Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

The Last Emperors: A Social History of Qing Imperial Institutions Revised ed. Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0520228375
ISBN-10: 0520228375
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$24.99 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$36.95 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
26 New from $23.80 23 Used from $14.90
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Save Up to 90% on Textbooks Textbooks
$36.95 FREE Shipping. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Last Emperors: A Social History of Qing Imperial Institutions
  • +
  • A Translucent Mirror: History and Identity in Qing Imperial Ideology
  • +
  • Manchus and Han: Ethnic Relations and Political Power in Late Qing and Early Republican China, 1861-1928 (Studies on Ethnic Groups in China)
Total price: $99.69
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This book is of immense importance to the China field. Evelyn Rawski makes the greatest contribution we can expect from a superior scholarly work: to offer bold conceptual arguments while providing solid groundwork for generations of future researchers." -Susan Mann, author of Precious Records "Rawski's study represents a landmark beginning for a new historiography of China: here is an interior view of an imperial China far more complex and multicultural than previously known." -Dru Gladney, author of Ethnic Identity in China"

From the Inside Flap

"This book is of immense importance to the China field. Evelyn Rawski makes the greatest contribution we can expect from a superior scholarly work: to offer bold conceptual arguments while providing solid groundwork for generations of future researchers."—Susan Mann, author of Precious Records

"Rawski's study represents a landmark beginning for a new historiography of China: here is an interior view of an imperial China far more complex and multicultural than previously known."—Dru Gladney, author of Ethnic Identity in China
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE



Product Details

  • Series: Philip E.Lilienthal Books
  • Paperback: 466 pages
  • Publisher: University of California Press; Revised ed. edition (February 5, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520228375
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520228375
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,268,640 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
83%
4 star
17%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In this work Dr. Rawski argues convincingly for her side of the sinicization debate regarding the Manchu conquest dynasty, the Qing (1644-1911). For those of you who are new to the field of modern Chinese history you may be interested in reading the articles of Rawski and Ho Ping-ti (He Pingdi) found in the Journal of Asian Studies, published in the mid-90's. The debate that was started by those articles is still of great importance to modern Chinese history, and it seems that although Rawski and others have presented a very strong case no one as of yet has been victorious. Many scholars still hold the views of Ho Ping-ti (or some version there of). Although, I suspect that over time Rawski's views will triumph. The argument, simply stated, is the question - to what extent where the "conquest dynasties," especially the Qing (Manchu) Dynasty, sinicized? In the past, scholars (perhaps dominated by the sino-centric Chinese interpretation) have agreed that foreign powers who dominated the Chinese empire forsook their own cultures in favor of a Chinese identity. This included the adoption of the Confucian civil service tradition as well as the Chinese language and many other Chinese cultural traits and behavior patterns. In recent years however, scholars have given evidence to support a very different view of dynasties like the Qing. A certain level of sinicization is undeniable, and no one challenges the fact that the Manchu banner-elite adopted a very Chinese approach to governance and cultural issues, however they also held on tightly to their own culture and went to great efforts to distinguish themselves from the Han Chinese as a ruling elite.Read more ›
Comment 15 of 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I had been taught in my high school history that "Manchus conquered China on horseback but eventually they were assimilated by the Chinese, becoming more Chinese than the Chinese". After reading E.Rawski's book, I'm beginning to question what my history teachers taught me.
E.Rawski's concentrated research on the Manchu royal family shows that the Manchus, particularly the elite did not lose their cultural heritage but in fact strove to maintain it.
The book explains how the Manchu royal family differed from the Chinese dynasties in their various aspects of social life. As the book is divided in chapters, it's easy to follow and read.
In my humble opinion, this book is for those who wish to study the Manchu monarchy in more detail.
1 Comment 8 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book beautifully describes the social fabric of life during the Qing Dynasty. As the author claims, she was privy to previously undisclosed Imperial records and has unearthed new insights into Qing customs.
I was introduced to this book after reading Jonathan Spence's "Treason by the book". Mr Spence, perhaps the foremost sinologist writing in a Western vein, has himself praised this book for its fount of new information on the Qing period.
I couldn't agree more and can also add that it is highly readable.
Comment 5 of 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Last Emperors: A Social History of Qing Imperial Institutions
This item: The Last Emperors: A Social History of Qing Imperial Institutions
Price: $36.95
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

Want to discover more products? Check out these pages to see more: last rites book, china last emperor, roberte n hamayon