The Last Days Of Disco 1998 R CC

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(122) IMDb 6.6/10
Available in HD
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Two beautiful recent college graduates played by Kate Beckinsale (Underworld) and ChlŲe Sevigny ("Big Love") escape to the most popular dance club of disco's waning days in the early '80s.

Starring:
Chloë Sevigny, Kate Beckinsale
Runtime:
1 hour 55 minutes

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The Last Days Of Disco

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, Music, Comedy
Director Whit Stillman
Starring Chloë Sevigny, Kate Beckinsale
Supporting actors Chris Eigeman, Mackenzie Astin, Matt Keeslar, Robert Sean Leonard, Jennifer Beals, Matt Ross, Tara Subkoff, Burr Steers, David Thornton, Jaid Barrymore, Sonsee Neu, Edoardo Ballerini, Scott Beehner, Zachary Taylor, Neil Butterfield, Michael Weatherly, James Murtaugh, John C. Havens
Studio Universal Pictures
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

64 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Luis Hernandez on June 30, 2001
Format: DVD
Directed by the amazing Whit Stillman ("Barcelona"; "Metropolitan"), "The Last Days of Disco" examines the life of several young, upward, professionals (or "yuppies" for short) during the early 1980's, when the disco craze was dying and the Decade of Decadence was beginning.
Alice (ChloŽ Sevigny of "Boys Don't Cry") and Charlotte (Kate Beckisndale of "Brokedown Palace") are two young publishing assistants who live as roommates in the city. Living on a love/hate relationship with one another, both girls decide to socialize with New York's club elite at the most popular club in the city.
There, they meet up with the likes of advertising execs and employees, odd club characters such as the Tiger Lady (played by Drew Barrymore's real-life mother, Jaid Barrymore) and others who give the film a unique flavor when it comes to recreating the disco era of the late 1970's/early 1980's.
While I really can't give away the details that moves the film to its' conclusion, all I can say that this film blows away the only other disco-era film that was released around the same time, "Studio 54." While the latter tried to recreate the final days of New York City's most infamous nightspot, it failed to capture the energy that disco era was well-known for. Unlike "Studio 54," instead of revolving around the life of one character, "Last Days" focuses on the lives of several young professionals, which gives it more flavor and attraction.
Personally, Whit Stillman simply is one of the best American directors out there. His films all involve wit, energy, love, and the elements that plague young adults now and then.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Michael Laursen on December 2, 1999
Format: DVD
If you can't stand to watch another exploding helicopter, "Disco" and the other two Whit Stillman movies are a good antidote. The characters actually say interesting things.
You may want to watch "Metropolitan" before watching "The Last Days of Disco" to understand the world the characters come from. You may be a little misled by watching "Metropolitan" first, though. It's a simple, gentle story while "Barcelona" and "Disco" are sexier and set in more exotic locales.
Some reviewers didn't like these movies because the characters speak articulately in fully-formed, grammatically-correct sentences. I can see where they might mistake it for bad writing or acting. The bio commentary on the "Disco" DVD talks about the film crew being impressed by the Sevigny and Beckinsale's ability to recreate New England prep school speech - an indication that preppies really talk that way. I'm from California where we're all inarticulate, so I wouldn't know. Ultimately, I don't care - people don't break out singing in real life, either, but you wouldn't want to do away with musicals. Notice that the non-preppy characters in these movies talk like "normal" people.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Andre Dursin on July 12, 2012
Format: Blu-ray
Whit Stillman's 1998 film "The Last Days of Disco" remains one of his best pictures - a refreshing, intelligent, and often subtly hilarious look at shallow yuppies living, clubbing, and loving at the tail end of the Disco era (i.e. "the very early 1980s"). The demure Chloe Sevigny and the bitchy Kate Beckinsale play a vastly different pair of publishing assistants who decide to room in a New York railroad apartment while they hit the highlife at night with a colorful group of supporting characters -- not the least of which include advertising man Mackenzie Astin (who needs the disco to attract clients), club bouncer Chris Eigeman (a Stillman regular), and assistant district attorney Matt Keeslar (who perhaps has both the hots for Sevigny, and ulterior motives for visiting the disco himself).

The performances are uniformly on target, each character believably echoing the frivolous nature of the music, but also the genuine feeling for the time and place they do share. Stillman provides seemingly every character with a vital scene or line of dialogue, and comes down hard on their essentially materialistic ideals while never condemning them or turning the picture into a broadly comic spoof. Sevigny's character, in particular, is a credible portrait of a young girl lost in the big city, emotionally if nothing else, and Beckinsale creates one of the most effectively obnoxious (but believable!) women you're ever likely to see on the big screen, years before the actress dedicated most of her time to becoming a plastic action figure.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 4, 2000
Format: DVD
After Metropolitan andn Barcelona, one would expect the acting in The Last Days of Disco to be atrocious. That's not the case. For perhaps the first time, Stillman has managed to fuse a reflective story with decent acting. The result is, I think, a movie that just gets better each time you watch it. The more you watch, the more you realise it's just like a Fitzgerald or Hemmingway novel. The conversation about lady and the tramp, the bitchiness of Kate Beckinsale... it all adds up to a great movie. If you have a bit of time to spare, and you're willing to pay attention to it, watch the movie. Whilst Metropolitan and Barcelona were both great (I'm a big Stillman fan), I think The Last Days of Disco shows the director at a new level of maturity.
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