The Last Face You'll Ever See: The Culture of Death Row and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $1.97 (13%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This copy shows very minor wear. Free State Books. Never settle for less.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Last Face You'll Ever See: The Culture of Death Row Paperback – November 26, 2002


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.02
$3.50 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

The Last Face You'll Ever See: The Culture of Death Row + Newjack: Guarding Sing Sing
Price for both: $25.69

Buy the selected items together
If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 69%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (November 26, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060931035
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060931032
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,570,379 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Chilling.” (Globe Magazine)

“Profound...” (New York Times Book Review)

About the Author

Ivan Solotaroff is a journalist who has been published in Esquire, the Village Voice, and Philadelphia Magazine, among other leading magazines. He is the author of a collection of essays, No Success Like Failure. He lives in Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By JMack VINE VOICE on February 7, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Solotaroff's original idea for this book was a good idea in theory. The book is focused on stories from Mississippi's death row, but the stories don't go anywhere. It was about as interesting as reading the phone.
The book follows the life of a particular executioner and those who work around him. The one redeeming quality of the book is detail given to the infamous execution of James Lee Gray. A few humorous points in the book were also worth reading such as the practical jokes on inmates and testing the gas chamber out on a turtle. These exceptions, the book is dull and depressing. The author spends an exceptionally long time discussing details which which are unncessary. Musing about the commute to work, what was for dinner, and other miscellaneous ramblings take away from the book. The writing also seems to focus more on the structure of the gas chamber than how it was used. While the book does give insight as to the deteriorated condition the lives of executioners often go into, the structure of the book leaves much to be desired. Solotaroff should have broadened his focus to include other executioners with varying and interesting stories.
I would discourage people from buying this book. This view of a life working on death row is very limited and certainly would have been a better read with storyline that focuses less on one man's experience in Mississippi.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By B. perks on November 1, 2008
Format: Paperback
Having seen a tv programme about the American capital punishment system during which The author of this book was being interviewed, I thought I'd like to read his work. This book is very interesting and shocking in some ways. very good information, makes you stop and think from the executioners point of view, and also how deserving some prisoners are to be executed, while others perhaps not. Good informative reading, though not for the faint hearted.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This is an unforgettable book about people who live on the margins where very few are willing to go. Ivan Solotaroff had the patience and humanity to listen for what most of us don't want to know and to hear what is usually unspeakable. He tells the story of the people among us who take up the burden of enacting our condemnation of fellow human beings rather than just having an opinion about it. The cost to the executioner of carrying out our sacrifices is slowly, stunningly drawn out in this book. It comes as a blow to hear the depth of collateral damage that occurs around even the most 'justified' execution. In focusing especially on one man's experience, Mr. Solotaroff raises many questions I have not heard elsewhere about the reality of what we do to ourselves as a society when we execute prisoners.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Very interesting book about the modern death penalty in America - mostly discussing its history from the 1976 lift of the Supreme Court ban on executions through the 80's when the criminally dull lethal injection method gradually replaced the far more morbidly interesting gas chamber and electric chair. It goes into graphic detail on some of the most infamous bungled gas and electricity executions of the era and gives insight into why some of the men who carried out the executions later became staunch anti-death penalty activists. The book gets a bit dull about half-way through when it starts to focus on the life story of an unpleasant man named Donald Hocutt who was the Mississippi executioner for several years. (That's his ugly mug on the cover.) Honestly, I could not possibly care less about the guy or his practical joking daredevil macho past. However, when the book isn't indulging in Hocutt's meager accomplishments, it's an excellent morbid read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?