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Comment: A good-very good ex library hardback with a couple of usual marks. Has nice dust jacket. The text and interior are nicely clean condition and free from rips, creases or other markings. This item presents with very light handling/shelf wear. It ships immediately. S30
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The Last King of Brighton (Brighton Mysteries) Hardcover – June 1, 2011


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The Last King of Brighton (Brighton Mysteries) + Thing Itself (The Brighton Trilogy)
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Product Details

  • Series: Brighton Mysteries
  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Severn House Publishers (June 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0727880098
  • ISBN-13: 978-0727880093
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.7 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,839,414 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"I don't need the competition, but honesty demands I confess - this is a great thriller." --Lee Child

There's plenty to enjoy in Guttridge's latest procedural starring Chief Constable Robert Watts of the Brighton police. Good words, well used. Clipped, incisive prose. And it's fun to meet a type banished too long from crime fiction, literate bad guys, such as a brutal killer quoting The Rubaiyat and providing a translation. Michael Caine's film career is discussed. Not to be outdone, a copper displays familiarity with E. M. Forster. But the plot is a problem. About an especially nasty gang of Eastern Europeans invading a crime lord's turf, it moves forward in a series of tableaus, nearly each dazzling in itself but seemingly only very tenuously connected to the others. It's partly a point-of-view problem. With all the cops, killers, victims, and relatives, who's telling the story? Readers familiar with this second-in-a-series' predecessor, City of Dreadful Night (2010), may find it easier to get their bearings, but those new to it may feel stranded, wondering what trunk murder and train robbery everybody is talking about. --Booklist, May 1, 2011

More About the Author

Peter Guttridge is the author of the acclaimed Brighton trilogy - City of Dreadful Night, The Last King of Brighton and The Thing Itself. He has written two further Brighton novels featuring some of the same characters: The Devil's Moon and Those Who Feel Nothing. His novella, The Belgian and The Beekeeper (Kindle Original), set on the Sussex Downs in 1916, is a playful account of an encounter between Sherlock Holmes and a certain celebrated foreign detective. He is also the author of the award-winning Nick Madrid satirical crime series and a non-fiction account of England's Great Train Robbery. His stand-alone thriller, Paradise Island, set on a barrier isle off Georgia, was published as an e-book original in September 2014.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Gray on March 12, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
2nd part of a series-took a while to get into as there is a lot of background of new characters, but it carried the plot forward.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not everyone's cut of tea (or bucket of blood). It is, however, a very literary thriller that rewards careful reading. Start this trilogy at the beginning, "City of Dreadful Night", and see it through.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I loved this book from the first to the last page. Peter Guttridge is a very talented and gifted writer. The characters are varied and outstanding and the complex plot moves briskly along. There is a great deal of suspense and mystery that make the book very difficult to put down. I also enjoyed the historical aspect of the book very much.

I highly recommend this book and this author.
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Format: Hardcover
THE LAST KING OF BRIGHTON, the second book in the Brighton trilogy, begins in 1963. John Hathaway is the teen-age son of Dennis Hathaway, the most dangerous man in Brighton. He runs the city without conscience or remorse. His son is interested in only one thing: the emerging music tidal wave that will put Britain at the top of the charts.

John is part of a band called the Avalons; his best friend is Charlie Laker, the drummer. As a band, they aren't particularly good but they never have trouble finding a pub or a club willing to let them play. Gradually, they become "supporter bands" for some of the big names in the UK. John and his friends are delighted at their success, dreaming of being on the same level as The Animals and, maybe, even the Beatles. John's ambitions are limited to rock-n-roll until he realizes that all the places the Avalons play are either owned by his father or have installed, willingly or not, the one-armed bandits that provide Dennis with significant cash. John begins to look at his father's business with eyes wide open. Rock-n-roll success isn't guaranteed but his father's income is based on instilling fear in some and satisfying greed in others. There is no end to people depositing money into his father's coffers. The elder Hathaway is content being one of the forces that dominates Brighton but John intends to be a one-man force, the King of Brighton.

THE LAST KING OF BRIGHTON does not have a wasted sentence. As the writer takes the story through the 1960's, it is a tour of the cultural landscape of one area of Great Britain that is a microcosm of the nation as a whole.
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