career during the period that book covered.
This is more the late night ramblings of a man whose time and moment has long passed. When a highlight of your life is having smoke blown up your orifices by Brett Ratner, you are a pale shadow of the the man you once were.
And it does Catherine Oxenberg no favors either.

An appallingly sad book.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A World Class Producer Overcomes The Odds, December 28, 2013
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This review is from: The Fat Lady Sang (Paperback)
I greatly enjoyed Robert Evans' first biography, "The Kid Stays In The Picture" published in the early 90s; the title refers to Evans having been cast in the screen adaptation of Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises in 1957 as a Spanish matador and love interest for Lady Brett, portrayed by Ava Gardner. The cast, including Tyrone Power and Errol Flynn thought that Evans' acting was a joke , however, Darryl Zanuck, head of production at 20th Century Fox, came to Madrid and announced through a loudspeaker that "the kid stays in the picture". Evans, after an undistinguished acting career, became the head of production at Paramount, anointed by Charles Bludhorn, and he oversaw the filming of Coppola's The Godfather [ he butted heads with the director over the construction of the film] Rosemary's Baby[ he fought for Polanski as director and Mia Farrow as star; her refusal to leave the film cost Farrow her marriage to Frank Sinatra]; Love Story [ he ultimately married its star Ali MacGraw ], True Grit, and The Odd Couple. Thereafter, he became an independent producer of such critical and commercial successes as Chinatown and Marathon Man. This sequel deals with the rebirth of his career following the phenomenal success of the first book and the well received documentary produced by Graydon Carter of Vanity Fair, and to a great extent with his miraculous recovery from a series of debilitating strokes suffered in 1998. He documents his convalescence from the strokes which initially caused a paralysis of his arm and leg and impaired his speech and gait. He defied his renowned doctors, who projected a dramatically limited existence, and he made a full functional recovery. He also recounts a whirlwind courtship and very brief marriage to the stunning and much younger Dynasty actress Catherine Oxenberg, which is fascinating and hilarious. He relates adventures with Alain Delon, the French acting icon, with his close friends Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty and his ongoing pursuit of beautiful women, past and present. There is a particularly moving passage involving his receipt of a prestigious life achievement award named after David O. Selznick, which is presented to Evans by Dustin Hoffman, with whom the producer worked in Marathon Man; Hoffman does a dead on impression of Evans which is visible in "The Kid" documentary and in the You Tube presentation. The speech, memorialized in its entirety, is hysterical, poignant and perceptively sums up the career of this fascinating man who loves life, lives in a magnificent home, and loves the process of making movies. Highly recommended to all who enjoyed the first book and who are interested in a life affirming biography of a film icon.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One too many memoirs, March 13, 2014
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This review is from: The Fat Lady Sang (Paperback)
Evans should have stopped after "The Kid Stays in the Picture" which was great reading.
The fact that it was published as a paperback original should have been my first clue. It reads like the outtakes fromt he first book.
That editor was smart enough to edit. This editor should have never encouraged Evans to rehash much of what was in the first memoir.
Hopefully, Evans is through writing.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Kid STAYS in the Picture, Redux, January 20, 2014
By 
Stacy Helton (Chattanooga, TN) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Fat Lady Sang (Paperback)
For several students of film and biography, Robert Evans’ 1994 memoir, THE KID STAYS IN THE PICTURE, is one of the finest examples of that genre ever put on paper. Robert Evans unique voice jumps off the page, and the audio book version, simply gravy. Evan recounted his years in NYC in the 1940s, flirting with movie stardom in the 1950s and his career at Paramount, where the hits (ROSEMARY’S BABY, THE GODFATHER, CHINATOWN, LOVE STORY etc) kept on coming, leading up the 1980s collapse of THE TWO JAKES and THE COTTON CLUB. Evans’ newly published sequel, THE FAT LADY SANG, is slim by Evans’ standards but entertaining nonetheless. The book goes back and forth between chapters chronicling Evan’s 1998 stroke, his brief marriage to Cathy Oxenberg and more stories from his checkered career, including the documentary and animated versions of KID. Told with his one-of-a-kind voice, the book makes a great addition to the Evans’ canon of Hollywood lore. When they say “they don’t make ‘em like that anymore” they could easily be talking up the iconic Robert Evans.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book!, February 10, 2014
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This review is from: The Fat Lady Sang (Kindle Edition)
He is a gifted storyteller that keeps you interested from start to finish. What a life he has led! Amazing!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars yuk on trying to figure out what , when , and why!!!!!, March 25, 2014
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This review is from: The Fat Lady Sang (Kindle Edition)
I hated the way the book progressed. I had no idea what year or what event was evolving. I loved "the Kid Stays in the Picture" . . .(book and documentary). All Evens had to do here was convey what year he was flashing back to or when he was coming back to the present. I forced myself to finish it. Yuk.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good read., February 15, 2014
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This review is from: The Fat Lady Sang (Kindle Edition)
Good book. Well written I was not able to put it down. He was a very lucky man to have survived and able to function after three strokes.
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5.0 out of 5 stars ... review I read of this outstanding book and it pretty much sums it up for me, October 21, 2014
This review is from: The Fat Lady Sang (Paperback)
"Dwell within an extraordinary mind" - the phrase which most struck me from the first review I read of this outstanding book and it pretty much sums it up for me.

This man, Robert Evans, head of Paramount Pictures, mega-movie maker, so many achievements therefore so many descriptions one could use but it's all by the by, because at the end of the day he is and has just that: An Extraordinary Mind, and that mind is laid open in this incredible account of his flashbacks of his life whilst lying, being unable to move after a series of life-threatening strokes.

What a mind! And what flashbacks! Whoa. We are taken, pulled through the thoughts and stepping through the memory of an extraordinary life, led by an extraordinary man. And this man, not only survived, but by pure guts and commendable willpower came back to live a totally normal life, had a new beginning. As he said on the Charlie Rose show hosted by Wes Anderson: "I've fooled them, it's called staying in the picture pal."

Do yourselves a favour and read it, that's all I'm gonna say...
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3.0 out of 5 stars Fat lady sang, June 23, 2014
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This review is from: The Fat Lady Sang (Kindle Edition)
I read his first book, "The Kid stays in the picture"and that was pretty good. This new book is OK. The dialogue always sounds like a B movie however, but perhaps that's the way he really talks. His ego is huge but to accomplish what he has in the past, I guess it's a necessity. He is trying so hard to remain relevant in today's Hollywood, and that isn't easy. so the book comes across as sad really, as he tries to remain a force. I do admire his fortitude, but to grow old gracefully may be something he finds difficult to achieve. Not sure if I like him or not.
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The Fat Lady Sang
The Fat Lady Sang by Robert Evans (Paperback - November 12, 2013)
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