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The Landry News Paperback – September 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 950L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (September 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0689828683
  • ISBN-13: 978-0689828683
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (89 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #23,309 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 4-6-Cara Landry, entering as a new fifth-grade student in Mr. Larson's class, is quiet and unassuming. Barely noticed by classmates or her teacher, she publishes her first edition of the Landry News creating a transformation of teacher, students, and even herself. Her editorial states simply, "There is a teacher in the classroom, but he does not teach." Emerging from years of disillusionment, he begins to teach again. Journalism with all its ramifications and responsibilities are his tools. All the fifth-graders decide to help Cara publish the Landry News regularly as their class project. This gives the principal just the right tool to rid himself of Mr. Larson something he has waited for patiently. What begins as a small school conflict grows into a First Amendment Rights issue that solidifies friendships for, and love of Mr. Larson. As in Frindle (S&S, 1996), author Andrew Clements (S&S, 1999) uses an everyday classroom setting to illuminate words and their importance. Using clear and simple sentence structure, hard issues such as divorce, loyalty, and responsibility are presented with sensitivity and a lot of humor. Listeners will appreciate Cara's visit to the principal's office and her gauge, the "mad-o-meter," to assess the situation. Academic issues summarized such as newspaper analysis, the Constitution, and the First Amendment are introduced and briefly summarized. Actor Andrew McCarthy uses inflection and tone with subtle voice changes to make the fifth grade girls and boys and the stodgy principal vital and believable characters. This is an enjoyable story that also provides a great deal of information on some important and current issues.-Tina Hudak, St. Bernard's School, Riverdale, MD

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

From Library Journal

Grade 4-6-A fifth grader's scathing editorial criticizing her burned-out teacher spurs him to take his duties seriously. A terrific read about free speech, the power of the pen, and the need to temper truth with mercy. (July)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Most of my characters are fairly normal people who are dealing with the basics of everyday life--getting along with others, finding a place in the world, discovering talents, overcoming challenges, trying to have some wholesome fun along the way, and getting into some scrapes and a little mischief now and then, too. I guess I hope my readers will be able to see bits and pieces of themselves in the stories, particularly the novels that take place in and around school. School is a rich setting because schools and education are at the heart of every community. The stories that are set in school seem to resonate with kids, teachers, parents, librarians--readers of all ages. Everyone's life has been touched by school experiences. And I also hope, of course, that kids and others will enjoy reading, enjoy the use of language, enjoy my storytelling.

Customer Reviews

Clements is a wonderful writer.
bmfc1
Mr. Larson goes from tired teacher to inspired teacher as persistent Cara Landry challenges the way things have been.
Marissa Gonzalez
The characters in the story are very detailed and interesting.
6th grade class

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Volkert Volkersz on February 28, 2002
Format: Hardcover
A couple of weeks ago I read "Frindle," by Andrew Clements, and decided it was one of the best kids' books I'd read in a long time. As a result, I decided to read "The Landry News," and my reaction is just as positive. I'm an elementary school librarian, and I can tell you I'll be ordering several more copies of these books--as well as other titles by Clements--for our library.
Clements has a way of writing a deceptively simple story--with many interweaving layers--that make his tales appealing to both children and adults. As in "Frindle," where a fifth-grade boy invents a new word, Clements takes a small, seemingly insignificant event, in this case the creation of a single newspaper posted on the wall by a new girl in class, to set in motion a growing chain of events that gets bigger and bigger. It's almost as if Andrew Clements is saying that there is no such thing as an insignificant event. As John Donne wrote, "No man is an island."
Some of the seemingly small things that moves the plot along in this engaging story are: not one, but two divorces; the newspaper on the wall; a burned-out teacher reading newspapers and drinking coffee; a mother reading a couple of verses from the Book of Psalms to her daughter; apologies; a helpful librarian; a "concerned" principal; an inquisitive small town newspaper reporter; new friends; the Bill of Rights and; "truth and mercy."
If these two first books are any indication, Andrew Clements is an author worth paying attention to. His stories have "heart."
This book, written at a 6th grade level, would make an excellent read-aloud for upper elementary classes. Having said that, I think this story is inspiring enough to be read to any class--even up through high school--that is involved in journalism or some kind of "newspapers in education" curriculum. This is one of those stories that has staying power and is filled with wisdom. Highly recommended!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 25, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is an awesome book because it will get you sitting on the edge of your seat just waiting to see what happens next. Almost every time you read another surprise happens. It's about a girl named Cara Landry who changes her teacher's life and changes him into a different person by writing a school newspaper.

The motto of this book is truth and mercy. Cara is the kind of girl who you can trust because she never gives up. Mr. Larson in this book is a guy who reads the paper and drinks coffee while he's supposed to teach the class. Dr. Barnes is the principal of the school and all he thinks about is himself and getting Mr. Larson fired. I would recommend this book for kids ages 8 and up. I loved this book because it was exciting and because I thought the characters had interesting personalities and there was always something going on between Mr. Larson and Dr. Barnes, which made the book more interesting to read.

~E.S.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on December 21, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is great; The Landry News features many details about newspapers. I learned about parts on a newspaper I didn't even know existed. As Cara Landry starts fifth grade at another school, she feels a little nervous. Mr. Larson, her teacher does not teach. Cara sees that all Mr. Larson pays attention to is a newspaper while drinking his coffee. She decides to make her own newspaper with the help of her friends, but she has some articles that can cause problems for other people.

I would recommend this book to anyone. It had humor and mystery. It was very descriptive and it kept me involved. I always wanted to read more to see what would happen next.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D.C. on September 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
A timely back-to-school read for parents, students and teachers (even principals!). I started reading after dinner and didn't put the book down until I finished. Without giving away the twists and turns of the story, the book touches upon the essence of teaching and learning. Best of all the story values empathy, initiative, and student self-expression. My fifth grade son was so inspired while reading, he sat down and tapped out his own "newspaper" on the computer. Buy this book for upper grade students, and make sure your school library has a copy. This story is sure to make a few teachers squirm, and many parents think twice about the challenges of teaching. Who knows how many student/classroom newspapers the story will inspire!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on September 25, 2007
Format: Paperback
The Landry News is a great book for kids any age. It might give you inspiration on journalism. Now even our class has a newspaper called The Weekly Buzz. This book might not be good for you if you are emotional because there are two divorces. Over all I think this book is very well written and Andrew Clements is an awesome author!
-Killer Bee (a 5th grader)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 18, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The Landry News by Andrew Clements is a thrilling fiction story with many funny characters. The book is about a girl named Cara Landry who is mad about her parents divorce. Cara is a fifth new grader at Denton Elementary School and decides to start a newspaper called The Landry News. Then one day she made a newspaper that said that her teacher Mr. Larson isn't teaching his class because he believes that children should teach themselves. Then the principal Dr. Barnes read the newspaper and wanted to fire Mr. Larson. When found out about this she felt bad and wanted to help. So Cara decided to write a section in the paper that said how Mr. Larson was teacher of the year

three times in a row and why he should keep his job.

The story had a valuable lesson about how you should not judge people and write about them. The Landry News would be a great book to read because it is exciting and full of thrilling words. So I highly recommend reading this book because you won't be able to stop reading it.
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