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The Last Filipino Head Hunters Paperback – May, 2001


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Paperback, May, 2001
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 177 pages
  • Publisher: Last Gasp; First Printing edition (May 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 086719507X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0867195071
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,508,764 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Scruffy Scirocco on April 23, 2004
The main attraction of this book is the brilliant photography. This was given to me as a birthday present while I was actually in the area covered by the book. I was disappointed that he did not visit the eastern Cordillera Igorots with which I am familiar.
Mr. Howard's experiences are amusing and too true to life, but I found some of his conclusions erroneous and he seemed a bit too credulous towards everything he was told. He is obviously an outsider to this culture, and as such the locals tended to embellish a bit, and he bought it all. I am an honorary member of this culture by marriage. Concerning the ages of the interviewees, I highly doubt the statements he documents. This culture had no idea about keeping time until the government required it. I have spent a dozen years trying to forensically figure out the ages of my own father and mother-in-law; and there is considerable doubt about the actual age of my wife, who was born sometime between 1960 and 1965. The only historical benchmark most of these people have is the Japanese occupation during WWII. If the author had done a little more questioning, I'm sure he could have gotten some much better stories. I found some of his observations a bit condescending due to lack of familiarity, for example the reference to "cheap gin" as a medium of exchange. In actual fact the Ginebra San Miguel is a standard social fixture throughout northern Luzon, and normally no gathering of men is without a bottle, but foreign outsiders are rarely party to such gatherings. He draws an incomplete conclusion about the poverty of the Ifugao landholder who couldn't afford to provide a pig for the celebration.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By V. Keating on January 8, 2002
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David Howard's photojournalism in "The Last Filipino Head Hunters" does an excellent job of documenting these tribal people and their way of life. Along with photos of their wonderful and often ancient faces, the book captures their jewelry, carvings, fabrics, and tattoos.
As tattoo reference, Howard's book stands alone in its thorough photo documentation of many traditional Filipino male and female designs. This tattoo documentation holds special significance as the elders (some over 100 years old) who wear them are beginning to die out.
The first person narrative text is fun and informative but a little sparse. It is part history and part travelogue, including wonderful tales of people from the Kalinga and Ifugao tribes.
Sadly, the print quality is slightly substandard and some of the photographs are noticeably low in resolution, but the stunning content largely makes up for this.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By R. Gage on September 9, 2005
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excellent read. more of a travel journal than a scientific piece. but still give plenty of ethnographic information. i think the native Filipinos are not studied as much as say the Asmat of New Guinea or the Dyak of Borneo because the Philippines are considered 'modern'. but once you get outside the major cities you are right back in the isolated jungle.
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By JomliCC on November 14, 2013
How long did this author stayed and lived with the Kalingas before writing a book? a day or two, less than a week? Of all the books i read about my people, this book is at the bottom.
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